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Discussion Starter #81
Powder Coating at Home (Rear Disc Brake Brackets)

I thought I'd share some of the things I learned about powder coating at home. It was a huge learning curve for me in just about every aspect of it.

Here's some of my ultra cheesy tools I use.

XLbrakes_29.jpg

This is a regular old electric stove. We found this for 50 bucks locally on Craigslist.
I removed the top elements and controls. The stove is a self cleaning stove so it's really well insulated which translates to doesn't waste much energy in loosing heat. I built a stand for it on wheels so I can clean behind it easily.

XLbrakes_30.jpg

A redeeming feature of this stove is the little vent pipe under the rear element. Since powder coating produces toxic gases you need to suck the fumes out of the work space.

XLbrakes_31.jpg

Yuppers, flex exhaust pipe acting as a radiator to dissipate the heat before it turns to a polymer shop vac hose.

This might be one thing leads to another but....

XLbrakes_32.jpg

That suction line comes from this blast cabinet. Since I have limited space, this made sense to pull the fumes through this blast cabinet then to the blower.

XLbrakes_34.jpg

The blower pulls enough vacuum to run both blast cabinets and the little tiny paint/powder both, which is obviously a cheap tote turned on its side.

XLbrakes_35.jpg

The gate valves on the suction side are set and never adjusted. The super cheesy paint tote allows me to put it off to the side and use the vent tube over the degreaser tank to suck out those fumes.

XLbrakes_36.jpg

The suction motor assembly is from an old wood dust collector I bought at Menards eons ago. It's mounted to a steel plate which is mounted to the angle iron uprights via old body mounts so no vibration is transmitted into the metal buildings frame and is not loud at all. It jets out through the roof with a 180˚ down spout up top to prevent rain and snow blowing in.

It's simple, works really well and cheap.

Onto the super cheesy powder coat/paint tote.

XLbrakes_37.jpg

On the top of the tote there is a hole with a bent hook that allows me to twirl the part being powder coated or painted. Also for powder coating the negative lead attaches to this and ultimately the part.

XLbrakes_38.jpg

There's the hook to hang and twirl the part.

Again stupid simple, easy to make, works unbelievably well and cheap.

For the powder I use this.

XLbrakes_33.jpg

It's UV resistant and works really well. It's about 15 bucks a pound. The powder Harbor Freight uses is not UV resistant and is flammable. I DO NOT recommend using that cheap stuff. Been there done that...

Continued in next post.
 

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Discussion Starter #82
Powder Coating Continued (Disc Brake Brackets)
One last thought about using a blower to suck out fumes. What air goes out of a room needs to be allowed back in at some point. For this small blower, the seals around my bay door are horrible and allow the fresh air back in. But if I didn't have that I'd need an air intake off the roof to allow make up air back into the building. Otherwise if you have some gas fired appliance you risk reversing the draft on the flew and sucking in carbon monoxide/dioxide into your work area.

One thing seemingly leads to another.

XLbrakes_39.jpg

I use the cheap Harbor Freight powder coat apparatus. Let me just say this right off the bat. It's terrible. :poop:

Here's some secrets for using this to get half way decent results. Never fill the conical shaped reservoir with more than 1" of powder. Then before you aim at the part hit the trigger and let the huge slug of powder out first. Then as you start coating the part gently agitate the entire gun to keep the powder leaving the gun at a steady and even rate. Took me forever how to work it decently.

If I did this more than a once in a long time basis I would invest in a 200-300 dollar gun, because this can be aggravating to use.

XLbrakes_40.jpg

OK, the brackets are sand blasted. I use coal slag.

XLbrakes_42.jpg

I preheat all my parts for a couple of reasons. First this burns off any oils left on the parts that would otherwise ruin the powder and also it allows the powder to cure on the part as I'm spraying and I can much better judge when to stop.

XLbrakes_41.jpg

Out of the oven and the part is at 400˚F.

