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Hello 70XL,

You just may get your wish on the modification of the door window regulator from manual winder to electric. I did some preliminary research and it seems it just may be possible to remove the winder portion of the regulator and weld in the motor mounting pad portion off of a regulator that uses the same motor. I don't think I have to move the regulator to the second set of mounting holes as you do with the rear quarter window ones. The rear quarter power window regulators are radically different from the manual winders and that would be a bugger to do.

Since Ford used the same power window motor for over a decade I found a cheap (read 12 bucks shipped) brand new power regulator for a truck and will slice off the section of the electric motor mount and transplant (TIG) that onto the manual winder regulator. So I bought two of the cheap truck power regulators in pretty much the same way galaxiex converted his '68 Impala to power windows.

The reason why the rear quarter windows are so different is the electric motor would otherwise be in the way of window travel. Where as with the front doors it looks like the electric motor will be off in front (under the wing window) and out of the way. If I have two modify the 4 mounting holes for the regulator to use the other set of door holes so be it, but I'm keep my fingers crossed in the meantime.

I've just about given up on finding a set of front door power regulators as I do believe the ones that are left have been pretty much plucked out by others looking to do the conversion. Not less forgetting the ones I do see now (that don't fit this car) are astronomical in price for some old turd. I know because I bought the rears for basically a kings ransom and they look like they were drudged out of a swamp.

It's funny how unpopular 4 door cars are as I paid 30 bucks each (shipped) for the power regulators for the '66 LTD 4 door hardtop.

Cheers
I`ve always wondered about this for pretty much as long as I`ve owned my 70, 36 years now. The window cranks get into the grilles of the door speakers I added all those years ago, so not having to crank the windows would avoid that conflict. The door glass is pretty big on these cars and I wonder if the regulator is different to provide different leverage, mechanical advantage for a motor vs. manual crank. I`ve never seen a power window regulator for my vintage vehicle, so I have no clue how they differ. I do have a parts car, if I want to experiment.
 

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It IS possible.... at least... I did this on a 68 Impala 4 dr sedan beater that I used to have.

My local Princess Auto store (sorta like Harbor Freight) carries surplus "stuff" and they had a whole slew of power window motors from... I don't know what...
... but they are an OEM design for :"something". I bought a bunch when they had a sale on them.

I took 2 of them and managed to mangle/mount them to the Impala front door manual window regulators.
Now, I have to say...they worked surprisingly well, even tho I was not too concerned about fit and finish.
I just kinda hacked up some brackets, drilled some holes and took apart the manual regulator and welded the gear to the motor.
Somehow stuffed it all back together and... It worked!
No-one was more surprised than me!
It all fit inside the door and you couldn't tell except for the missing window cranks.
Oh, and the switch panel I made for the center of the dash to operate the windows.


Understand, this car was a BEATER. It was severely rusted (rear window leaked BAD) but it only had 58K original miles on it, when I got it.
The original 307 2bbl and Powerglide ran like a champ!
The PG even still had the original factory fill in it (Whale oil based ATF)!!!!
I drove the car for 3 full years until it finally succumbed to the rust devil.

Here's a pic of the Impala next to an old school bus (long story)...

View attachment 166268
Yeah, Princess Auto is great, isn`t it! I`m very happy we have one here now. I always had to stop in every time I was in Saskatoon, whether I needed anything, or not. I`ve got bags of stuff I never knew I needed and still haven`t used, but I saved lots of money getting it on sale. :p :giggle:
 

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Yeah, Princess Auto is great, isn`t it! I`m very happy we have one here now. I always had to stop in every time I was in Saskatoon, whether I needed anything, or not. I`ve got bags of stuff I never knew I needed and still haven`t used, but I saved lots of money getting it on sale. :p :giggle:
Yep, they are great.... :p.... I never get out of there for less than $100.00....:rolleyes:
I too have tons of stuff I never knew I needed and still haven`t used... and saved the same as you did... o_O ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #205
I`ve always wondered about this for pretty much as long as I`ve owned my 70, 36 years now. The window cranks get into the grilles of the door speakers I added all those years ago, so not having to crank the windows would avoid that conflict. The door glass is pretty big on these cars and I wonder if the regulator is different to provide different leverage, mechanical advantage for a motor vs. manual crank. I`ve never seen a power window regulator for my vintage vehicle, so I have no clue how they differ. I do have a parts car, if I want to experiment.
Hi 70XL,

