Ford Muscle Cars Tech Forum banner

1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,010 Posts
I bet he does!!! Give him the keys and walk the floor until he returns or fake a malfunction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,520 Posts
The issue isn't what he wants...it's who his friends are and what he'll do to impress them. Can you honestly say he will not drink or speed.

If it was me, I'd loan him the car 2 or 3 times, before the Prom. A short trip, by himself to go to the store or maybe to have it washed...then maybe to take a date to the Mall or Movie and finally maybe all day on a weekend. Any excuses, bad behavior would be noted and figure into whether or not he can have the car to go to the Prom. But thats just me. You know your kids better than anyone else.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,416 Posts
You know there's 2 things you never lend out ,Your car or your woman because you know how they'll come back.
Maybe you could offer to drive him there in a chauffer outfit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,154 Posts
If you trust him, let him have it. Only you can say for sure. If it were my kid, and I thought he had a decent head on his shoulders I wouldnt hesitate.

Besides, thats what insurance is for
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,164 Posts
Peer presure has caused a lot of good kids to make bad decisions. You can replace the car, but that is not the major concern. I think you should make a decision that you are comfortable with. Use you maturity and consider all factors involved.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,658 Posts
I agree with the rest of the people, and as a 19 year old, I can say, if you trust him, give him the keys and give him the "I'm watching you" look.

If you don't, you can either flat out say no or soften it by saying "Gee, I'm having it waxed that day.

Hold his car in escrow (if he has one) if you say yes.

But I do know as parents how impossible it is to trust someone that age completely, simply because you don't know but if he hasn't given you any sort of trouble before, chances are he won't screw it up.

I also know how hard it is to make parents trust you completely, even IF you have never done anything untrustworty. Its just part of the job. The kid wants you to trust him, and if you think you can, give him a chance to prove you right, not wrong.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,741 Posts
It depends, like thekingofazle I am a young guy too (20) and I know that my dad would have let me drive it if it was his. Hell, he even lets me ride his harley, but then again I let him drive my mustang. It is all a matter of trust. My brother is a different story and is really not trusted with anything of much value. Remember all kids are different and you have the best knowledge of who he is and what he does in situations that carry a high amount of responsibility.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
I'M A OLDER GUY (52) AND IHAVE A 16YR OLD SON. I BOUGHT HIM A 94 MUSTANG GT THAT WE'VE PUT A COWL
HOOD AND BOLT ON PERFORMANCE PARTS ON. EVERYONE
ASK ME IF I LOST MY MIND BUYING HIM THIS CAR AND HELPING HIM MODIFY IT. MY RESPONSE IS, I'VE HAD LONG TALKS ABOUT THE RESPONSIBILITY OF DRIVING THIS CAR AND THE COST OF INSURANCE AND THAT HE WILL FOOT THE BILL FOR ANY INSURANCE INCREASES DUE TO HIS DRIVING.
MY SON IS BASICALLY A RESPONSIBLE KID AND LISTENS
WHEN WE HAVE DISCUSSONS, PROBABLY BECAUSE I TRY TO TALK TO HIM AS A ADULT RATHER THAN A CHILD.
THE TRUST I PLACE IN HIM AND THE WORKING ON THE CAR TOGETHER HAVE KEPT US CLOSE WHEN I SEE OTHER PARENTS LOSING TOUCH WITH THEIR KIDS.
BOTTOM LINE IF YOUR SON IS A GOOD KID AND YOU TRUST HIM TO BE RESPONSIBLE, GIVE HIM A CHANCE AND LET HIM HAVE TO CAR FOR PROM NIGHT.
LIKE PREVIOUS RESPONSE THATS WHAT INSURANCE IS FOR AND THE TRUST AND LINE OF COMMUNICATION THAT YOU WILL ESTABLISH MAY COME INTO PLAY ON SOMETHING A LOT MORE IMPORTANT THAN A CAR THAT IS REPLACEABLE!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,520 Posts
California has solved that dilemma for parents. Anyone under 18 cannot drive without an adult or carry passengers until they have completed a year of driving and an approved driving course. I think the legal driving age has been raised (except for farm kids) to 16 1/2, which comes with a further restriction of only being allowed to school, work or approved destinations and no after dark driving. In California, legally, he couldn't give his friends a ride to school.

No wonder kids don't know anything anymore...seems they are regulating ignorance into kids. They can't hurt themselves if they don't take chances...well they will never learn anything if you never trust them. The issue is easily resolved by allowing the parent the decision. If the decide wrong, then the parents should be libel for cleaning up the mess their kid and their decision caused. What I see it a lot of parents want their kids to have opportunities, earlier...but when the crap hits the fan, these parents want to explain it all away by saying that kids make mistakes, serious matters are not always so easily dropped. True, kids make a mistakes; .that is why they have parents, to teach them, guide them and control them...until they learn how to take control for their own actions.

