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Almost any spindle from a full-size Ford, Mercury or Lincoln of that generation should work (ie: fit on there) but where you run into issues is with tie rod length or shape. If you're set on going with period-correct parts for the conversion, there are a lot of posts written on it where there is some experimentation to get front end geometry right. Otherwise...Wilwood or Leeds would be my suggestion.

Great car, btw!!
 

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I have a 1965 LTD. Want to put disc brakes on the front.
Will 1966 Thunderbird spindles work for a disc brake conversion?
Or will 69 Galaxie spindles?
View attachment 175035
Hello S1b,

1965 to 1968 full size (Custom/500, Galaxie 500/XL/LTD, and later the XL and LTD) all have the same front end components. The 1968 T Bird also uses the same spindles as these cars. So if you want factory Ford disc brakes, my suggestion is find the a set of disc brakes from a 1968 full size (most likely XL or LTD) or T-Bird. The 1968 Disc brakes are the easiest and least expensive disc brakes to R&R. I've restored two of these sets and retrofitted a 1966 galaxie 500 XL that came with power drum brakes to 1968 front disc brakes (easy peasy). There are no fitment problems or alignment problems. If you use a spindle from the next generation of Ford full size (1969-1974) they will not just bolt in and even if you manage to finagle them on there the Ackermann Angle will be off because that generation full size is 2" longer in wheel base than the 65-68.

Hope that helps.

Cheers
 

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I have a 1965 LTD. Want to put disc brakes on the front.
Will 1966 Thunderbird spindles work for a disc brake conversion?
Or will 69 Galaxie spindles?
View attachment 175035
Honestly Id get a conversion kit from either jegs or summit. I got mine from Summit. I got a master cly and booster and wilwood disk conversion kit. I also used cooper/zink brake line. I love that stuff. Its so easy to work with. You wont regret it.
 

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When looking at piecing the various parts for a "ford salvage" disc conversion, a few things made that less desirable and convenient than just buying a Leeds or Wilwood kit off-the-shelf.

For me it was:
  • No real pick and pulls around here, and anything there will be rusted and seized at this point (in New England)
  • Anything I could find at those places (IF they had the particular Fords I needed), would need extensive refurb or rebuilding (more money in parts to do that)
  • If those parts turned out to be unsalvageable, I'm looking at digging for more or scrapping everything I found and going aftermarket anyway
  • If you find those parts online, they are hideously expensive (for no reason, imo)
  • You need new rotors for anything you build. Using a rusty rotor from an unknown car sitting in a field is an absolute no-no. And the rotors for those older Fords are stupidly expensive, from what I've seen, especially the recommended Lincoln stuff.
  • Lastly were possible fitment issues. You may need to play with tie rod length and shape when it's all done to get geometry correct.

So all in all...why not spend the money on a GOOD aftermarket kit that bolts right on? This is opening a few boxes and swapping out parts, usually an afternoon's worth of work if you have everything you need on-hand. I can almost guarantee you it won't be more expensive to go this route after all the receipts are tallied.

Want to stay with "factory parts" doesn't keep the car "period correct" because the car in question didn't come with those other parts on it from the factory. You're still Frankensteining the brakes on it.

Sorry for the rant, I just don't see the benefit in using old parts for brake "upgrades".
 

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1968 FORD Galaxie 500
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When looking at piecing the various parts for a "ford salvage" disc conversion, a few things made that less desirable and convenient than just buying a Leeds or Wilwood kit off-the-shelf.

For me it was:
  • No real pick and pulls around here, and anything there will be rusted and seized at this point (in New England)
  • Anything I could find at those places (IF they had the particular Fords I needed), would need extensive refurb or rebuilding (more money in parts to do that)
  • If those parts turned out to be unsalvageable, I'm looking at digging for more or scrapping everything I found and going aftermarket anyway
  • If you find those parts online, they are hideously expensive (for no reason, imo)
  • You need new rotors for anything you build. Using a rusty rotor from an unknown car sitting in a field is an absolute no-no. And the rotors for those older Fords are stupidly expensive, from what I've seen, especially the recommended Lincoln stuff.
  • Lastly were possible fitment issues. You may need to play with tie rod length and shape when it's all done to get geometry correct.

So all in all...why not spend the money on a GOOD aftermarket kit that bolts right on? This is opening a few boxes and swapping out parts, usually an afternoon's worth of work if you have everything you need on-hand. I can almost guarantee you it won't be more expensive to go this route after all the receipts are tallied.

Want to stay with "factory parts" doesn't keep the car "period correct" because the car in question didn't come with those other parts on it from the factory. You're still Frankensteining the brakes on it.

Sorry for the rant, I just don't see the benefit in using old parts for brake "upgrades".


Hi Tony...
You are really speaking the truth. In the end it's really about safety and functionality.

I agree, who cares if you source non-original parts from another model FORD or just buy a well engineered aftermarket brake kit? I am even taking the next step in this process with our 1968 G-500. I've been acquiring all the parts needed for a all-in-one, complete suspension, brake wheel and tire retrofit. Out with the old (and worn) and in with the NEW!! If you spend 30k to restore the looks, why not upgrade those areas that you can?

In searching for 3rd party systems, there seems to many "options" for a driveway restoration team (family) to go. It is foolish and ultimately a waste of time chasing the Ford purist folly. At the end of the day and your life, will you have more or less fun with the old inferior designed "old school" factory brakes, or the modern design kit on your vintage car? A great handling car is not just a joy to drive, it just works better.

I also look it this way... when the moment arrives at 70 mph, what system will avoid the road hazard and stop your 4K pound missile faster? It's your life and the those with you. You've got three seconds to make your decision, Go!

Tire Wheel Car Vehicle Land vehicle


I just love the look or our 68', it would be a shame to see her all crumpled up in a ball.
Cheers, PSR.
 
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