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Discussion Starter #61
Hello galaxiex,

Yuppers they are a handsome looking car indeed. Might you by chance have any interior and engine bay pictures to share as well? I would love to see them.

My better half actually sparked my interest in the '66's. I've always liked the '68 fastback style (was my very first car), but we were at local car meet up and there was a '66 galaxie 500 7 Litre fastback and she loved the lines of it. We bought some abandoned old '66 2 door hardtops to experiment with and they sort of grew on me. However the clincher for me was when I saw the '66 LTD 4 door hardtop, I just had to have it. Just a beautiful stately looking car with a contrasting vinyl top. I'm not even a fan of 4 doors and I think the '66 LTD looks a tad nicer than the 2 door hardtop.

What's interesting is the evolution of interior style. The '66 is nothing more than a very mildly face lifted '65. I have a theory Ford blew their budget on the complete ground up redesign for the '65 and did the bare minimum for '66. The interior of the '67 really deviated from the '65/'66. Then in '68 it's like Ford reeled the dash layout back in a bit as it more resembles the '65/'66 models.

I do admit I love the '66 body style over the '65. They nailed the lines on the '66. However I do like the door cards better on the '65 over the '66.

Anyway, nuff of that. Thank you for sharing the pictures.

Cheers
 

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Desert, have you considered teaching? you would be a natural. the ability to make the physics understandable on a level most can understand is seldom seen. a local jc would give you a chance to change many lives
 

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Hi DesertXL,

Thanks for the interest in my Galaxie. :)
I enjoy your thoughts on the styling and evolution, and thanks for that too.

I have some pics I could post but rather than clutter up your thread, here's a link to some...

Looong term project frame off 1966 Galaxie 500XL

I have not updated that thread for quite some time... and I just realized I don't have any engine compartment pics.

I agree, I like the 66 style over the 65, subtle as it is.

Side note I have owned a couple of these mid 60's full size Ford's that I used as beaters.
65 4dr 500 with 352, and a 67 4dr Custom (they didn't even call it a Galaxie) 289 auto and manual everything else.
I got several years out of both before they succumbed to rust... :(

My introduction to full size Fords came when I was 16 and a high school friend had almost unlimited use of his dads 68 LTD 4dr hardtop.
Nice car that was! Fully loaded 390 AC PW etc. Loved the Hide-Away headlights.
Another close friend had a 66 LTD 2dr HT.

I do like the 4dr HardTop's, there is just something about them... and that cool vent under the back window for the "Flow Thru" ventilation. :cool:
I once saw a 67 LTD 4dr HardTop in a local pick-n-pull wrecking yard.
I was sad that I could not save it, but I did score the factory steel disc brake wheels from it.
No use for them myself but I knew they were unique to those cars, so I "saved" them. ;)

I could blather on and on... but I'll leave it at that for now.

Maybe later this week or weekend, I'll update my thread linked above, with more pics, and what I've been doing lately.

Cheers!
Dale
 

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Discussion Starter #64
Desert, have you considered teaching? you would be a natural. the ability to make the physics understandable on a level most can understand is seldom seen. a local jc would give you a chance to change many lives
Hello extech,

Thank you for the kind compliment. I don't know that I would make a good teacher or even if I have the qualification in this arena, the mechanical stuff is just a hobby. My degree and most of my work experience has been in electrical engineering. I feel more qualified to try and teach that if anything. :)

I guess in a way if I can share my trials and tribulations through these forums and spark someone else's interest in trying or at least getting their hands dirty so to speak that would make me happy.

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #65
Hi DesertXL,

Thanks for the interest in my Galaxie. :)
I enjoy your thoughts on the styling and evolution, and thanks for that too.

I have some pics I could post but rather than clutter up your thread, here's a link to some...

Looong term project frame off 1966 Galaxie 500XL

I have not updated that thread for quite some time... and I just realized I don't have any engine compartment pics.

I agree, I like the 66 style over the 65, subtle as it is.