XLbrakes_43.jpg

It's really easy to put too much on or not enough. I'm guilty of both. Not enough and it will look horrible. Where as too much and you risk cracking it by tightening down fasteners and whatnot.

So after it's coated enough, back in the oven to finish curing.

XLbrakes_47.jpg

When they are done and cooled you can install them.

XLbrakes_48.jpg

like so.

XLbrakes_49.jpg

They look pretty darn good for home made.

OK I hope I didn't bore too much with the minutiae of making a simple bracket.

The next post will finish the plumbing on the rear axle.
 

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Discussion Starter #83
Rear Disc Brakes Continued and Axle Vent

XLbrakes_50.jpg

Next up is to make the stainless right and left brake lines. I use to 10 gauge solid house wire to model them.

XLbrakes_51.jpg

Armed with the bits to make them.

XLbrakes_52.jpg

Done. Looks simple but good grief does it take time.

XLbrakes_53.jpg

Vent hose.

I wanted to show this in case anyone was interested in making the equivalent of a certified aviation line. If the Russel brake lines I whinged on about in a previous post fail, then this is exactly what I'll be using. These fittings and hoses are rated to 3000 PSI and you can make them at home.

Plus this hose and fitting is only a few bucks more than the automotive grade AN hardware speed shops sell like that Russel brake AN hose. So why not have the real deal.

XLbrakes_54.jpg

First thing you need to do is true up the ends with a square cut.

XLbrakes_55.jpg

These are the hose ends and installation tool. You need the installation tool for the size AN fitting you are using. In this case AN-3.

XLbrakes_56.jpg

The outer sleeve actually threads onto the OD of the hose with a left hand thread. What you want to do is bottom it on the hose then back it off a couple of turns. This will help with starting the next step.

XLbrakes_57.jpg

You have to tighten the fitting end on the tool first.
XLbrakes_58.jpg


Then lube up the fitting and whilst pushing you turn to screw in as it has a right hand thread. Once the threads catch, finish tightening the outer cuff onto the hose fully then tighten the inner sleeve and remove the tool. Done. Easy Peasy.
XLbrakes_58.jpg

How this works is the outer sleeve cuts into the OD of the hose with a left hand thread. The inner sleeve not only cuts into the ID of the hose but also threads onto the outer sleeve. The right and left hand thread lock the fitting on and the inner and outer threads secure the fitting to the hose for high pressure use and is completely reusable. So when the hose ages, you unscrew the fittings and install on a new length of hose.

Continued in next post.
 

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Discussion Starter #84
Rear Axle Vent Continued

XLbrakes_60.jpg

I couldn't find the fitting I used on the LTD with the pin hole, so I found this fitting online for turbos. Same thing really only this is steel and not brass.

XLbrakes_61.jpg

Here's the vent line done up. I didn't use the original hole in the top arch of the cross brace to stick the hose into as the factory did and here's the reason why. Out here we have very fine silty dust. The Ford 9" is an energy vampire, a very strong, yet energy vampire. As a result it generates heat and oil vapor from the vent hose, if I stuck it in the brace I would have a build up of a mud ball in the frame and I don't want that. So it's arched on the back side instead where it's easy to clean on routine oil changes and full service.

XLbrakes_64.jpg

Back down on all fours.

Now onto the rest of the hydraulic brake lines and valving.

XLbrakes_62.jpg

I'm using an aftermarket reproduction of the common GM combination valve. Now they sell these valves in Disc/Drum, Drum/Drum, or Disc/Disc. This is obviously the Disc/Disc.

You're probably wondering what on earth is the difference. Here's what I've learned from all my research in a nutshell.

The Disc/Disc combo valve has two functions. There is the shuttle valve that moves to trigger the warning lamp if you loose front or rear brakes and then there is the limiting valve on the rear. Sometimes it's referred to a proportioning valve. In this case it's more of a limiting valve because of front and rear disc brakes.

Assuming you have a balanced disc brake system, meaning you have larger brakes up front (bigger pad area and bigger apply piston) than the rears and it's balanced to the weight, distribution, etc, then under normal braking you do not need anything thing else to affect pressures.