The power regulator gets the same bias spring to counter the glass weight as the manual winder regulator. The problem arises as the manual winder shaft protrudes through the door card where the hand crank is attached and the glass slides right along the otherwise flat other side of regulator. Take off the manual winder one way regulator and install a big bulbous electric motor directly on the other side and in most situations the glass will just hit the motor going down. So they redesign the power regulator to position the motor out of the way of glass travel.

I'll be sure to take pictures of the manual vs electric power window regulators for the rear quarter windows as they are quite different and of course chances are I'll be converting the front door regulators to power (plus I have spares of these manual winders) so that'll be interesting for me as well.

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #206
I actually work on both Solid State and Tube amps.
Been tinkering with electronics since I was 10 years old.
No formal education or training in electronics, just learn by reading and studying electronics books and manuals.
And also by doing of course.

I've built reverb and tremolo effects for amps that didn't have the effects built-in.
Had custom circuit boards made with Osh Park.
Modify guitar amp circuits to better suit my preferences, build and modify guitar effects pedals, etc...
Tinker and build one-off electronics gadgets not guitar related.

Oh yes, I do play guitar.
I'm rhythm guitar in our VERY amateur band, Los Vamanos.
Just a bunch of old fogeys wanting to have some fun and make some noise.
We are 7 members.
Lead guitar, 2 vocals, 1 male, 1 female (she's REALLY good, awesome voice), Bass guitar, Drums, Keyboards, and me rhythm guitar.
We do it for fun, for ourselves and play the occasional charity gig for free.
With this stupid virus thing we have not got together since March.
Really missing it.
Wanna go make some noise! :)

Cheers!

Sorry... Last one, I promise!
No more cluttering your thread with off-topic posts.
Thanks galaxiex for sharing that, I found that most interesting indeed. Although for terrain our landscape looks more like rickyracrer1983's landscape. One last questions, have you tried to design your own audio amplifiers?

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #207
Engine Part III

Thought I would update with a little more progress. I received round two of Diamond Pistons from the courier. They look correct, I even weighed them to double check. They are within a gram.


46140




46141



The offsets are on the correct size as well. Looks like I am good to go on installing these.


46142



Well it wasn't all smooth sailing as I thought. I had this overwhelming urge to check the ring gap the machinist was supposed to grind the gaps to according to the Total Seal chart I provided.


46143



Good grief, am I glad I checked. The top rails on the top gapless ring were not ground at all. Add to that the main upper and second were cut wide enough or consistent. I found 1, that's one second ring that had the proper gap. Most were 7 to 15 thousandths too small gap.

Crap, this could have ended badly under high load.

Here we go again, I've never ground rings myself so I did some research and looked at the grinders they had and thought, why buy another specific tool I'll rarely or never use again. So I had a brain drizzle and came up with this. All I needed to do was shave the ends parallel to one another. I've done enough hand machining on the fly I felt confident doing this.


46144



It's just the Dremel extension wand on low with the cut off disc clamped down to the X-Y table on the drill press with the direction rotating inwards on the ring. I used the lighting to judge the edge whilst grinding.

This worked surprisingly well.


46145



Just used the piston upside down and to the flare to set the distance of the ring in the bore when checking gaps. Once the gaps were set I assembled the rod, pin, locks and rings onto the piston and checked rod bearing clearances.

46146




46147



Clearances look good and consistent across the face.


46148



Finally the short block is going together. This shouldn't this frustrating. Next time I'll plan to do rings and cam bearings at home along with de-cruding the engine and I can't be disappointed when it's not done or done properly, plus I'll save loads of money as well.