Side note I have owned a couple of these mid 60's full size Ford's that I used as beaters.
65 4dr 500 with 352, and a 67 4dr Custom (they didn't even call it a Galaxie) 289 auto and manual everything else.
I got several years out of both before they succumbed to rust... :(

My introduction to full size Fords came when I was 16 and a high school friend had almost unlimited use of his dads 68 LTD 4dr hardtop.
Nice car that was! Fully loaded 390 AC PW etc. Loved the Hide-Away headlights.
Another close friend had a 66 LTD 2dr HT.

I do like the 4dr HardTop's, there is just something about them... and that cool vent under the back window for the "Flow Thru" ventilation. :cool:
I once saw a 67 LTD 4dr HardTop in a local pick-n-pull wrecking yard.
I was sad that I could not save it, but I did score the factory steel disc brake wheels from it.
No use for them myself but I knew they were unique to those cars, so I "saved" them. ;)

I could blather on and on... but I'll leave it at that for now.

Maybe later this week or weekend, I'll update my thread linked above, with more pics, and what I've been doing lately.

Cheers!
Dale
Hi galaxiex,

Oooooooooooh my gosh I do remember this thread now. I had saved pictures off it for reference and inspiration when I first delved into the old Ford arena. Would you mind terribly if I asked how you formed the upper patch panels for the wheel arches? Sheet metal work is not my forte. I've been studying this thread 1966 Ford Galaxie 7-Litre resto thread to glean some more insight into how they massaged those cheap crappy Sherman quarters into proper shape ( I have those very same crappy quarters). I wish they would have elaborated more on that particular aspect. This is my next big hurdle I can forsee coming up sooner rather than later.

On a side subject, does that "Flow Thru" ventilation really work well? Ford only kept it on the '65-'66 full size 4 door hardtops and then discontinued it for the full size. I was curious as to why it was discontinued as it seems an inexpensive alternative to proper factory air conditioning which was one of thee most expensive options back then. I think the second most expensive option was an AM-FM radio. Funny how that became standard equipment after a while.

I know on my 1973 Caprice Classic convertible I've seemingly have owned forever, air conditioning was a 482 dollar option, whilst the 454 big block option was only 150 dollars. I was glad someone all those years ago ticked both those boxes and a few more when they ordered it new.

Cheers
 

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Hi DesertXL,

Ya, those crappy Sherman panels....
As you can see from the pics in that old thread, I just "patched in" the rusted spots.
Very tedious work to carefully cut only as much as needed, and then cut and reshape the small pieces of the Sherman panels to fit the cut out.
Reshaping the small pieces was done quite crudely... a bench vise, pliers, body hammers and various dollys as I recall...
I'd beat, bend, hammer and then continually test compare the piece to the actual panel to at least "get it close" to the right shape.
Sorry, not much help. Just trial and error.
The patched in pieces were butt welded in place to avoid overlapping.

I basically "learned how to weld" as I was doing this!
There was quite a bit of trial and error as I had never done sheet metal repair before this, although I did practice on some scrap sheet metal before starting on the quarters.
Where I could, I left "bits and pieces" of the non-rusted parts of the original panel, so the original shape and contour would not be lost.
The end result is not perfect by any stretch... but I think quite serviceable, and will of course need some filler work.
I simply could not afford to pay someone to do the bodywork, so my amateur results will have to do.
I originally considered using the full panels, but they are just not shaped correctly, as you obviously know.

I wish I had the skills, space and equipment to reshape the full panels in the manner shown in the thread you linked.
That is awesome work he did on that Galaxie!

Side note:
I searched long and hard to find some NOS original quarter panels, and I eventually tracked down a passenger side panel.
I forget what state it was located in, but the seller would not ship it to Canada. Probably long gone now.

I remember (I could be wrong about this) a story that these cars, specifically the 66 Galaxies, were produced in Brazil up until 1986. 20 more years of 66 Galaxies!!!
Apparently the tooling dies were shipped there and they continued to produce these cars!
Probably they were all 4 dr sedans to be used as Taxi's and basic transportation, but I had hopes that there were some 2dr H/T's as well.
If true, the dies have probably long since been melted down, but maybe Brazil has some restore-able Galaxie's!

