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I’ve got a 1960 F350 with a 223 cu in 3.7L I6 that was my great grandfather’s that my father recently brought home from my grandfather’s backyard where it sat for 18+ years. The original goal was to restore it as much as possible but I’m looking for another opinion because I’m in a bit of a bind at this point.

I put a new battery in it, changed the oil and filter, spark plugs and ignition coil wires and tried to start it and got nothing. Checked power to the starter, starter solenoid and ignition switch and had battery voltage on all and I could jump the starter off so knew the starter was operating. Changed the starter solenoid and got no change, then changed the ignition coil and still got no change. Found really bad corrosion on a lot of the wiring so I overlayed wiring for the ignition switch to the starter solenoid and ignition coil, as well as replaced my battery cables. I finally starting getting the truck to turn over but sounded like it wasn’t firing. So started checking for spark and couldn’t get any with a spark tester. Finally changed the points and condenser and now starting to get spark. However my cranking did not sound any better. I tried some starter fluid into the carb and it’ll fire off but then make a really bad grinding sound while trying to start (I assume it’s starter hanging up since I’m still trying to crank the truck). I have checked that my fuel is pulling all the way up to the carberator even though I cannot get the little injector or jet (my carberator knowledge is a little lower as I work on newer vehicles) to squirt fuel into the carberator. Figured carberator might need to be cleaned so I pulled it off and found a good amount of rust inside the intake manifold (attached a picture of the rust inside the manifold). At this point I’m wondering if this engine is likely done for due to rust inside of the engine or if it is likely okay and I should just continue on the path I’m on. As well as if I continue replacing parts, what else should I be checking for because I’m a bit lost at this point.
 

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I’ve got a 1960 F350 with a 223 cu in 3.7L I6 that was my great grandfather’s that my father recently brought home from my grandfather’s backyard where it sat for 18+ years. The original goal was to restore it as much as possible but I’m looking for another opinion because I’m in a bit of a bind at this point.

I put a new battery in it, changed the oil and filter, spark plugs and ignition coil wires and tried to start it and got nothing. Checked power to the starter, starter solenoid and ignition switch and had battery voltage on all and I could jump the starter off so knew the starter was operating. Changed the starter solenoid and got no change, then changed the ignition coil and still got no change. Found really bad corrosion on a lot of the wiring so I overlayed wiring for the ignition switch to the starter solenoid and ignition coil, as well as replaced my battery cables. I finally starting getting the truck to turn over but sounded like it wasn’t firing. So started checking for spark and couldn’t get any with a spark tester. Finally changed the points and condenser and now starting to get spark. However my cranking did not sound any better. I tried some starter fluid into the carb and it’ll fire off but then make a really bad grinding sound while trying to start (I assume it’s starter hanging up since I’m still trying to crank the truck). I have checked that my fuel is pulling all the way up to the carberator even though I cannot get the little injector or jet (my carberator knowledge is a little lower as I work on newer vehicles) to squirt fuel into the carberator. Figured carberator might need to be cleaned so I pulled it off and found a good amount of rust inside the intake manifold (attached a picture of the rust inside the manifold). At this point I’m wondering if this engine is likely done for due to rust inside of the engine or if it is likely okay and I should just continue on the path I’m on. As well as if I continue replacing parts, what else should I be checking for because I’m a bit lost at this point.
Hello FredF350,

If I may ask, what is your specific goal with the truck? I am a little confused. You say you wanted to restore the truck, by that very definition that means taking it completely apart, taking meticulous notes and pictures then refurbishing and or replacing every part and reassembling like it rolled off the production line. If that's truly the case just start with that process and when it comes to the engine it will need to be disassembled anyway and a machine shop can ascertain any extent of any damage and whether you need to find another block or he can work with the one you have.

But it sounds more like you just want to fix it up and get it running. If that's the case and you just want to ascertain if it's worth getting it running here's a suggestion. Fix the starter first. It's hard to diagnose with so little information, but it sounds like you'll have to remove it and free up the Bendix. I've never worked on this model Ford engine, but it probably has the inertial style Ford starter I would imagine. If the rust on the engine is any indication of the rest of the trucks parts, chances are the Bendix is stuck.