46149



This is the second ring, it's a moly coated napier ring. After grinding the gaps I deburred the grind edge on the ring.

Continued in next post
 

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Discussion Starter #208
Engine Part III Continued


46150



To do the top rail on the gapless ring I had to think of someway to properly check as it's designed to compress inwards, unlike the rails on the oil control rings which are designed to expand outwards.

What I did was grind the main top ring first then flip it up-side-down in the bore with the proper feeler gauge inserted in its gap then putting the rail gap into the feeler gauge and laying down the rail atop the main ring flipped over. If it laid flat the gap was cut enough. If it didn't then I needed to grind a little more off. This was the only way I could think of measuring the top rail gap. Total Seal does say it's ok to take a little more off the rail than the gap on the main ring.


46151



Finally...

46152



I swear this shouldn't be this tedious. Took about 8 hours worth of time to grind the gaps, clean, check the rod bearings and finally install all 8 pistons.


46154



The crank rotates nice and smooth with all 8 pistons installed.

I didn't want to order any more parts until this was sorted out and everything was seemingly ok. With that I did order a Melling double roller timing chain, Melling HV oil pump and screen, Morel roller lifters and a complete Precision Oil Pumps roller adjustable rockers and assemblies including hardened rocker shafts. Also I ordered their cam bearing plate bolts and oil pump drive rod.

For the timing chain I was going to use the Cloyes true double roller I used on the LTD's 390 but that part is discontinued and when I looked at the reviews on the superseded part number many people said the timing marks on the cam sprocket are 180˚ out.

Well if a company can't be bothered to put the bloody timing marks on the right part, it makes me wonder what else they can't be bothered with to get right. With that I opted for the Melling timing set.

The reason I went with the Morel lifters is because Ford machining on the lifter bores was terrible plunge wise and the roller lifters from Competition Cams would actually lift the top land out of some of the lifter bores on high lift cams. The Morels have nice low top lands that alleviate this problem.

Now just waiting for those parts to arrive before I continue on.

Cheers
 

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I have assembled a number of FE engines (and other makes too) and also find it a somewhat tedious procedure.
Test fit, check and re-check etc, but have the satisfaction of doing it myself and I know it's done right.

Kudos for seeing it thru. (y)
 

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Thanks galaxiex for sharing that, I found that most interesting indeed. Although for terrain our landscape looks more like rickyracrer1983's landscape. One last questions, have you tried to design your own audio amplifiers?

Cheers
Thanks for your interest in my little hobby. :)

To answer your question, well... no, not really.... I have never designed an amp from scratch.
I basically take tried and proven circuits and "cut and paste" different circuits together to get what I want.

As an example, I have a very popular "modern day" tube amp, the Fender Blues Junior.
It is constructed with printed circuit boards, rather than the old hand wired circuit card construction that made Fender amps so bullet proof back in the day.
Indeed, vintage Fender amps are still very popular and I have seen even basket case amps restored to their former glory.
I also own 3 vintage Fender amps from the 70's, a Vibro Champ, a Princeton Reverb and a Deluxe Reverb.

Anyway... I took my little Blues Junior and gutted it of all pcb construction and completely "re-made" it to vintage style hand wired circuit card construction.
Along the way I modified the circuit to have tube driven reverb, the original reverb was solid state.

Here's a pic of what that looks like...

166328


Sorry I don't have a pic of what it looked like before, but here's a pic from the web of the stock BJ guts.

166329


You will notice mine has an extra tube, that is for the tube driven reverb.

MIne is now all hand wired with "vintage style" cloth covered wire with modern high temp insulation under the cloth.
I fabricated the circuit card with all the eyelets, and chassis mounted the pots, jacks and tube sockets.
Those items were mounted to the pcb in the stock amp.
If you look close you will see that I applied heatshrink tubing to the ends of each cloth wire so the cloth does not unravel.