On the Flow Thru ventilation, I don't know how effectively it works on the Fords, but many years ago I helped a single mom buy a car.
What I found for her was a 67 Plymouth Fury III 4dr hard top and it had the vent under the back window. Cool car. 318 "big block" and a 727 TorqueFlite auto.
In the time she owned it I ended up rebuilding the trans and later the engine. Unfortunately it eventually succumbed to the rust demon as well.
As I recall the vent worked quite well, especially in wet rainy conditions to keep the windows clear. I think it probably worked good on the Fords too.
On the Plymouth the vent was vacuum operated. I think the Ford was as well?

I am mainly a Ford enthusiast, but I appreciate all makes.
I like the Caprice and Impala's from the era.
Another beater I had was a 68 Impala with a 307 2bbl and PowerGlide.
I really liked that car but alas.... rust got the better of it too.

Your Caprice convert sounds like a keeper!

Cheers!

Edit; Ha! memory about the Brazilian Fords not too bad tho I had the dates wrong...
Front sheet metal is different, but the cars are based on the 66 Galaxie!

Ford Galaxie - Wikipedia
 

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gee . when i did that search the first thing to come up was"there's no such thing as a big block 318"
 

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Yes, context is everything.

Quote from Google search....

"At first,there is no "big block 318". (correct name is either 318-A Poly, or 318-A Wide-block) used up to 1966. Folks just started to call the old 318 " bigblock" when the new light version,( 318 LA ) came in 1967. Another way to tell the difference between them is how the valve-covers is bolted."

So ya... it's not technically a "big block" but it came to be called as such. It is very wide for a 318.
If you saw one in person you would think it's a "big block" judging by appearance.

You will also note that it says the 318-A Poly ended in 66 and the new 318-LA came in 67.... so how could my friends 67 Fury have a "big block" 318-A???

If you do some research, you will find that the Canadian built Plymouths (and probably Dodges too)
carried over the Poly "big block" 318-A for the 67 model year.

BTW the "Poly" means Poly Spherical combustion chamber, as opposed to the "wedge" combustion chamber on the 318 LA engine.

Another quote from a Google search...

"Most likely a Polysphere 318. I have heard them called Y Blocks , Wide Blocks,Big Block 318, and Canadian 318"

It's a dated design compared to "modern" engines... but a darn good one. Much like our much loved FE block, but far less popular.
Many were used in industrial applications such as irrigation pumps and the like.
 

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Hi galaxiex,

Oooooooooooh my gosh I do remember this thread now. I had saved pictures off it for reference and inspiration when I first delved into the old Ford arena. Would you mind terribly if I asked how you formed the upper patch panels for the wheel arches? Sheet metal work is not my forte. I've been studying this thread 1966 Ford Galaxie 7-Litre resto thread to glean some more insight into how they massaged those cheap crappy Sherman quarters into proper shape ( I have those very same crappy quarters). I wish they would have elaborated more on that particular aspect. This is my next big hurdle I can forsee coming up sooner rather than later.

On a side subject, does that "Flow Thru" ventilation really work well? Ford only kept it on the '65-'66 full size 4 door hardtops and then discontinued it for the full size. I was curious as to why it was discontinued as it seems an inexpensive alternative to proper factory air conditioning which was one of thee most expensive options back then. I think the second most expensive option was an AM-FM radio. Funny how that became standard equipment after a while.

I know on my 1973 Caprice Classic convertible I've seemingly have owned forever, air conditioning was a 482 dollar option, whilst the 454 big block option was only 150 dollars. I was glad someone all those years ago ticked both those boxes and a few more when they ordered it new.

Cheers
DesertXL- here is my experience with Flow Thru, or "Silent Flo", as it is called in the 1966 Owners Manual. I actually was very interested in making this mysterious system work when I bought my 66 LTD 4 door. I figured out pretty easily that it operated through engine vaccum, coming to a pull toggle switch inside the cabin, near the vent pull switch on the drivers side- as you all ready know.

