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Old 06-07-2004, 09:45 AM   #1 (permalink)
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how many volts can a coil handle

HI ALL
Some of you may remember I was having hot starting probs. Well come to find out I was only getting 5 volts to my coil even at start up.. so I hooked up a switch to supply 12v to my coil when starting sence my system wasn't doing it.. When I checked the volts befor I put in the switch it was 5v key on, 8v running, and 10v reving. With the added switch turned on I'm getting 12v key on, 14v running, and 16+ reving . I noticed a slight miss at idle and when I would turn the added switch on it would clear up.. I though OOO hotter spark, cleaner burn, more power... right...
So I guess my question is can a coil handle short burst of more volts (say 14v to 16v) with out frying out. So one could use the hotter spark during a race for more power.
Thanks
Tim
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Old 06-07-2004, 10:25 AM   #2 (permalink)
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how many volts can a coil handle

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Old 06-07-2004, 10:29 AM   #3 (permalink)
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how many volts can a coil handle

Stock coils use only 6 volts, 12 volts are too much.
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Old 06-07-2004, 10:42 AM   #4 (permalink)
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how many volts can a coil handle

HI
I guess I should have stated I am using a accell standard size super stock coil it does say 12v on it..
Tim
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Old 06-07-2004, 11:13 AM   #5 (permalink)
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how many volts can a coil handle

MSD 6-series ignitions supply the coil with 480v. I don't know whether it's continuous or bursts...but they work great.
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Old 06-07-2004, 12:54 PM   #6 (permalink)
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how many volts can a coil handle

Aren't you running a Duraspark? Should be 12V. Try running a relay & see if it helps
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Old 06-07-2004, 02:01 PM   #7 (permalink)
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how many volts can a coil handle

HAY YA QTRMILER
Yes I'm running a Duraspark. I just looked at a diagram maybe I need to look at my power supply wire to the module It might be on the wronge side of the resistor wire that powers the coil. One guy says that there is only supose to be 7v at the coil?? Shouldn't I have at least 12v to the red wire of the module? and Maybe 12v to the white wire as well??
Tim
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Old 06-07-2004, 04:13 PM   #8 (permalink)
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how many volts can a coil handle

Electrically, this is what can happen if the coil gets too much voltage:

The primary winding can't support the current thru it and it burns out

The secondary voltage becomes so high that the dielectric (usually oil) breaks down (begins to conduct electricity) and the coil burns out.

The spark plug wires can't handle the secondary voltage and the dielectric (usually silicone) breaks down and the spark jumps to ground before the spark plug.

Unless the coil is rated for 12-14 volts on the primary, like a flame thrower, it won't be able to handle it and it's life will be shortened.



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Old 06-07-2004, 05:45 PM   #9 (permalink)
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how many volts can a coil handle

The problem with coils getting too hot with 12V occurs mainly at low rpm, hence the voltage is reduced. At higher rpm, they can handle more voltage (as they are "emptied" more often", which is adjusted by a Duraspark module. In the old days, no voltage adjusting adjusting electronics were available, so it was operating at 5-6 Volts at all rpm.
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Old 06-07-2004, 06:33 PM   #10 (permalink)
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how many volts can a coil handle

Ah yes, the Pertronix Flamethrower coil. Epoxy-filled,
black in color, standard in size and capable of surviving
a full 12 volts on the primary side. It's a very high
quality Echlin part available at your neighborhood NAPA
store. Not all coils are created equally, that one will
definitely take a lot of more abuse than most of the
other "replacement" coils available. Pertronix is getting
a pretty deep deal on them because they're actually a
couple of bucks cheaper there than at NAPA.
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Old 06-08-2004, 08:17 AM   #11 (permalink)
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how many volts can a coil handle

THANKS
Thanks for the education on the coil.
Tim
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Old 06-08-2004, 09:51 AM   #12 (permalink)
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how many volts can a coil handle

HI ALL
Just thought I'd let Ya"ll see some of the other replys I receved from the 385 site..
Tim
************************************************** ********
The primary (12V) side of the coil is often boosted as high as 250V by aftermarket ignition systems. As long as you don't dwell too long, you can run pretty damn high voltages on the primary (creating significantly higher voltages on the secondary).

Up to about 50VDC, I wouldn't even give it a second thought...it'll be fine.

Byron




Coils can handle upwars of 700 volt, (that's right), 700 volts as long as the amperage is only milliamps. Standard production Electronic ignitions can sometimes supply 350 to 400 volts momentarily. Aftermarket CD type ignitions can go upwards of 575 volts and multiple times, too. AMPERAGE is the limiting factor when the life expectancy of an ignition is the concern.



A coil is designed to operate at 12 to 14.5 volts. You should have no problem with it. The voltage would not hurt it at any rate, the load or resistance of the coil windings will determine how much amperage the coil can withstand without burning out.
Perry.
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Old 06-08-2004, 04:20 PM   #13 (permalink)
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how many volts can a coil handle

Quote:
On 2004-06-08 09:51, pedal2themetal45 wrote:
HI ALL
Just thought I'd let Ya"ll see some of the other replys I receved from the 385 site..
Tim
************************************************** ********
The primary (12V) side of the coil is often boosted as high as 250V by aftermarket ignition systems. As long as you don't dwell too long, you can run pretty damn high voltages on the primary (creating significantly higher voltages on the secondary).

Up to about 50VDC, I wouldn't even give it a second thought...it'll be fine.

Byron




Coils can handle upwars of 700 volt, (that's right), 700 volts as long as the amperage is only milliamps. Standard production Electronic ignitions can sometimes supply 350 to 400 volts momentarily. Aftermarket CD type ignitions can go upwards of 575 volts and multiple times, too. AMPERAGE is the limiting factor when the life expectancy of an ignition is the concern.



A coil is designed to operate at 12 to 14.5 volts. You should have no problem with it. The voltage would not hurt it at any rate, the load or resistance of the coil windings will determine how much amperage the coil can withstand without burning out.
Perry.
************************************************** *********
It may be possible that these certian types of coils can handle that much primary voltage, but these responses are full of bad info. For instance, they say that amperage is the deciding factor and not voltage. Well guess what...I = V/R so if voltage goes from 12 V to 250 V, I (current) goes up proportionally and a 12V primary coil goes poof!

A coil is s step-up transformer. The step-up value is the number of secondary windings divided by the number of primary windings. If this is 1000 to 1, 12 Volts turns into 12,000 volts and the current on secondary winding is inversly proportional (1/1000 of the primary winding max). Current is not what causes the electricity to jump the plug gap, it's voltage.

Not only that, the dielectric will break down and begin to conduct electricity when the secondary voltage gets too high. So if you put 250 V on the primary and you get 250,000 volts on the secondary, the dielectric breaks down and conducts electricity and the 250,000 volts gets internally dissipated inside the coil. This all happens instantly. All that power inside the coil will fry it.

Look out for bad info.

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[ This Message was edited by: blkfrd on 6/9/04 4:21am ]
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Old 06-08-2004, 05:31 PM   #14 (permalink)
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how many volts can a coil handle

Tracy is right, I've seen coils blow the top off from too much voltage from a bad regulator. More voltage generates more heat. period.
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Old 06-09-2004, 08:34 AM   #15 (permalink)
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how many volts can a coil handle

THANKS BLKFORD AND BLUESTREAK
Thats why I passed it on the more opeions the better.
Thanks again
Tim
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