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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Many 1960’s cars held leaves, pine needles, dust, and debris at the bottoms of the fenders and in the lower cowl boxes, and that stuff holds moisture and eventually rusts the car from the inside out. This one was no different. Here, the original rusty panels are drilled and removed, and repair panels are fabricated and welded in place.











The new front piece welded in



And the new side piece attached.

 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
Like most old cars, there were numerous holes in the cabin floor. The crew assessed each one, and fabricated steel repair panels where needed. These were made by hand using hammer and dolly techniques, the Mittler brothers bead roller, and other tricks of the trade.





They were butt welded in with an HTP MIG 200 welder, and the edges were metal finished, so that they were not visible when finished. New brackets were fabricated were necessary as well.









 

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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
The Galaxie’s body was then mounted on the body jig using the original body mount locations. This will keep the body square and true as the crew enters the next phase of sheet metal repairs.









The rusty rear wheel tubs were removed in preparation for the installation of our replacement tubs, and eventual quarter panel repairs.



 

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Discussion Starter · #46 ·
The rear tail panel was riddled with rust holes, so Adam removed the piece by way of the factory seams and spot welds.

Note the cross brace bolted in to keep the body dimensions intact.



Adam begins by forming the inner structure.



This is a compound bend, and he used the Mittler Brothers box / pan brake along with some square tube stock to form the piece.



Comparing to the original..



If any one of the bends or dimensions is incorrect, the whole panel is useless and a new piece must be made.



It’s starting to look like the original…





Cleaning the body of rust, scale, and torn welds to accept the new panel.



These areas are reconstructed with new steel.



Test fitting…

 

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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
Next up for repair were the quarter panels. The quarters were dented, rusty, and were repaired previously. The crew searched for a decent pair of take-off quarters from a clean donor car, but determined that the available parts were in need of as much repair as the ones already on the car. Some reproduction panels were sourced and purchased.



However, the wheel lip contour was not very accurate, so the new panel needed to be re-shaped to match the original.



Adam spent time with an air hammer with a soft-edge hammer and a dolley to push the lip into the required shape.





After the shape was corrected, the original quarter panel was measured in various locations to ensure that the new panel was installed in the proper location.



It was determined easier to install the new panel in two parts rather than one large panel.

 

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Discussion Starter · #53 ·
The original steel was removed, but the original “Galaxie” trim holes were left intact.





The new panels were test-fitted and removed for additional tweaking many times.



Cleco clamps were used to hold the panels in place during fitting, and the restored wheel tubs were also in place to test the fit.





When the fit was acceptable, the panels were held in place with Eastwood panel clamps and it was tack welded together.





After tacking and grinding, the panel repair is nearly complete.







 

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Discussion Starter · #56 ·
Behind the scenes, trimming away the remaining rusty steel.





The panels are further worked on the bench to remove the low areas, hammer dings, and to refine the shape.



The restored wheel tub is installed, and a straight-edge steel support bar is tack-welded to the car to minimize warping when the new quarter panel is installed.





Adam welded the panels together on the bench so he could hammer them straight and finish the welds with better access to both sides of the panels.



This time, a small overlap was used to prevent warpage. When finished, both sides of the panels are fully welded and finished smooth.



 

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Thanks for the updates! Did you flange the quarter edge on the drivers side where you overlapped instead of butt welding? What does the backside treatment look like? Did the overlap technique make a significant difference over the butt weld?
 

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Discussion Starter · #59 ·
Thanks for the updates! Did you flange the quarter edge on the drivers side where you overlapped instead of butt welding? What does the backside treatment look like? Did the overlap technique make a significant difference over the butt weld?
No flanging was done. We've experienced issues with flanging panels in the past, where you stretch the metal to make the flange crease, and it can later crack.

In this case, the backside looks great, you cannot see where the repair occurred.

Here's a shot inside the trunk before all the final grinding and metal finishing was complete. Once it was finished and primed, it disappears. On this particular car, this technique added some much needed rigidity in the panels to keep them from warping. We normally butt-weld everything, but this car was tricky.

 

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Amazing work........can't wait to see the finished car!!:bow:

Roughly how long does this take and what does it cost to have an extensive restore done like this??:confused:
 
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