However in a panic stop, the front of the car will dip down, this is transferring weight of the car from the back to the front via the springs and inertia. This takes pressure off the back tyres and you can skid by locking the rear tyres up easier in a panic stop. So the limiting valve steps in an limits the rear pressures when they reach a high enough value so you don't lock up your rear brakes in a panic stop.

Do you need the limiting valve, no. Is it a nice feature, yes.

The reason why I'm using a GM valve is no one seems to be reproducing the Ford valves. I used a Ford shuttle valve on the '66 LTD only because it was on one of the parts galaxies as it was converted to a dual hydraulic system. I ran the Ford part number off it and it was from a '68 Mustang. I just rebuilt it and used it because I already had it.

XLbrakes_63.jpg

This is substantially bigger and heavier than the '68 Ford Mustang shuttle valve so this will need a bracket made to hold this somewhere around here.

More to come.

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #85
Brake Lines Continued
After spending some time debating where to exactly place this I came up with this bracket.

Brakelines_01.jpg

Brakelines_02.jpg

As you can see it uses the existing holes in the frame to mount. These two threaded inserts in the frame are normally used for the automatic column shift cars, but since this XL is a factory automatic floor shift they are free to use.

Brakelines_03.jpg

It also uses the original brake line distribution tee bolt hole in the side of the frame. The bracket holds the heavy GM combination valve quite stoutly in place.

Next up is plumbing the front two wheels to the valve.

Brakelines_04.jpg

The lines are pretty much routed as in the 1968 LTD/XL with factory disc brakes.

Brakelines_05.jpg

Brakelines_06.jpg


The lines and fittings are 304 stainless.

Brakelines_07.jpg

The rear line was next.

Brakelines_08.jpg


Brakelines_09.jpg


Brakelines_10.jpg

I'm taking a break from the chassis for a while as I'm a bit burnt out on it. I didn't even catch a basic mistake till well later on the rear brakes. Just goes to show when you're tired and hyper focused on the tiny details you can easily overlook the obvious errors.

The error I'm referring to is the caliper on the right side. I was so focused on the left side when I sorted it out I just put together the right side. Well I used Panther calipers and these Panther calipers are the same for the right and left side. The Explorer backing plates are L & R (mirrored). What happens is the bleed screw on the left side is close to the top but is at the bottom on the right side.

Doh! :oops:

So I ordered Explorer L & R rear calipers and that should solve that.

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #86
Interior - Rear Seats
And now for something completely different.

In taking a break from the chassis and add to that fact it snowed and was a whopping 1 degree ˚F this morning I have no desire to work outside.

None.

Even though this phase is a bit premature I have the items to complete these tasks, so why not do them inside where it's warm. Mind you I haven't tried replacing all the foam and stuffing before, so this is new to me. I read up on this and was confident I knew enough to be dangerous.
:oops:


This took me an entire day to do one bloody seat as I had to start over several times.

RearSeat_1.jpg

Here's the old seat.

RearSeat_2.jpg

It doesn't look to bad. The one nice thing about this XL, it may be the only nice thing come to think about it, is that there was no evidence that it was ever a thriving rodent metropolis.

However it did have that abandoned old car smell funk to it.
:confused:


RearSeat_3.jpg

The underside is pretty clean considering.

RearSeat_4.jpg

This was neat to find, there is a tag with the part number for the seat but also the serial number for the car.

I left this tag in place for the new covering and such.

RearSeat_5.jpg

The new seat cover. So we are changing the colour of the interior from the Ford blue to Ford palomino. These are the factory replacement style seat covers.

RearSeat_6.jpg

I wanted to replace the old stuffing and whatnot to rid that smell, but also use some more modern synthetic fibers instead of the cotton. I wanted to pick a material that would put off any future rodentia.

RearSeat_7.jpg


The seat frame cleaned up rather nicely.