The circuit itself is a mish-mash of vintage Fender AB763 preamp circuit (with some mods) and the Blues Junior power amp circuit.

I'm not sure how you are on reading schematics... but here's the schematic I came up with for this amp.


166330


Everything to the right of the master volume control is mostly stock Blues Junior.
Everything to the left of the master volume is Fender AB763 with some mods.

Of course there is a lot more to it than drawing a schematic and soldering a bunch of parts together.
The circuit card layout took me about a dozen iterations until I got it where I wanted it.
Then parts choice decisions etc...
Took me about 3 months working part time to get it all done.
But it sounds Fantastic!

Cheers!
 

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Discussion Starter #211
Thanks for your interest in my little hobby. :)

To answer your question, well... no, not really.... I have never designed an amp from scratch.
I basically take tried and proven circuits and "cut and paste" different circuits together to get what I want.

As an example, I have a very popular "modern day" tube amp, the Fender Blues Junior.
It is constructed with printed circuit boards, rather than the old hand wired circuit card construction that made Fender amps so bullet proof back in the day.
Indeed, vintage Fender amps are still very popular and I have seen even basket case amps restored to their former glory.
I also own 3 vintage Fender amps from the 70's, a Vibro Champ, a Princeton Reverb and a Deluxe Reverb.

Anyway... I took my little Blues Junior and gutted it of all pcb construction and completely "re-made" it to vintage style hand wired circuit card construction.
Along the way I modified the circuit to have tube driven reverb, the original reverb was solid state.

Here's a pic of what that looks like...

View attachment 166328

Sorry I don't have a pic of what it looked like before, but here's a pic from the web of the stock BJ guts.

View attachment 166329

You will notice mine has an extra tube, that is for the tube driven reverb.

MIne is now all hand wired with "vintage style" cloth covered wire with modern high temp insulation under the cloth.
I fabricated the circuit card with all the eyelets, and chassis mounted the pots, jacks and tube sockets.
Those items were mounted to the pcb in the stock amp.
If you look close you will see that I applied heatshrink tubing to the ends of each cloth wire so the cloth does not unravel.

The circuit itself is a mish-mash of vintage Fender AB763 preamp circuit (with some mods) and the Blues Junior power amp circuit.

I'm not sure how you are on reading schematics... but here's the schematic I came up with for this amp.


View attachment 166330

Everything to the right of the master volume control is mostly stock Blues Junior.
Everything to the left of the master volume is Fender AB763 with some mods.

Of course there is a lot more to it than drawing a schematic and soldering a bunch of parts together.
The circuit card layout took me about a dozen iterations until I got it where I wanted it.
Then parts choice decisions etc...
Took me about 3 months working part time to get it all done.
But it sounds Fantastic!

Cheers!
Hello galaxiex,

Sorry for the long delay in replying, I admit I forgot about this. The schematic is nicely done. Mind if I ask a few questions? Why was a 12AT7 used on the driver for the tank? Did the dynamic plate resistance match the matching transformer T3 for the tank?

Another question is do you feel tube/valve amps need a tube/valve rectifier vs solid state, say a 5Y3 for a low power amp or a 5U4 for a higher power one? I know it's personal preference really, just curious as to your thoughts. In looking at this you have a 3rd order low pass filter on the power supply effectively to feed the input stage. Although some small caps across the diodes in the bridge if discrete diodes are used would cut help cut down on noise from transients if using slow rectifier diodes like the 1N4007. Of course if Schottky diodes are used well then all is well :) Just thoughts...

Again well done indeed!

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #212
Hello All,

Been a while just wanted to update the progress on the engine. Finally parts started to come in.


46480



Since it's a roller cam you need the bronze cam plate and instead of those irritating Ford Phillips head screws I bought the low profile bolts for the plate.


46481


Easy peasy.


46482



New double roller timing chain set.


46483



Simplicity itself, just making sure I have the correct timing mark on the crank sprocket selected (0˚). Now to degree the camshaft and see if anything is amiss.