Once you have the starter in proper operational order you can remove all the spark plugs, hold the throttle wide open and do a dynamic compression check on all the cylinders. The PSI readings should be within 10% of each other. If they are not, then you'll have to tear the engine down to fix the internal damage or relegate the entire engine to a proper machining and overhaul.

If the compression check shows low compression then there's no point in going further trying to get it to start.

Another note about the rust inside the intake, it looks like surface rust from the picture, but if it's chunky or flaky don't try to start the engine as one piece could score a valve and seat or scratch the cylinder wall prematurely.

Good luck.
 

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I’ve got a 1960 F350 with a 223 cu in 3.7L I6 that was my great grandfather’s that my father recently brought home from my grandfather’s backyard where it sat for 18+ years. The original goal was to restore it as much as possible but I’m looking for another opinion because I’m in a bit of a bind at this point.

I put a new battery in it, changed the oil and filter, spark plugs and ignition coil wires and tried to start it and got nothing. Checked power to the starter, starter solenoid and ignition switch and had battery voltage on all and I could jump the starter off so knew the starter was operating. Changed the starter solenoid and got no change, then changed the ignition coil and still got no change. Found really bad corrosion on a lot of the wiring so I overlayed wiring for the ignition switch to the starter solenoid and ignition coil, as well as replaced my battery cables. I finally starting getting the truck to turn over but sounded like it wasn’t firing. So started checking for spark and couldn’t get any with a spark tester. Finally changed the points and condenser and now starting to get spark. However my cranking did not sound any better. I tried some starter fluid into the carb and it’ll fire off but then make a really bad grinding sound while trying to start (I assume it’s starter hanging up since I’m still trying to crank the truck). I have checked that my fuel is pulling all the way up to the carberator even though I cannot get the little injector or jet (my carberator knowledge is a little lower as I work on newer vehicles) to squirt fuel into the carberator. Figured carberator might need to be cleaned so I pulled it off and found a good amount of rust inside the intake manifold (attached a picture of the rust inside the manifold). At this point I’m wondering if this engine is likely done for due to rust inside of the engine or if it is likely okay and I should just continue on the path I’m on. As well as if I continue replacing parts, what else should I be checking for because I’m a bit lost at this point.
Hello FredF350,

If I may ask, what is your specific goal with the truck? I am a little confused. You say you wanted to restore the truck, by that very definition that means taking it completely apart, taking meticulous notes and pictures then refurbishing and or replacing every part and reassembling like it rolled off the production line. If that's truly the case just start with that process and when it comes to the engine it will need to be disassembled anyway and a machine shop can ascertain any extent of any damage and whether you need to find another block or he can work with the one you have.

But it sounds more like you just want to fix it up and get it running. If that's the case and you just want to ascertain if it's worth getting it running here's a suggestion. Fix the starter first. It's hard to diagnose with so little information, but it sounds like you'll have to remove it and free up the Bendix. I've never worked on this model Ford engine, but it probably has the inertial style Ford starter I would imagine. If the rust on the engine is any indication of the rest of the trucks parts, chances are the Bendix is stuck.

Once you have the starter in proper operational order you can remove all the spark plugs, hold the throttle wide open and do a dynamic compression check on all the cylinders. The PSI readings should be within 10% of each other. If they are not, then you'll have to tear the engine down to fix the internal damage or relegate the entire engine to a proper machining and overhaul.

If the compression check shows low compression then there's no point in going further trying to get it to start.

Another note about the rust inside the intake, it looks like surface rust from the picture, but if it's chunky or flaky don't try to start the engine as one piece could score a valve and seat or scratch the cylinder wall prematurely.

Good luck.
I think if it was me I would do a compression test before I went any farther . sounds like a cool old truck
My apologies, should have been more clear on the restoration part. The goal is to get it running and use it as a farm truck.

I’ll have to get a compression tester that will work on this engine and get back to you on that. But I’ll get started on taking the starter off and checking the bendix to see if it is stuck.

Thank you for the advice, and sorry for the delayed response, been moving and checking my posts wasn’t even on my mind at the time.
 
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