There was one problem with the new lower seat cover. There was no wire in the rear material loop for the hog ring to latch onto.

seatwire1.jpg

I nicked it from the old seat cover, then made a tiny hole in the rear sewn foldover of material and inserted it in place. I guess they just forgot to put that in.

RearSeat_9.jpg

Here's the completed new seat. Here's what I learned:

I used carpet jute material to substitute for the original cotton filler as it was close to the thickness and compressibility. I used new burlap and also the same thickness new foam slab as the original. I did not use the Dacron.

In order to fit this as the original, this is what I did:

1. Trim the filler material flush with the back seat mounting flange.
2. Flip the new cover upside-down and lay the filler layers in the cover.
3. Then place the frame upside-down on top of all that.
4. Let the filler material overhang the sides and front (similar to factory)
5. Start securing the seat cover in the rear middle.
6. Once the rear middle is hog ringed then pull the rear sides to stretch.
7. Finish installing hog rings to finish securing the backside first.
8. Secure the front middle with hog rings.
9. Pull and stretch the cover over the sides of the metal frame.
10. Finish securing the front with hog rings.
11. Finish the sides with hog rings.

RearSeat_8.jpg

Done.

I figure it will take a while for the fold lines to work themselves out. But it looks a darn sight nicer and smells like new upholstery.
;)


Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #87
Please ignore this posting as the edit feature seems to be missing and this ended up being quoted rather than posted. See next post for this posting.
 

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Discussion Starter #88
Interior - Rear Seats

And now for something completely different.

In taking a break from the chassis and add to that fact it snowed and was a whopping 1 degree ˚F this morning I have no desire to work outside.

None.

Even though this phase is a bit premature I have the items to complete these tasks, so why not do them inside where it's warm. Mind you I haven't tried replacing all the foam and stuffing before, so this is new to me. I read up on this and was confident I knew enough to be dangerous.
:oops:


This took me an entire day to do one bloody seat as I had to start over several times.

RearSeat_1.jpg

Here's the old seat.

RearSeat_2.jpg

It doesn't look to bad. The one nice thing about this XL, it may be the only nice thing come to think about it, is that there was no evidence that it was ever a thriving rodent metropolis.

However it did have that abandoned old car smell funk to it.
:confused:


RearSeat_3.jpg

The underside is pretty clean considering.

RearSeat_4.jpg

This was neat to find, there is a tag with the part number for the seat but also the serial number for the car.

I left this tag in place for the new covering and such.

RearSeat_5.jpg

The new seat cover. So we are changing the colour of the interior from the Ford blue to Ford palomino. These are the factory replacement style seat covers.

RearSeat_6.jpg

I wanted to replace the old stuffing and whatnot to rid that smell, but also use some more modern synthetic fibers instead of the cotton. I wanted to pick a material that would put off any future rodentia.

RearSeat_7.jpg


The seat frame cleaned up rather nicely.

There was one problem with the new lower seat cover. There was no wire in the rear material loop for the hog ring to latch onto.

seatwire1.jpg

I nicked it from the old seat cover, then made a tiny hole in the rear sewn foldover of material and inserted it in place. I guess they just forgot to put that in.

RearSeat_9.jpg

Here's the completed new seat. Here's what I learned:

I used carpet jute material to substitute for the original cotton filler as it was close to the thickness and compressibility. I used new burlap and also the same thickness new foam slab as the original. I did not use the Dacron.

In order to fit this as the original, this is what I did:

1. Trim the filler material flush with the back seat mounting flange.
2. Flip the new cover upside-down and lay the filler layers in the cover.
3. Then place the frame upside-down on top of all that.
4. Let the filler material overhang the sides and front (similar to factory)
5. Start securing the seat cover in the rear middle.
6. Once the rear middle is hog ringed then pull the rear sides to stretch.
7. Finish installing hog rings to finish securing the backside first.
8. Secure the front middle with hog rings.
9. Pull and stretch the cover over the sides of the metal frame.
10. Finish securing the front with hog rings.
11. Finish the sides with hog rings.