46484



Is this timing wheel absurdly large or what :). I had a long list of parts to order and this was on the list. I was so engrossed in the other parts I thought agh just buy the biggest wheel I could find for the best resolution. I saw the dimensions, but my central brain processing unit didn't give it much thought till it arrived. Crikey it's as big as the engine!

If anything it's easy to read. :geek:


46485



Verified TDC using a straight edge over the piston.


46486



The new Morel roller lifters to use for this test.


46487



The setup.


46488



This is the cam card for the camshaft. Now I found the opening degrees were spot on, but the closing degrees were within 1 degree. Not perfect, but doable. It is what it is. :rolleyes: With that out of way I can continue knowing everything is in order so far.

Continued in next post.
 

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Discussion Starter #213
Engine Assembly Continued


46489



The FE core plugs were next, I use the brass ones with a smidge of RTV wiped in the bore hole to help them seal.


46490




46491



This was an oops moment I forget to drill and install the oil gallery plug above the cam sprocket. So I drilled this with an 0.028" drill bit to get a light puff squirt of oil on the timing chain.


46492



I think this is the only time I use the little cheesy Dremel Drill press.


46493



There we go. Now time for paint on the short block.


46494




46495



Just tedious work.


46496




46497



After the block was painted I did the same to the timing cover.

Continued in next post.
 

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Discussion Starter #214
Engine Assembly Continued


46499



The new engine mounts, I stripped the coating on them and used epoxy paint.


46500




46501



Getting somewhere now.


46502




46503



The new oil pump, pickup and drive rod. Obviously it's a high volume oil pump.


46504



I spent some time adjust the push on retainer on the oil pump drive rod so there was some play but not enough to come out of the oil pump and not so tight the push on retainer rubs on the block and creates metal.

Then I opened the oil pump to check the internals and put some assembly lube in there. It was really dry.


46505



The timing cover and parts. The new seal is installed in the cover.


46506



Not less forgetting the seal splash shield first.


46507



Of course you use the snout spacer to locate the timing cover so it's centre'd on the seal. In this case the timing cover sits proud of the bottom of the block. But that's just the way it has to be.


46508



These oil pan studs work really well I liked them on the LTD's 390. So I used them here.

Continued in next post.
 

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Discussion Starter #215
Engine Assembly Continued


46509



I used Locktite to secure the oil pan studs into the block and timing cover.


46510



I reused the old harmonic balancer, just stripped and painted it. The isolated rubber pad was in really good shape and serviceable.


46511



Timing pointer and hardware. I tapped the cover for 10-32.


46512




46513



Even though I am using the 3 groove accessory pulley over this (power steering and air con) I did do a sanity check and verified TDC on the piston and it matched with 0 on the harmonic balancer. It's a good feeling when things line up when they are supposed to.


46514



This is a new Airtex coolant pump.


46515




46516



And of course the super cobra jet oil filter adapter cleaned and painted to match.


46517



Now it's starting to look like something. This is where the progress stops for now.


46518



The oil pan, it's woefully inadequate on keeping oil on the pickup if a hard launch should happen. So this will have to be stripped and that baffle removed. Then increase the pan capacity by a quart or so, install a new improved baffle and add a Ford low level oil switch and an oil temperature sender.

This will require some work.

I did order the multiport fuel injection parts. As it was recommended to port match the heads to the intake I am not installing the heads till the intake arrives. The intake I am using is the Edelbrock multiport Victor intake and Edelbrock is out of them. I ordered everything through Summit and Summit was nice enough to check on when it would be available and it wouldn't be till mid to late November.

I kept that option in my back pocket and called around, turns out FAST has two of these intakes in stock under their part number so the wonderful customer service at Summit went out of their way to order the intake from FAST and then sell it to me much cheaper than what FAST was selling it for. 65 dollars cheaper to be exact.

