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There is no good way to fix this and for now this will do. This bothers me and afterwards when the car is done I will probably remake the tailpipes from scratch because this doesn't look all that great.
Great job and thanks for sharing all of these pictures and details with us! It's VERY helpful. You could blend these welds with a pipe sander? I'll bet you could make those welds invisible.

166019
 

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Discussion Starter #163
Hello everyone,

I just wanted to say thank you to those with the encouraging and kind comments. It's unfortunate, but it happens that some people are just not happy and go off the boil as it were with their comments. Why they read the threads if they hate it in the first place befuddles me, but the world is a crazy place lately and I just stopped trying to figure it out. I saw he was banned from this site as I wasn't the only one he went off on. I wish him well, hope he finds peace and hope he's not married to a real estate agent. :whistle:
 

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Discussion Starter #164
One last point I forgot to make about my threads. They are really a build notebook in a way for me. Much in the same way you have to keep notes and pictures when building a homebuilt aircraft. Whilst I do not need the FAA's blessing on my car I do need to seek specialty insurance for the worth I believe it to be and not book value as book value is a small fraction of what the parts and reasonable labour costs are going into these cars. I just thought instead of making a private build note I would share it amongst the old car crowd and maybe someone would like read it and see what others are doing.

That's the idea behind my threads anyway, if someone else gets ideas or this helps them out, great.

And now back to the program :giggle:
 

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Discussion Starter #165
Clock

I took a bit of a sidestep and finished the clock. Sometimes you need a break and focus on some other more interesting part of the car. Clocks now-a-days seem so trivial as they are either a digital part of the radio or sat nav. But 50 years ago they were a mechanical precision instrument.

This one was dead however as most old mechanical automotive clocks ended up.

clock_04.jpg



This is the clock cover and you can see, it had many many years of service as the points inside the clock arced themselves to near oblivion. Actually all this crud was all over the gear train and ironically saved the clock from further damage. Let me explain.

clock_01.jpg



This is the gear train after I washed and lightly brushed it with lacquer thinner. The flywheel would not oscillate as it was covered in burnt bits of points. The winder, mainspring and mainspring drive gear are removed here.

clock_02.jpg



You can see the points are just about worn away, that's a lot of arcing over the years. What usually happens to these old clocks is at some point in the cars long life the battery is allowed to slowly drain, either from accidentally leaving the lights on or just plain neglect. The winder is a high current intermittent device and relies on at least 9 volts to effectively whack one set of the points on a one way clutch and wind the main spring up ever so slightly. If the battery voltage falls off the winder can't slap the points hard enough and it stays engaged and the windings will burn.

The grunge on the gear train allowed one last winding and there it stayed with the winder disengaged and most likely saved it.

There were a couple of problems with this clock aside from all that. First the centre screw on the winder board must have vibrated out over the years and when I tried to separate the cover from the clock the tension snapped the board near the outside screws. I had to use a strong industrial adhesive to affix that back together. The other problem was the points are just about obliterated.

clock_03.jpg



So what I've done is use a solder with a high percentage of silver in it to build the points back up and file smooth as best I could.

clock_05.jpg



One of the modifications I made was to include a freewheeling or flyback diode across the coil and this greatly reduced arcing. This is a 5 amp fast recovery Schottky diode. This should greatly extend the life of the points.

clock_07.jpg



After I oiled and blew off the residual heavy oil with canned air the clock works great. Interesting tidbit about these clocks is the semi-auto adjust feature. Say the clock is too fast, every time you adjust the clock backwards to correct another gear set is activated on the initial movement that takes a bit of tension off the hair spring to slow the flywheel down, thereby slowing down the clock. It works in the opposite fashion as well. There is a slot on the side of the clock for a manual speed adjustment if you wish to time against a stopwatch, of which I did. I let it run for a week on the bench and it was on the money.

clock_06.jpg



I also experimented with different light bulbs. The clock lamp is an 1816, however it's a pretty high wattage bright little bulb that generates a great deal of heat. I also noticed that the light reflects inside the rear cover and so a bright inside surface is required. Also the 1816 is a long nose bulb with its filament close to the back of the winder board. This doesn't do much good for the illumination to the front.

