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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's been a while since I last posted progress on my Galaxie. That doesn't mean I haven't been working on it. Quite the contrary - I've been so busy that I haven't had time to post. Plus I've got a lot in progress and not finished yet. Here is one thing I completed recently.

My car originally came with the two-tone turquoise interior. Somewhere along the line it got changed to a two tone tan. It probably looked good at one point, but not any more. I started on the seats first but the reproduction seat covers have been delayed to a mid-April ship date. While waiting, I decided to tackle the dashboard.

The dash pads had been covered with a tan vinyl. They were in pretty good shape but a bit faded. And in the wrong color. I didn't want to spend the money on new or rebuilt pads so I decided to dye the ones I had. The metal part of the dash and the steering column had been painted (and poorly!) in tan.

This is pretty basic refinishing steps, so I won't get into a lot of detail.

I used Scott Drake vinyl dye, in Ford's dark turquoise color. This will match the dark turquoise part of the seats but I think it is a little darker than the original dash color. But it was readily available since it's used on Mustangs. I bought two cans from Summit, plus the vinyl cleaner. I used the dye on both the vinyl and the metal dash. I've done this before with success - the vinyl dye adheres well to a good, clean, primed surface.

Here's as close to "before" pics as I have. I often jump into projects and forget to take pics. You can see how much the vinyl had faded, and where I started to sand off some of the tan paint.





Metal dash sanded, masked, and ready for primer.


Primed.


No in-process pics, but after priming I removed the upper masking and masked off the trim strip, windshield, etc. Then sprayed the wide pad and the metal dash.


Gauge hood pad before. You can see the fading etc.


After first coat. Vinyl dye wants to go on in very thin coats. I did 3-4 coats on all of these parts to get complete, even coverage. Unfortunately I forgot to take pics of the other coats.


I also painted the upper, visible, part of the steering column and the Grant steering wheel adapter. The original visors had been dyed tan so I cleaned and prepped them for the dark turquoise dye. I also removed and sprayed the lower dash bezel, which I had previously replaced with a beat up black one. Finished results after unmasking and reassembly:




Not 100% original, and not the most thorough way to redo a dashboard but I'm super happy with the color and the end result.

- John
 

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Looks great! I did a whole dash pad replacement on my 66 LTD last year, with a big thread about it. Your original pad was in really good shape, that speaker grill looks nearly flawless, mine was so beat I chose to get the repro dash pad and pod and did many of the steps with vinyl dye that you had to do. Good job masking in place.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
FoMoCo,

The '65-'72 parts and accessories manual has a note that for all but the convertible body styles, that trim piece is '65/'66 only. That note is not on the convertible diagram so it appears to be the same part for '65-'68 convertibles.

- John
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
jd,

Thanks for the kind feedback. I read your thread and checked out all of your pics a couple of weeks ago. I had your car and work in mind when I was thinking about the RIGHT way to do this. That was excellent work but I wasn't ready to go through that whole process. Luckily the custom sewn vinyl covering on mine was still intact so the dye was an option.

Like many of these things, the masking took longer than the spraying! Hopefully my surface preparation was good and the dye will hold up well.

- John
 
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