I was able to determine that my pressure switch in the car was operational and getting vaccum, yet I know the Blender doors, as the call the air flow doors under the rear deck panel, were not opening. One rubber line goes from the engine, drawing vaccum, then through the firewall to the toggle switch inside the car. You pull the pressure switch, it activates vaccum, which in theory, when the system works, then used the pressure valves on the blender doors to open the rear vents, located under the tray inside the car under the back window.

So, I did what any of us would do, I took off the door sill plates on both the rear and front doors on the passenger side and kick panel on the passenger side and traced where those old brittle rubber hoses were going.

I found they route under the dash, from the pull toggle pressure switch on the drivers side, under the dash, to the passenger side, then behind the kick panel on the pass side and then under the front and rear door sill plates back under the rear seat floor area, then route up to the blender doors! Quite a route!

Now, this is a single rubber line, which over 50 some years and mice damage later, had holes chewed through it. So, diagnosis is simple there, holes in line, no vaccum being passed.

I bought some windshield wiper hose, very small, perfect size, at my local NAPA and then replaced the lines.

There is a T splitter in the back, where vaccum is fed to the drivers side blender door unit in the back, so literally one small rubber line carries all the vacuum from the engine to the rear of the car to actuate the blender doors on both sides.

Once I got all the lines secure, magically, with the engine running and vacuum being present, the switch and doors opened and closed perfectly!

Now, to their effectiveness. Ah, so so. I can say I have really only noticed their effect when all the other windows were closed and I had the drivers side vent window open only while driving. Only then could I feel the pull of the air through the cabin.

It most def will NOT replace AC, in no way at all. But, with the 4 door 66 LTD, with no pillar, I just love opening all 4 windows anyway, that is my poor mans AC.

But, I have an operational system. I sometimes just open the blender doors to hear them working, just that alone gives me a thrill, haha. BTW- very quiet they are, but they have a distinct sound.

Here is a pic of how it is supposed to work from the 66 Owners manual.

And, if anyone is at all interested, here is a link to my flickr page, where I have a video from 2018 that shows the blender doors in operations as I fixed them.

https://flic.kr/p/29jDHif
164565
 

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BTW- with the "Silent Flo"- I was lucky, the "Tub" that is what catches all the leaves and debris from outside the car through the vent opening outside, that tub usually is full of debris and rots out. There are hoses that usually are dry rotted or clogged, so that tub ends up filling with debis and water and then you have a major leak inside the car. Not so on mine, lucky,found plenty of dried leaves and acorns, which I cleaned out and luckily my drain hoses for the tub were good. They dont repro those, so I have seen some pretty inventive solutions to replace them, some good, some real bad(a guy duct taped a funnel under the tub and routed the water out of the car , haha. Thank God mine were good. I make sure to let as little debris fall in the rear outside vent as possible, as it is easier to maintain that way.
 

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Discussion Starter #73
BTW- with the "Silent Flo"- I was lucky, the "Tub" that is what catches all the leaves and debris from outside the car through the vent opening outside, that tub usually is full of debris and rots out. There are hoses that usually are dry rotted or clogged, so that tub ends up filling with debis and water and then you have a major leak inside the car. Not so on mine, lucky,found plenty of dried leaves and acorns, which I cleaned out and luckily my drain hoses for the tub were good. They dont repro those, so I have seen some pretty inventive solutions to replace them, some good, some real bad(a guy duct taped a funnel under the tub and routed the water out of the car , haha. Thank God mine were good. I make sure to let as little debris fall in the rear outside vent as possible, as it is easier to maintain that way.
Hello jdstefan66,

Thank you very kindly for responding with all that information. I was especially curious as to the performance of the vent system as a whole. I've never yet driven the LTD properly so I'm curious. I was fortunate enough that someone ordered factory air in our '66 LTD but I still think it's a neat feature and something you just don't see on full size Fords.

As for the rear drain hoses, yuppers, a royal bugger as no one reproduces those and mine were dry rotted. This is the solution I came up with. But first my old hoses.

164567


The base where it bolts to the floor is, was, disintegrating.