I experimented with a variety of different light bulbs I had on hand and discovered the 1895 (same as the dash turn signal indicators) illuminate just as bright and are lower wattage wise so lower heat. The bulb is a bit shorter and puts the filament a bit closer to the back of the clock and sheds effectively a similar amount of light forward as the long nose bulb with the benefit of less heat.

It is after all a precision instrument and not a miniature Easy Bake Oven. :unsure:

clock_09.jpg



I experimented with a variety of bulbs. These are both completed clocks for both '66 cars.

clock_10.jpg



Tis the difference between the bulbs.

clock_08.jpg



A note on what I used for this endeavor. You need a high wattage soldering gun to solder to the big brass lug, otherwise you risk cooking everything, including the diode, trying to get the solder to melt. You want to heat up quickly as possible, melt the solder then cool. To keep the diode cool I inverted the duster can and let the liquid refrigerant boil on the leads to take the heat and cool off the large peg.

The oil I used was Tri-Flow with TPFE, once I oiled it I blew off the excess from the gear train with the canned duster. The lab squeeze bottle has lacquer thinner in it for cleaning the gear train. I used the regular low wattage soldering iron to build up the points and solder the diode to the small metal post.

Next up more trials and tribulations with the engine.

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #166
Engine Part II

As a refresher I received the engine back the first time from the machinist and it had rust really bad in one cylinder of which it needed to be sleeved. I had asked for the cooling jackets to be cleaned as well and they were unsatisfactory as there was still loose chunks inside the core plug holes (I could wipe my finger inside and pull out a bit on my finger). I had also stated on the work order I wanted all the oil gallery welch plugs removed and drilled and threaded for screw in plugs.

Originally I had brought him Clevite cam bearings of which the first time I picked it up they were installed. However because he had to dip the block again he punched out my bearings and then provided some Durabond bearings. That didn't bode well with me.

So the second time I went down to pick it up he said he needs to fit the camshaft to the bearings. Now he had to sleeve the rusty cylinder as something was sprayed on this engine to cause severe rust on that cylinder after it was all machined. That irritated me.

Whilst he is hacking away at these Durabond bearings trying to get the cam in I stuck my finger in the core plug hole and still pluked out flakes of rust. Then I noticed the front oil gallery hole where the distributor lies isn't tapped. He says he never does those on FE's. I'm just rolling my eyes at this point because on the previous two FE's he did for me he did do that one.

There are shavings all over the engine insides now because the cam will not fit. He's going to town on those cam bearings with a bearing file and removing big scary chunks of bearing. I'm just cringing. Then he starts talking to his fellow machinist compatriot about how much trouble they are having with Durabond bearings and how nicely the Clevites worked that I brought him initially. So my internal monologue is going a mile a minute and saying then why are you using them?????

At that point I had resigned myself to calling this a wash and just wanted my engine block back and I'll sort out the rest, even though I already paid for these services. I couldn't take it anymore.


engine_01.jpg



This is the engine from the second time around from the machine shop with its sleeve.


engine_02.jpg



That is one hacked up Durabond bearing and the came still will not fit.


engine_03.jpg



Now he did do a good job on the sleeving at least from what I can see.


engine_04.jpg



You can barely tell the sleeve line.


engine_06.jpg



I realize it's only surface rust on the inside but this isn't what I would call professional work.


engine_05.jpg



There's still rust flakes inside the cooling jackets. I can't have this floating the around the cooling system mostly because of the HVAC system.


engine_07.jpg



For those not familiar with 1965-1968 factory air con systems, there is no mechanical blend door to modulate heat. This system uses modulated vacuum at the coolant valve to carefully meter coolant through the heater core. Any junk in the system can cause the valve to stick open and leave the heat on or even jamb the valve closed causing no heat.

Or even worse partially or fully plug the heater core and look where it is located. Who wants to remove a bumper, the bonnet and the outer front wing to change that. I think I speak for everyone when I say, no one does.


engine_08.jpg



I ended up having to buy a cam bearing tool. I really didn't want to, but these Durabond cam bearings need to come out.


engine_09.jpg



Glad I did because look at the rust inside the oil gallery. This is just unacceptable.

The machinist told me I'd never get the engine as clean as I wanted it.