RearSeat_8.jpg

Done.

I figure it will take a while for the fold lines to work themselves out. But it looks a darn sight nicer and smells like new upholstery.
;)


Cheers
 

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XL,

Great work as always. I see we use a lot of similar methods and tools. I think I have the exact same double flaring tool.

I also use a lot of cardboard and blue tape to make templates. I find Sam Adams 12 pack boxes work well for most projects. Luckily I seem to have a steady supply of them.

I'm jealous of the powder coating set up - nice job with all of that. Something I have thought about but I don't want to give up the space. So it's wet paint for me, although I know someone who recently opened a powder coat business nearby.

Excellent timing on the rear seat write up - I just tore down my front and rear seats this past weekend. I took a lot of photos and I'm planning to post a recap soon. I've got a lot of work to do first though. My seat springs are in pretty rough shape. Rusty and some of the springs are broken. Rodents!!!! I'm hoping to have the springs fixed up and painted before the reproduction upholstery arrives. Your description and photos are a big help and that rear seat bottom came out great! I hope I can obtain similar results.

Keep up the great work, and I look forward to more of your updates!

- John
 

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Discussion Starter #90
XL,

Great work as always. I see we use a lot of similar methods and tools. I think I have the exact same double flaring tool.

I also use a lot of cardboard and blue tape to make templates. I find Sam Adams 12 pack boxes work well for most projects. Luckily I seem to have a steady supply of them.

I'm jealous of the powder coating set up - nice job with all of that. Something I have thought about but I don't want to give up the space. So it's wet paint for me, although I know someone who recently opened a powder coat business nearby.

Excellent timing on the rear seat write up - I just tore down my front and rear seats this past weekend. I took a lot of photos and I'm planning to post a recap soon. I've got a lot of work to do first though. My seat springs are in pretty rough shape. Rusty and some of the springs are broken. Rodents!!!! I'm hoping to have the springs fixed up and painted before the reproduction upholstery arrives. Your description and photos are a big help and that rear seat bottom came out great! I hope I can obtain similar results.

Keep up the great work, and I look forward to more of your updates!

- John
Hello gearheadct,

Thank you for the kind words. All this is a steep learning curve for me. I am not a mechanic, I live elsewhere. :) I have read through your thread as well and it's a very ambitious project you've undertaken. I do like the detailed work you've done, especially in making your own mounts, etc.

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #91
Interior - Rear Seats Continued
I thought I'd finish up the rear seats.

RearUpperBackSeat_05.jpg

I thought the lower seat was difficult. This was the involved one.

RearUpperBackSeat_01.jpg

The upper rear seat back has loads of cotton in it especially sewn into the sides, top and bottom to make the edges around the seat puffy.

This must have taken loads of time to sew up and crudely form to this seat. They would have been better off molding foam to these seats as in the fronts. Why they didn't do that I'll never know.

RearUpperBackSeat_02.jpg

RearUpperBackSeat_03.jpg

RearUpperBackSeat_04.jpg

I had to come up with a way to make the new material work in a similar fashion. In this case I used the roll of Dacron as it simulates the cotton in compressibility and softness. I also used the jute material as well as the burlap.

RearUpperBackSeat_06.jpg

The new seat cover.

RearUpperBackSeat_07.jpg

I bought new seat emblems as the old ones were pretty scratched up and the faux wood applique was peeling off.

RearUpperBackSeat_08.jpg

First I needed the metal cups behind the emblems in the old seat, plus the metal wire in the lower material fold over as the new seat cover was missing that as well, just like the lower seat cover was missing its wire. So you do have to reuse some bits off the old seat covers.

RearUpperBackSeat_10.jpg

I carefully measured and installed the new emblems with the old cups and Styrofoam glued to the backside as in the factory covers.

RearUpperBackSeat_09.jpg

You can see how the old seat cotton/backing is more less formed the hard way. On the seat frame there is a separate piece of sewn burlap with support and that is installed first. This piece was disintegrating and need to be made first.