The part that makes a solution hard is the tight mounting area to the floor behind the rear seat and the large pipe opening at the upper gutter in the rear cowl.

164568


I modeled a piece that would bolt and seal to the floor that had the same circumference as the oblong nipple on the upper gutter but would clear the obstructions in the rear floor area.

164569


I set this is up in the CAM software to be 3D printed with ABS plastic.

164570


One side.

164571


and the mirrored other side.

164572


Originally this was my kit. The hose was a thin wall rubber impregnated fiberglass hose. But later I thought that was a bit sketchy and found a better solution with premoulded silicon hose. The ABS pieces were given an acetone brushing to seal the surfaces inside and out.

164573


Yuppers overkill but should outlive me by far! Even stainless hose clamps were used.

164574


164575


One less thing I'll have to worry about and should drain most debris straight through without clogging up.

I've been wanting to return to finishing this car (was burnt out for a while and took a few months off it). I'll have to start a new thread on it here as my old pictures are blurred from using Photobucket.

Cheers!
 

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Discussion Starter #74
Rear Disc Brakes Continued
It took a while to find some of the correctly fitting parts but some more progress has been made.

XLRearDisc_01.jpg

New rotors.

XLRearDisc_02.jpg

Powder coated the calipers and the rest of the misc parts.

XLRearDisc_03.jpg

Assembled.

XLRearDisc_04.jpg

One problem I noted. For some odd reason the Panther backing plates have a longer pad guide plate than the Explorer backing plate. So I had to procure the Explorer hardware kit for those. Live and learn.....

XLRearDisc_05.jpg

Why Ford would make two different backing plates with such a small odd difference I'll never know.

XLRearDisc_06.jpg

This looks better.

XLRearDisc_08.jpg

XLRearDisc_07.jpg

A small note, I wasn't trying to be some pretentious wanker in buying "Brembo" pads. :rolleyes:
:p
It's just Rock Auto had a clearance on them, I think they were 12 bucks, it was a good deal. :)

XLRearDisc_09.jpg

OK, now to tackle hydraulic caliper hoses.

XLRearDisc_10.jpg


I had poured through Rock Auto's hydraulic hoses for different makes, years and models and bought some OEM hoses that I thought had a chance of working.

Well they didn't.
:(


As much as I try to not turn my cars into a rolling Summit advertisement I had to turn to the aftermarket for these <cringe>.

I wanted DOT certified hoses and Summit said these were DOT street legal hoses and I paid approximately twice the price for that. But we'll get into that in the next post.
 

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Discussion Starter #75
Rear Disc Brakes Continued
These Russel hoses are supposed to be DOT legal. Well they are not and I'm a little miffed about paying for something that isn't.

XLRearDisc_11.jpg


XLRearDisc_12.jpg

Simply putting the letters DOT, does not meet the legal requirements.

XLRearDisc_14.jpg

Even says street legal on the box.

It took me less than 2 minutes to find the statute online and I'm sure a 9 year old can clearly follow it.

DOT1.png



This is referencing FMVSS No. 106.


DOT2.png

It's not that I'm trying to be difficult, it's just that if you're product says it's something and really isn't, that's not fair to the consumer.

You can clearly see that you need to have the registered name, the letters DOT, printed lines but most importantly the date of manufacture, the inside diameter of the hose, and whether or not it's low expansion or regular expansion material. The date is the most important because hoses age and you need to know at a glance if the hose is simply too old to use. There is an SAE spec that states rubber hoses have a useful life of 10 years from the date of manufacture.

XLRearDisc_15.jpg

I am assuming this is the date of manufacture inside the box, fat lot of good it does on the box and not the hose.

XLRearDisc_13.jpg

These are the hoses I bought for the '68 model year aftermarket. You can see they are compliant.

All I can say is Russel get your act together, there's no excuse for this! This is typical bone idled laziness on the companies part.

Another reason I am concerned about this is if they can't get a simple printing detail right what about the quality of the rest of the hose. After the body is joined to the chassis for good, I plan on testing these brakes, even if the engine isn't ready to run yet I can attach the vacuum pump to the booster and mash the brake pedal to the floor. If these hoses pop or leak then it's plan B.