I tip my hat to Summit for allowing me to order everything through them and the discount. The Holley throttle body arrived, the Holley Bosch style 42lb injectors arrived, the connector kits arrived, just waiting on the intake and fuel rails to arrive.

Until next time.

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #217
If I may add one thing. Do a degree wheel check on your damper marks. No question later on.
Hello rickyracer1983,

That's a good idea, however I will do that on the accessory pulley that installs over the damper and its single grove pulley. The accessory pulley completely obscures the timing marks on the damper and has its own timing marks. I was just commenting that even the damper lines up properly.

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #218
Hello,

A little more progress on this car. More engine fun. Well not really, it's porting and polishing time and this is also a miserable experience, but it really needs to be done to realize the full benefit of all the goodies installed.


46590



Now on the Edelbrock head the intake ports surprisingly match the gaskets. I am shocked. Usually Edelbrock products have problems. As a reminder these "ready to run out of the box" heads had loads of metal shavings on these. You would be a complete ignoramus to just bolt these on "out of the box".

But the intake port is very rough and could use a little smoothing to help keep the fuel from condensing on the rough gritty bits.


46591



So I smoothed out the runner and bowl area and blended it a bit better.

46592



Here's a before picture.


46593



This is more of what I expect from Edelbrock. Yup. Going to need to really remove and blend this. <sigh>


46594



I spent about 4 hours on this one head. It's much smoother on the exhaust and intake ports.


46595




46596



Is it really worth it? At best it's probably worth a few ponies mid to upper RPM range. The sheer amount of mess made with aluminum shavings is mind boggling.


46597



These are FPA headers and they are nicely built and use the full area of the gasket. These are ~1200 dollars and in my opinion worth every penny.


46598



The head was cleaned reassembled and painted. All the goodies ready for install.

Continued in next post.
 

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Discussion Starter #219
Engine Assembly Continued

This is the part I like. Putting it together and seeing the results.



46599



The head studs get screwed in hand tight and the deck and head surface were wiped with IPA one last time before the head gasket went on. Not less forgetting the locating inserts, were well, inserted.



46600



I followed Edelbrocks torque specs on the bolts instead of ARP. ARP instructs to use 110 ft/lbs on all bolts, but Edelbrock says 110 on the top row and 100 on the bottom row in 3 equal increments. Slowly looking more and more like an engine.


46601




46602



Now for the more funner (funner isn't a word but it should be) part.


46603



The multiport manifold arrived.


46604



This is one serious chunk of aluminum. It weighs just about the same as the all cast iron LS5 intake on my 454.


46605




46606



So here's what I've chosen for parts. It's obviously the Edelbrock intake and Edelbrock fuel rails and believe me I'll get back to those in a bit. The throttle body is a Holley generic multiport throttle body. The injectors are Holley made based on the lapped disc Bosch style injectors. These are 42 lb @ 43 PSI fuel pressure.

When I picked these out I used a BSFC of 0.5 and 500 peak horsepower, then rounded up to the nearest size injector. I chose Holley injectors because they supply the voltage compensation chart for fuel delivery. This is crucial when manually programming your own system. The rest of the system is more or less standard EFI parts. I'll need to mount a MAP sensor as there is no provision on the throttle body but that's already sorted out.


46607




46608



Now back to railing on Edelbrock quality. On the right is a Blue Thunder intake and that was 750 dollars. The Edelbrock is 815 dollars. The Blue Thunder is fully machined nicely and ready for install. The Edelbrock intake is not. I don't have specific pictures yet, but I need to machine a flat spot around each intake mounting bolt so it can actually seal. Plus the intake ports are so small and off compared to the intake gaskets much porting and polishing will be needed to match the heads.

But it doesn't end there. So the Edelbrock fuel rails I ordered had shown a different style of rail. Now these in my opinion are much nicer looking, but Edelbrock put the hardware for the old style of which is completely useless and I'll have to machine standoffs out of round stock and order some stainless hardware.

Just typical Edelbrock shenanigans.

Until next time.

Cheers
 
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