Continued in next post.
 

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Discussion Starter #92
Interior - Rear Seats Continued

RearUpperBackSeat_11.jpg

I had to sew the channels/fold overs into the new burlap. I went and bought a sewing machine at Wally World. I opted for the heavy duty version with no electronic controls (other than the speed control). I figured buy the most simple and robust machine I could so it would last. This little guy worked fantastic right out the box.

RearUpperBackSeat_12.jpg

Inserted the wire in the sewn channels.

RearUpperBackSeat_13.jpg

That was secured with hog rings first on the cleaned metal frame.

Next I layered the jute, Dacron and burlap roughly into place and then laid the metal frame atop and started at the middle bottom and worked outwards on the bottom until it was secured. Now the tricky bit was leaving enough Dacron overhanging and pulling on the burlap to act as a pocket for the Dacron to sit and put tension on the sides so they would puff out. This took quite some time. I did end up undoing some of it and removing excess Dacron and stuff it in places where there wasn't enough.

RearUpperBackSeat_14.jpg

As you can see I used the burlap excess to form pockets to hold the Dacron in place.

What a pain in the........

RearUpperBackSeat_15.jpg


But it's done. Again it will need some heat and sun in the summer to work out the wrinkles from sitting so long folded.

RearUpperBackSeat_16.jpg

That concludes the rear seat.

Boy I can't wait to get the body done to start installing this and the rest of the interior.

It's funny how this is quite a modern colour. It's very Star Trek - Next Generation colour. :geek: However the ordinary more common colours offered like blues, reds, etc are very 60's/70's. But you do not see too many 3rd generation Fords with this color.

More to come.
 

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Very nice work and thanks for documenting this.

I've always been afraid to tackle upholstery work myself.
Seeing it done like this I think I may give it a try! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #94
Very nice work and thanks for documenting this.

I've always been afraid to tackle upholstery work myself.
Seeing it done like this I think I may give it a try! :)
Hello galaxiex,

You're welcome for showing this. Trust me if I can do it, you can do it as I was more or less shooting from the hip on this. I didn't need much more than what I showed. I had a real sharp pair of good quality metal scissors, a Sharpie marker, pliers and a ruler to measure where the emblems should go. I even did all the work you see in a small section of the living room right where the pictures were taken. Plus I was watching the first season of the Monkees whilst doing it to kill the tediousness of this. Agh that takes me back. :giggle:

Cheers
 

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XL,

Your upholstery posts have been a huge help. I was contemplating the best way to replace the old filler materials and you have already solved it! Can you tell me what you used for seat foam (thickness, firmness, etc.)? And where you got the dacron and jute padding?

Have you opened up the fronts yet? The seat backs use a jute type material glued to the back of the frame. I think your carpet padding will be a good match.

That rear seat came out great!!

- John
 

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Discussion Starter #96
Hello gearheadct,

Thank you for the kind words. Here's the links to the materials; jute, foam, burlap and Dacron.

Dacron
Foam slab
Jute
Burlap

They are all sold from Amazon. Even if you wish to buy from somewhere else you can click the links for the specifications on each item.

As for the fronts I haven't opened them up per se. They more or less just fell apart on their own. The foam and material just crumbled. The foam in the front seats has less moisture than a saltine cracker that's been in the desert for 30 years. I do have new molded foam inserts for the front seats top and bottom. Hopefully the fronts will turn out as nice as the rear did.

Cheers
 

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Thanks for the links XL. I am placing some orders now...

Despite the XL in your user name, I forgot you had bucket seats up front. I'm guessing you don't have the jute backing that I mentioned above. I'm working on a front bench so very different. Molded foam for the bottom (not reproduced so I'll have to shape some standard foam). The bench seat backs have no foam - just the dense cotton padding with a muslin material covering it. I am thinking I'll use standard foam. I'll start a new thread to show the process but it might be a while before I have enough progress to make it worth reading.

