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I went cruising today stop to purchase gas for $1.39 a gallon, thought it was a misprint, but it wasn't. :)
 

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I need a 3rd member for the shotrod and a friend in Oregon might have one. It will be free but the cost will be in gas to go there. I'd get to visit everyone back home while there so it works out good. Especially with the prices going down now!
 

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Deb, you just need a center section, any junkyard up there should have them readily available maybe call around and ask how much might save money not going to get one in oregon and stuff ya know?
 

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I tell ya, it is a huge blessing for us. If gas was still over $4 a gal, there is NO way I would be able to do things with my GF, seeing that she lives exactly 100 miles away. Even at $1.71/gal (I have to run 93 octane in both vehicles) it's still expensive but it's a heck of a lot better than $4.07...or for the diesel truck $4.91. Paid over $5/gal for the F250 a while back. Down to $2.55 now which is still a dollar too high.
 

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Deb, you just need a center section, any junkyard up there should have them readily available maybe call around and ask how much might save money not going to get one in oregon and stuff ya know?
It takes me about exactly 2 tanks of gas to go to oregon and back which right now would be under $75 with an 18 gal tank. Last time I was home in June I left the same day my dad got back from vacation so figured that it would be a good time to visit as it's been a year since I saw him.
Last time I was there it was $150 for gas! Big difference!

Psig:
I need a 3rd member for an open 3.00:1 nine inch rear end, 28 spline. The good thing is those should be everywhere since most people want a 3.50 or something for racing or whatever. Heck the only time I've seen the tires smoke on the shotrod since I've owned it was Saturday and I wasn't even the one at the wheel and it was jacked up and digging a hole in the driveway at FE's. LOL Shows what a hotrod I am! LOL
 

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So, like, I'm thinking, as long as gas is cheap, we should organize some FM cross country cruises? If we can get enough people interested, we could all cruise to some place and have a meet. Those who travel from far away can meet those along the way, until we meet up at some point. I know it's crazy, but, until now, it was also unaffordable!
 

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While we certainly all appreciate having to pay less for fuel once again than anytime in recent memory, I want to ask how many of us learned anything about living with gas prices that were 3X what they are running today and are continuing to apply what we've learned?

The movement within American culture toward being more aware of our wastefulness, not only of fuel, but many of our resources overall was never a priority for the mainstream until it hit us in the wallet with gas at near $5.00 a gallon.

This awareness I believe, is a good thing. Many of the industrial efficiencies that cause things to be cheap in our country ultimately promoted waste and over consumption across the board and are tied directly to the fact that we've had cheap fuel for so long.

My family learned a lot over the past summer and have adjusted a lot of the ways we do things and how we eat too. America's food supply is a petroleum driven from production to packaging and is seriously void of the elements needed to be healthy

We can attribute what we've learned to making ourselves aware of how cheap fuel is tied to so many habits, behaviors, and practices that are not efficient and not healthy - the effort to learn was brought about in our house absolutely as a result of seeing fuel costs and all the things they effect triple in less than 1 year.

I hope that we as a household were on the backside of the adoption curve for these improved practices and that many others were ahead of us, now that fuel has dropped and other deflationary trends are set in.

So, in some ways, I am sad to see that fuel prices have dropped off so much, so fast. It was a great learning experience that some may have missed.
 

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So, like, I'm thinking, as long as gas is cheap, we should organize some FM cross country cruises? If we can get enough people interested, we could all cruise to some place and have a meet. Those who travel from far away can meet those along the way, until we meet up at some point. I know it's crazy, but, until now, it was also unaffordable!
Kinda like the hotrod power tour. lol
 

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It's not going to be this low long enough that's for sure. They are cutting production to raise prices. But I'll enjoy it while I can. I never go far anyway and usually a tank full will last me at the very least, 2 weeks.
But for others that have to drive to work etc it's great right now.
 

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While we certainly all appreciate having to pay less for fuel once again than anytime in recent memory, I want to ask how many of us learned anything about living with gas prices that were 3X what they are running today and are continuing to apply what we've learned?

The movement within American culture toward being more aware of our wastefulness, not only of fuel, but many of our resources overall was never a priority for the mainstream until it hit us in the wallet with gas at near $5.00 a gallon.

This awareness I believe, is a good thing. Many of the industrial efficiencies that cause things to be cheap in our country ultimately promoted waste and over consumption across the board and are tied directly to the fact that we've had cheap fuel for so long.

My family learned a lot over the past summer and have adjusted a lot of the ways we do things and how we eat too. America's food supply is a petroleum driven from production to packaging and is seriously void of the elements needed to be healthy

We can attribute what we've learned to making ourselves aware of how cheap fuel is tied to so many habits, behaviors, and practices that are not efficient and not healthy - the effort to learn was brought about in our house absolutely as a result of seeing fuel costs and all the things they effect triple in less than 1 year.

I hope that we as a household were on the backside of the adoption curve for these improved practices and that many others were ahead of us, now that fuel has dropped and other deflationary trends are set in.

So, in some ways, I am sad to see that fuel prices have dropped off so much, so fast. It was a great learning experience that some may have missed.
Mass Transit for daily commuting, and cars for pleasure cruising ~

Everyone, now, sing along! ~ Varoooooom! :)
 

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While we certainly all appreciate having to pay less for fuel once again than anytime in recent memory, I want to ask how many of us learned anything about living with gas prices that were 3X what they are running today and are continuing to apply what we've learned?

The movement within American culture toward being more aware of our wastefulness, not only of fuel, but many of our resources overall was never a priority for the mainstream until it hit us in the wallet with gas at near $5.00 a gallon.

This awareness I believe, is a good thing. Many of the industrial efficiencies that cause things to be cheap in our country ultimately promoted waste and over consumption across the board and are tied directly to the fact that we've had cheap fuel for so long.

My family learned a lot over the past summer and have adjusted a lot of the ways we do things and how we eat too. America's food supply is a petroleum driven from production to packaging and is seriously void of the elements needed to be healthy

We can attribute what we've learned to making ourselves aware of how cheap fuel is tied to so many habits, behaviors, and practices that are not efficient and not healthy - the effort to learn was brought about in our house absolutely as a result of seeing fuel costs and all the things they effect triple in less than 1 year.

I hope that we as a household were on the backside of the adoption curve for these improved practices and that many others were ahead of us, now that fuel has dropped and other deflationary trends are set in.

So, in some ways, I am sad to see that fuel prices have dropped off so much, so fast. It was a great learning experience that some may have missed.
Very true, I have to agree wholeheartedly.

Seems as though the attitude of many Americans is that since the price is down I can now drive more. Which brings the amount we are spending back to where it was a few months ago. So why was everyone bitching about the high price of fuel in the first place? Rather than wasting more I would think it would be a good time to take advantage of the lower prices and save some money or make those mortgage payments. Something most were not able to do before or so we were led to believe.

If anyone has noticed, the oil prices have been following the market. When the market has a good day the price of crude goes up. With this kind of price relation we should hope that the market doesn't go up. What does that say for the economy? The only way we can keep prices down is by conservation. Like it or not.
The more we conserve the more stable the prices will become. Hopefully. Maybe heating and utilities will also follow suit.

I truly hope we didn't miss the boat for the umpteenth time. All the talk and hoopla about alternative sources of energy and fuel efficient vehicles has seemed to have faded away in the back ground. I've lived through this same scenario through the seventies, eighties, nineties and now the present and this country has yet to do anything to solve the problem. Just hold our breath and hope it goes away.

Like the man said, wake up America and get your head out your ass.
 
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