What could I say to that..... other than..... Challenge Accepted!


engine_10.jpg



Took me a day of acid spraying and wire brushing with all different kinds of brass wire brushes. The junk I removed from the cooling jackets was still pretty impressive.

More in the next post.
 

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Discussion Starter #167
Engine Part II Continued


engine_12.jpg



It was loads of work, but I feel it was worth it.


engine_15.jpg




engine_17.jpg



I drilled and tapped that last oil gallery, that was a pain as I had to get creative with a standard 1/4 NPT tap as they are short.


engine_18.jpg



Oil passages are cleaned too.


engine_19.jpg



Yet another round of Clevite cam bearings.


engine_20.jpg



I fully admit I was nervous as I had never done this before and from what I've read it was stated it's easy to destroy a cam bearing putting them in. Well all that apprehension I had was unnecessary because if you exercise common sense they go in just fine. On the FE the outside dimension is different on every bearing so make sure you install them in the right order. I started from the back and worked my way forward.

Now on the 4 rear ones on this block it didn't matter where the oil hole was placed because of the circular oil groove in all four bearing housings in the block. One FE book said the back bearing needed to be keyed, but I didn't find that to be the case here. Perhaps older blocks? Just dunno.

Since it didn't matter where the oil hole went for my OCD sake I referenced my bare '68 390 block and Ford installed the rear 4 cam bearings with the oil hole at 3 O'Clock. Well so did I.


engine_21.jpg



Now the front one does need to be clocked like so otherwise you'll starve the either lower distributor guide in the block or the front cam bearing altogether.


engine_22.jpg



Easy Peasy.


engine_23.jpg



I lubed the cam and it fit in, although it was a bit tight, but it did go in relatively easy, unlike the Durabonds that the cam wouldn't make it in half way. I'll need to surface the high spots on the cam bearings.

continued in next post.
 

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Discussion Starter #168
Engine Part II Continued

engine_23.jpg




To fit the cam all I did was rotate it, remove and note the high burnished areas on the cam bearings and just scrub them with green Scotch-Brite pads. I repeated this several times till the cam rotated freely and smoothly. This is the first time I had done this so I was careful not to remove too much material.


engine_25.jpg



I had to install the rear cam plug and the rear oil gallery plugs.


engine_26.jpg



I had to get a little creative to fixture the block whilst tapping in the rear plug with sealant. I used an old suspension bushing housing and it was the right size.


engine_28.jpg



Next up are the main bearings.


engine_29.jpg




engine_30.jpg



Time to see how good the cut and polish is on the crankshaft.


engine_31.jpg



I have my Plastigauge laid in dry bearings ready for the crush.


engine_32.jpg



Credit where credit is due, nice even pattern at just under 0.002" clearance. All bearings were the same. Credit where credits due, well done on the crank mains machining.


engine_33.jpg



It may be hard to tell from the picture but they are all the same width.


engine_34.jpg



With that, the crank was removed, cleaned one last time, lubed the bearings and with a new rear main seal kit, the crankshaft was torqued down. It spins by hand smoothly. The camshaft is also lubed and installed.

Continued in next post.
 

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Discussion Starter #169
Engine Part II Continued


engine_35.jpg



OK at this point I was feeling pretty good. I had thought to myself things are looking up and I'm on a roll.....

And that my friends is where the progress ended because.............


engine_37.jpg



As I was laying out the brand new pistons from Diamond to assemble onto the brand new rods I had this funny feeling something wasn't quite right. But I just couldn't put my finger on it at this point. Can you?


engine_36.jpg



Sorry for the bad lighting, but here's a closeup. All the little "F's" are to the left as that is the front of the engine. It's funny I couldn't put my finger on it but my subconscious was screaming go look at the cylinder heads.


engine_38.jpg



Here's the mock up engine on the chassis.

Oh crap they didn't.

They did.

They flipped the exhaust and intake reliefs on two pistons on each side (4 wrong pistons).

This is the 3rd consecutive mistake from Diamond Pistons. These are not cheap either. I can't fathom why people can't do their job properly. As the guy from Vice Grip Garage would say, "somebody help me understand"......

So this portion of the car is dead in the water till Diamond makes and ships me 4 correct replacement pistons. For now the engine will get a bag over it with a dunce cap on and sit in the corner.


engine_39.jpg



Well at least they put the offsets for the pins on the correct side of the pistons....