Plan B would be buying the simple steel adapter from 10 mm banjo to AN-3 and simply making my own brake hoses from Aeroquip 303-3 hose and 491-3 fittings (done this before). These are certified aircraft parts. Yes they won't be DOT approved, but they are approved for certified aircraft. In my book if they are legal on Boeing, Airbus and even a crappy Cessna then they are more than good enough for an automobile.
:)


The reason why I am railing on this is the personal responsibility we have when we modify or even do maintenance to a car. Taking short cuts can have really bad consequences and we are liable for what we do to our cars if they should injure and or cause property damage to others. It's important to be diligent in our work. Ignorance is no excuse.

OK rant over :whistle:
:rolleyes:

moving on...

XLRearDisc_16.jpg


Next up is the adapter I'll need to go from 3-AN to 3/8-24 inverted flare. I found a couple of these and bought them. They have different clip heights for different thicknesses of bracket they'll be mounted in. I plan on using some left over 4130 steel from previous projects and it's 1/8" thick. The bottom fitting may work the best.

XLRearDisc_17.jpg

The plan is to route the brake hose like so.

XLRearDisc_18.jpg


I can make the bracket to thread into the lower control arm welded bracket on the axle housing and it can hold the adapter fitting right about here. Once that is made I can make the stainless brake lines and complete the plumbing on the rear axle.

More to come.

Cheers
 

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Hi DesertXL ,

The level of detail and your great narrative on the why's and wherefore's of this build is nothing short of awesome!
It's great to get to see this level of workmanship and detail in a build.
Those "professional" TV car show builders have nuthin on you!
Of course they are restricted by the half or one hour format, but jeeez, this is great!

Anyway, I posted because I know of a place that make DOT compliant stainless brake hoses for almost any vintage car or truck.... ever...
Big claim, but check out his store here...

BRAKE HOSES UNLIMITED | eBay Stores

Perhaps you already know of him, but good to let others know too. :)
He will also make custom hoses with whatever ends you need, click on the FAQ at the top of the page.

I bought the hoses for my 66 from him and can attest to the quality.

Cheers!
 

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Discussion Starter #77
Hi DesertXL ,

The level of detail and your great narrative on the why's and wherefore's of this build is nothing short of awesome!
It's great to get to see this level of workmanship and detail in a build.
Those "professional" TV car show builders have nuthin on you!
Of course they are restricted by the half or one hour format, but jeeez, this is great!

Anyway, I posted because I know of a place that make DOT compliant stainless brake hoses for almost any vintage car or truck.... ever...
Big claim, but check out his store here...

BRAKE HOSES UNLIMITED | eBay Stores

Perhaps you already know of him, but good to let others know too. :)
He will also make custom hoses with whatever ends you need, click on the FAQ at the top of the page.

I bought the hoses for my 66 from him and can attest to the quality.

Cheers!
Hello galaxiex,

Thank you for the link, actually that's where the 3 line set I bought for this chassis (actually for a '68 with factory disc brakes) came from. They were the only ones selling those hoses that I could find.

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #78
Rear Disc Brakes Continued
I thought I would do something a little different in presentation. I thought maybe someone would want to see how I make a bracket from conception to finish. I realize I jump a lot of steps and you only see a small fraction of the pictures that are taken. So for the rear hose brackets I will show the entire process how I came up with them for anyone new to this who is wondering how you do this at home.

So from a couple posts up you can see I need some sort of bracket to hold the flexible brake hose above and secure an adapter to the bracket so I can attach a solid line to the other side.

I am not very good at conceptualizing detailed imagery in my minds eye. Darn thing is practically blind. So I start off with simple card paper, tape, scissors, and a pen/marker.

XLbrakes_01.jpg

I start off with simple orthogonal shapes; squares and rectangles. If I need more I use tape, if I need less it's scissors time.

XLbrakes_02.jpg


I continue till I have something I like. Now when I trim I'm not cutting to have straight lines, close enough will do on something like this because I have some wiggle room around the bracket.