I still say you should decide when your kid is ready to handle a high powered car, without direct, in the car, parental supervision. But I also think that giving that kind of freedom, without a demonstrated track record is way too much temptation (the "cure" for temptation is a proven habit of doing the right thing, making mature decisions). The idea is to set the kid up in a way that it is easier to do the right thing than to make the wrong choice.

Tossing the keys to a Mustang on Prom Night to a 16 year old...seems like a lot of trust, not enough track record. Put it this way, if everyone made sure I couldn't get a cigarette - we could stop smoking pretty easy. but as soon as they are available, with out anyone guiding your decision, its a whole new ball game. If anything, its more tempting, cause you never really had to make the decision before. The decision to smoke, drink, use drugs or do something stupid in a car...all are choices. The worse part about them is they are choice that you make constantly as long as you are exposed to them. Every time you pull up to a stop sign, traffic light or another car...you have to make a conscious decision to speed or not. The one time that you make the wrong choice could be the one that gets you a ticket or worse. The 99.9999% of the times you did the right thing, don't really count. What predicts present and future behavior is past behavior. Establish a habit of doing the right things, making the right decisions, before putting even a good, level-headed kid in the position of making a constant series of right decisions.

_________________
"They that can give up essential Liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither Liberty nor safety"-- Benjamin Franklin


<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Beoweolf on 4/30/06 12:23am ]</font>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,301 Posts
If it were me, (and this might seem sort of "big brother&quot
I would place some sort of recording device in the car somewhere and let him have free reign of the car before prom to let him "get used to it". Then watch or listen to what you have recorded. Trust is a touchy subject. I truely believe that it can be given in some instances and must be EARNED in others. This is one of the times I believe it must be earned. My mother thanks me all the time for being such a good kid growing up. That is because I was carefull and knew how to push the envelope without tearing it, but believe me, I pushed that envelope! I never got caught however, which is why it came out alright. Once me and my friends got in a car together it was a real blast. Only a blast a 16-17 yr old kid could have. Enough said. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
596 Posts
Well, I was a good kid as well, no ticket's, didn't drink, had pretty good friends but when mom let me use her 78 Vette for Homecoming that didn't detour me from doing doughtnuts in it on our football field and making laps around our high school track at 1 am in the moring. Luckly no issues occured..what the hell was i thinking then. I'm 31 now and really see how easily peer pressure affected me then. my 02....
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
814 Posts
On 2006-04-29 11:04, ga289stocker wrote:
Well, I was a good kid as well, no ticket's, didn't drink, had pretty good friends but when mom let me use her 78 Vette for Homecoming that didn't detour me from doing doughtnuts in it on our football field and making laps around our high school track at 1 am in the moring. Luckly no issues occured..what the hell was i thinking then. I'm 31 now and really see how easily peer pressure affected me then. my 02....


Damn dude!!! That is the kind of story that makes it real hard for 63SportsCoupe to cough up the keys.

Sounds like it wasn't the most brilliant idea in the world, but I bet it was fun.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,340 Posts
On 2006-04-29 12:27, FEandGoingBroke wrote:
Oh you know he's going to cough them up... Come on guy's! He's going to TRY to Get Some on that night and how better to do it than in a Mustang???



FE
you been in a new mustang? built in birth control I'd say
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,658 Posts
On 2006-04-29 12:27, FEandGoingBroke wrote:
Oh you know he's going to cough them up... Come on guy's! He's going to TRY to Get Some on that night and how better to do it than in a Mustang???

Don't jump to conclusions FE. Some of us teenage guys are decent. Maybe I just have no fun.


I think doing burnouts/doughnuts is silly and just destructive, both for the car and for whatever you're doing it on.

Trust me, cars don't add that much to someones appeal. Ask me how I know.


As for being a lot of freedom, sure it is. And as for him not having a track record, good or bad... How could he without an opportunity? This sounds like a good one to me.

Now, I don't like the video camera idea, he deserves privacy... but that doesn't mean you cant check things like mileage, rubber content, paternity tests, etc.


Plus the new mustangs have so much traction control a burnout or doughnuts would be an accomplishment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,341 Posts
On 2006-04-28 20:29, Luv70sFords wrote:
If you trust him, let him have it. Only you can say for sure. If it were my kid, and I thought he had a decent head on his shoulders I wouldnt hesitate.

Besides, thats what insurance is for
As usual you and I are in total agreement, bud....
Kids are killed in minivans more often that performance cars due to errors in driving. Speed is relative whether you're trying to outrun a train to a crossing or another car to an intersection. If your son is halfway responsible otherwise, let him enjoy Prom evening.

Jan
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top