<sigh>

Till next time.

Cheers
 

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Wow, this is truly epic! I love that you're rebuilding the clock. I've done the same with my 65 and just got a NOS one for my '65 Mercury. I was not aware of the self-adjust function, and only saw the adjuster on the back, which seems a little touchy. Can you elaborate on how to adjust the speed? Is it possible to correct it after it's installed? I had mine running great and accurately on the bench, but the second hand was slipping when I reassembled it and had it in the car. When I pulled it out and fixed that, something must have fallen out of adjustment and now it runs horribly fast. I appreciate the amazing detail of your project! Very, very well done!!! Thank you!
 

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Been doing engines, suspensions, diffs, etc, for over 40 years for myself and others. You have to check everything from a supplier now. I worked in a parts store and at a Ford dealership. First thing they say is "it was correct when it left here, you must have switched them". Yeah right. Another thing I learned the hard way. Flush out new torque convertors with trans fluid before installing. I had one that had glass beads still in it that would have trashed the trans.
When ever I had machine work done, I always got my block back and cleaned it before having the cam bearings installed, (school of hard knocks) and then when I did pick it up after they were installed, took my new cam with me to test it, before leaving.
Some shops love Fords and some love Chevy. I always try and look around and talk to them to see which it is. I've found it makes a difference on their workmanship and knowledge of the little things on different makes. The shop I had machine my block, heads, balancing and crank we talked for several hours before, so we BOTH knew what I wanted and what his knowledge and skill level was of Fords. Also let him know that I knew what I was doing. One question he asked told me a lot right off. "Do you want the crank bearing clearances on the high or low side of the specs.? .0015-0025. And piston clearance that I wanted and what he recommended. The use of bolts or studs, ARP studs for the main caps and heads, I supplied prior to machining. Most use the old and then switch afterwards, which changes everything.
As for the clown that doesn't like all your pics? Screw him. Many people learn from them and the trial and error of bolts, fittings, (have a wide assortment of them myself now) year to year changes that you find out when you get it apart. Ford did a lot of midyear changes that most people don't know. Says others with less experience a lot of grief, time and money.
I see you're in the desert. Engine rust isn't a common thing out here, I live by Reno , Nv.
 

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One last point I forgot to make about my threads. They are really a build notebook in a way for me. Much in the same way you have to keep notes and pictures when building a homebuilt aircraft. Whilst I do not need the FAA's blessing on my car I do need to seek specialty insurance for the worth I believe it to be and not book value as book value is a small fraction of what the parts and reasonable labour costs are going into these cars. I just thought instead of making a private build note I would share it amongst the old car crowd and maybe someone would like read it and see what others are doing.

That's the idea behind my threads anyway, if someone else gets ideas or this helps them out, great.

And now back to the program :giggle:
Glad to see that you're back. Just yesterday I was looking over this thread because I remembered you had posted about modifying some body cushions. My frame is going out to be media blasted on Tuesday and I wasn't able to come up with the proper round radiator support cushions for when I get it back. Being able to read through your experience as well as having pictures to look at helps me immensely and I have no doubt it helps many others as well.

I should say that not only you but everyone on here that contributes with information, pictures, knowledge and experience only benefits us all. Sometimes people are just plain proud of something they accomplished and want to share it with others for no reason other than to hear "Nice job, that looks great!" Well, you know what? I'm guilty of that. When someone else can appreciate what you've done it helps to keep the fire burning and gives one the encouragement to keep going.

How and why that became something that so enrages some, I have no answer for.

Anyway, I'm happy that you're back here and hope that you and everyone else continues to post pictures, add commentary and share experience and knowledge with all of us.
 

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Discussion Starter #173
Wow, this is truly epic! I love that you're rebuilding the clock. I've done the same with my 65 and just got a NOS one for my '65 Mercury. I was not aware of the self-adjust function, and only saw the adjuster on the back, which seems a little touchy. Can you elaborate on how to adjust the speed? Is it possible to correct it after it's installed? I had mine running great and accurately on the bench, but the second hand was slipping when I reassembled it and had it in the car. When I pulled it out and fixed that, something must have fallen out of adjustment and now it runs horribly fast. I appreciate the amazing detail of your project! Very, very well done!!! Thank you!
Hello Jazzmeister,

Thank you for the kind words. As for the clock perhaps pictures are best.