XLbrakes_03.jpg

So my first template is crude but critical dimensions are accurate.

XLbrakes_04.jpg

Now I can go to the table and true up the sides (make them parallel and perpendicular) on another template.

XLbrakes_05.jpg

Next I added the bolt holes.

XLbrakes_06.jpg

and I checked to see if the original circle I cut out would be big enough to hold the clip. It wasn't. So the template under it has a bigger circle.

XLbrakes_07.jpg


That'll work.

XLbrakes_08.jpg

You certainly do not need any special stencils for something like this.

XLbrakes_09.jpg


Next I picked out the hardware I'm going to use and made sure the holes were adequately spaced.

XLbrakes_10.jpg

Rounded corners look better so grabbed a socket and applied a radius to them. This was unintentional, but I did start to giggle as it ended up looking a bit phallic. :whistle:
:oops:


continued in next post.
 

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Discussion Starter #79
Rear Disc Brakes Continued

XLbrakes_11.jpg

Traced it out on a piece of leftover 4130 Chromoly.

XLbrakes_12.jpg

Roughly cut it out on my cheesy bandsaw. It's a really old Harbor Freight special. It was made in Taiwan and not China. Maybe that's why it still works. :unsure:
:p


XLbrakes_13.jpg


I used a bastard file to smooth out all the edges. Now you can use some other means, however, since this is Chromoly, if you use a tool that will create fine enough particles to get airborne you need a respirator as this contains chromium. You need to be cognizant of the materials you are working with and the dangers associated with them.

XLbrakes_14.jpg


100 calories later.

XLbrakes_15.jpg

Centre punch for the holes.

XLbrakes_16.jpg

Now I realize this may seem straight forward, but I thought I'd share with you how I handle drill bits and drilling. How many times have you went for a drill bit and it was dull? Probably too many to count. Here's my system for evaluation. I buy 1/8" jobber drill bits in decent quantities (from McMaster). Every hole larger than 1/8" I use the 1/8" drill bit to start each hole. As they wear I toss them for a new one as they are relatively cheap. You would not believe how much it saves on the other drill bits in your set. I also buy other drill bits in 1/4, 5/16, 3/8, 1/2" for the same reason.

XLbrakes_17.jpg


Another tip these cheap drill bits from Harbor Freight work really well. Surprisingly.

XLbrakes_18.jpg


XLbrakes_19.jpg

Now I did oversize the holes by 1/32" to allow for powder coating.

XLbrakes_20.jpg

Since I need mirrored brackets all I need to do is bend the tab the other way.

continued in next post.
 

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Discussion Starter #80
Rear Disc Brakes Continued
XLbrakes_21.jpg


To do a simple fold, I use two whopping pieces of angle iron.

XLbrakes_22.jpg


It just has two bolts that hold them more or less in place, but the bolts are loose.

Since this is 3/4 hard (tempered) Chromoly, in no way are you going to easily bend that by using a hammer. You'd probably break the vise. So it must be heated to bend easier.

XLbrakes_23.jpg


This is a small oxy-acetylene kit you can buy at chain stores. I don't use it much at all, except for times like this. All I can say is if you are unfamiliar with using these gases you MUST read the handling and setup instructions. Unless you want your last fleeting thought to be, so that's what the red arc on the acetylene gauge means. :eek:
:eek:


XLbrakes_24.jpg

Heat it orange hot with a neutral flame and hammer down. You want to be sure it's a 90˚ bend before you put out the torch as even this method which alters the temper on the Chromoly still produces one tough bend you won't be able to alter once it starts cooling down.

XLbrakes_25.jpg


It's twins, well, sort of.

XLbrakes_26.jpg

Next up is drilling the holes in the axle bracket to mount these brackets to test fit.

XLbrakes_27.jpg

Because the upper hole is really close to the axle tube a taper tap will not be able to make it all the way through. But you can start it with the taper tap and then switch to the plug tap (squared off one) and finish cutting the threads.

XLbrakes_28.jpg

You can better see.

Next up powder coating at home.

Continued in next thread.
 
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