- John
 

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Discussion Starter #98
Thanks for the links XL. I am placing some orders now...

Despite the XL in your user name, I forgot you had bucket seats up front. I'm guessing you don't have the jute backing that I mentioned above. I'm working on a front bench so very different. Molded foam for the bottom (not reproduced so I'll have to shape some standard foam). The bench seat backs have no foam - just the dense cotton padding with a muslin material covering it. I am thinking I'll use standard foam. I'll start a new thread to show the process but it might be a while before I have enough progress to make it worth reading.

- John
Hello gearheadct,

Just take your time and plan for a whole day and you'll do fine. If you start getting impatient or frustrated walk away and come back later. :)

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #99
Rear Brakes Finished

Hello again, I finally was able to finish the rear brake debacle today. What an adventure to install Ford rear disc brakes.

brakes_01.jpg

This is the hardware for the centre mount parking brake lever. Please ignore the hardware in the upper left hand corner, that's the beginnings of the body mount hardware. The spring on the rack is the parking brake main return spring. That's how I sandblast and powder coat the springs.

I use the same fixture to also mount the hood hinge springs I just use the end hole in the pipe with the bolt for the longer spring.

brakes_02.jpg


The rope makes loading and unloading stiff springs a breeze.

brakes_03.jpg

brakes_04.jpg

I mounted the new parking brake cables into the frame.

brakes_05.jpg

brakes_06.jpg


Then bolted the transmission cross member, assembled the parking brake lever and attached the parking brake cables.

brakes_07.jpg

Now the determination of whether or not the backing plates are best placed like this or switch from L & R and inverted. At first this arrangement seemed like the best possible chance to work.

brakes_08.jpg

But the cable casing is just too long.

brakes_09.jpg

Yup too long. With that I took apart the axle again and switched the backing plates from left to right and rotated 180˚. Now the parking brake cable enters from the top and uses more cable length. Which turned out to be a much better fit than this.

brakes_10.jpg

As for my last mistake of using Panther calipers that had one side with the bleed screw on the bottom, I bought Exploder, errr Explorer calipers that have an actual L & R side.

Continued in next post.
 

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Discussion Starter #100
Rear Brakes Finished, Continued

After cleaning and powder coating the Explorer calipers I went to install them on the chassis and I couldn't get the pads to go over the rotor. It was as if the Panther rotor was a hair to thick. At first I thought I was doing something wrong why would a rotor be ever so slightly different.

Well I turned to Rock Auto since they often list the specifications for parts and good grief the Explorer rotor is 0.075" thinner than the Panther, but otherwise dimensionally the same.

I wanted to be done with this so I just bought them locally.

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Twice the price but I can install these.

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Give me strength FORD... You really had to make TWO different parts with this tiny difference?! Talk about mismanagement. This is something I would expect from GM. But this is what was needed the calipers with fresh pads slid over them.

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Round 2 of new rotors.

But FORD wasn't done with me yet. I installed the caliper and went to attach the banjo bolt for the brake hose and it's not threading. The 2000 Panther uses a 3/8 coarse banjo bolt and the 2000 Explorer uses a 3/8 fine thread banjo bolt.

This is lunacy.

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A 2000 Ford with SAE/English hardware when everything else is metric. I stopped trying to figure this out. But the caliper was attached once more.

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Next was to make reusable hooks that would attach to the parking brake cable and latch onto the parking brake lever. That spring is the original spring that came on the cables meant for drum brakes.

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So I made these. They are nothing fancy, just 1/2" rod 304 stainless for the main body and 1/4" 304 rod to make the loop and then two 1/4-20 set screws to secure the cable to them.

I need to think about repairs in the future since this is going to be a daily driver. If I need to replace the parking brake cables for any reason these can be unscrewed and used on the new cable(s).

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I powder coated the original cable clamps and installed them in the same fashion to secure the parking brake cable to the lower control arms.

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So now you can see the parking brake cable (inner piece) is too long and needs to be cut and the spring reduced in size as well.

Continued in next post.
 
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