166209


Here's a parts clock and as I mentioned before what I find to be the normal failure of these clocks; cooked windings. You can see the side access port on the case, but it's much easier to remove the case if you want to do a gross adjustment on the bench speed wise.

166210


This was a bit tricky trying to get a decent photograph of a cramped and complex space. The screwdriver points to the lever that part of the hair spring passes through. This is not the tether point of the spring but interestingly enough affects the shape of the spring as it contracts and expands and affects its oscillation period.

This lever is part of a half moon spur gear underneath, very similar to a window regulator. This meshes with a dual spur gear for gear reduction then to the final spur that has a really tiny star wheel on it. This star wheel adjusts exactly like the star wheel adjuster on drum brakes. The only difference is on drum brakes it adjusts in one direction only and on these clocks it can adjust in either direction (depends if you advancing or retarding the hands of the clock by the front knob).

166211


You can get a better view of the little adjuster hook and very very tiny teeth on the star wheel (bottom of picture).

166212


Perhaps a better view. To make a big adjustment on the bench you have to very carefully lift the hook off the start wheel without bending it and then adjust the hairspring lever. Otherwise the hook will drag on the star wheel you might bend the lever atop.

166213


So the hook is spot welded to this sliver plate standing up with the two little X's in it. This shifts the hook in the direction you're adjusting the knob by a slip clutch. This is one reason why the adjustment knob on the front of the clock is hard to turn. Every time you adjust the clock by the front knob you move the star wheel one tiny notch and that moves a gear reduction network to move the hairspring lever an infinitesimal amount. Now to make quick adjustments by the front knob, just pull the knob and lightly jockey back and forth just enough to nudge the minute hand, this will move the star wheel every time you jockey it. If it's to far out you'll have to remove it from the car and pop the cover off and lift up very carefully on the little hook on the star wheel then make a gross adjustment on the hairspring lever to bring it back closer to nominal.

Then you can fine tune the jockey method from the front knob. I know most people would brush off an old clock, but I do appreciate the amount of engineering that went into this. It's quite a complicated precision instrument.

Let me also say I do have an admiration for anyone who takes the time to fix a trivial item like a clock or the original radio on their car.

Now I have seen quartz conversion kits for these clocks some years back, I wonder if they still make them.

Good luck with your clock. Feel free to post some pictures as well.

Cheers!
 

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Discussion Starter #174
Been doing engines, suspensions, diffs, etc, for over 40 years for myself and others. You have to check everything from a supplier now. I worked in a parts store and at a Ford dealership. First thing they say is "it was correct when it left here, you must have switched them". Yeah right. Another thing I learned the hard way. Flush out new torque convertors with trans fluid before installing. I had one that had glass beads still in it that would have trashed the trans.
When ever I had machine work done, I always got my block back and cleaned it before having the cam bearings installed, (school of hard knocks) and then when I did pick it up after they were installed, took my new cam with me to test it, before leaving.
Some shops love Fords and some love Chevy. I always try and look around and talk to them to see which it is. I've found it makes a difference on their workmanship and knowledge of the little things on different makes. The shop I had machine my block, heads, balancing and crank we talked for several hours before, so we BOTH knew what I wanted and what his knowledge and skill level was of Fords. Also let him know that I knew what I was doing. One question he asked told me a lot right off. "Do you want the crank bearing clearances on the high or low side of the specs.? .0015-0025. And piston clearance that I wanted and what he recommended. The use of bolts or studs, ARP studs for the main caps and heads, I supplied prior to machining. Most use the old and then switch afterwards, which changes everything.
As for the clown that doesn't like all your pics? Screw him. Many people learn from them and the trial and error of bolts, fittings, (have a wide assortment of them myself now) year to year changes that you find out when you get it apart. Ford did a lot of midyear changes that most people don't know. Says others with less experience a lot of grief, time and money.
I see you're in the desert. Engine rust isn't a common thing out here, I live by Reno , Nv.

Hello rickyracer1983,

Thank you for sharing your thoughts on this. I didn't even think to check a rebuilt torque converter. As for my machinist, he did my other 2 FE blocks and he did what I thought was a darn good job. It's like he's a different person this time around. I didn't get that. His personality seemed to change. Maybe he's having a bad time, dunno. But doesn't change the fact that a service was paid for and it was done poorly. That really was the crux of my rant earlier here.

As for the engine rust, there were two separate problems causing this. Something was sprayed, hopefully accidentally, on the engine after it was all machined and it was corrosive, perhaps a salt or acid and it just pitted the freshly machined cylinder wall up. The other thing I noticed at the machine shop is he's using evaporative cooling. All that does is put more water in the air and I'm sure in Reno it's hot and dry and "swamp coolers" are also the mainstay.

I installed a mini split refrigerated air con in my shop so it's really dry in there to alleviate such problems as this and keep tools and projects from oxidizing unnecessarily.

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #175
Glad to see that you're back. Just yesterday I was looking over this thread because I remembered you had posted about modifying some body cushions. My frame is going out to be media blasted on Tuesday and I wasn't able to come up with the proper round radiator support cushions for when I get it back. Being able to read through your experience as well as having pictures to look at helps me immensely and I have no doubt it helps many others as well.

I should say that not only you but everyone on here that contributes with information, pictures, knowledge and experience only benefits us all. Sometimes people are just plain proud of something they accomplished and want to share it with others for no reason other than to hear "Nice job, that looks great!" Well, you know what? I'm guilty of that. When someone else can appreciate what you've done it helps to keep the fire burning and gives one the encouragement to keep going.

How and why that became something that so enrages some, I have no answer for.

Anyway, I'm happy that you're back here and hope that you and everyone else continues to post pictures, add commentary and share experience and knowledge with all of us.
Hello 289Galaxie,

About the body cushions, so on this '66 gal 500 XL I reused the original pads because they were in really good condition. Now on the '66 LTD thread those were obliterated so I had to slice up some new pads in that generic kit they sell for these 3rd gens to make new front radiator support mounts. If I remember right I do have some pictures of that.

I found them, I'll just post them here if you need them rather than hunt through countless old postings.

166214


166215


166216


I had to get creative with these to make something work half way reasonable. Looking back I could have done a better job, but this was my first chassis (LTD) I ever redid from the ground up. The learning curve on this one was ginormous. By the time I get to my '68 XL I might have this down to a science, who knows. :geek:

One last thing, thank you for what you said earlier above, I know I am a bit slap dash on my postings, but I have other things too I am working on. We recently had our monsoons and they were heavy this year. 3 weeks in a row; every day it rained and it was just humid, hot and miserable. Those days I work in the lab. Plus I have another body work type project out in the shop that is sucking a bit of time away from the cars.

166217


It's an old government surplus instrumentation rack. I have already refurbished its twin and it's in the lab, but this one needs to be straightened, taken completely apart, stripped down and repainted like its sibling. It's out of the way in the usual car pictures but none-the-less it's right there and needs to be finished. Now the the rains have abated and the %RH is decreasing I can paint this.

Good luck with your mounts. Are you going to paint your chassis yourself?

Cheers
 

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THANK YOU so much for the extremely detailed explanation of the clock! I am beyond impressed with your knowledge and skill, and it’s truly inspirational. I have a couple spares, so I’ll have to study those workings more. Much appreciated!!
 

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Just ignore Mr. Troll, and keep up the fantastic work. As Derek at Vice Grip Garage would say, it's "mind bottling"!
 

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Good luck with your mounts. Are you going to paint your chassis yourself?
Cheers
Thanks for posting the pics. What I have left for mounts that are close to the ones I need are pictured below. They're the correct diameter but too thick and the center hole is too large. I suppose I can grind down the cushions to the correct thickness but the inner hole has me stumped. I know you used some sort of specialty hose and glued it in but I can't find anything the correct size. Do you happen to remember what you used?

Regarding painting the frame, yes I'll do it myself. I'm not trying for anything show quality, just something that will protect it. I saw that Eastwood has a kit with a brush on rust encapsulator and four cans of chassis black spray paint. I've also heard others that swear by POR 15. Your thoughts?

On a side note, I don't know how you find the time/energy to take on even more projects than you already have going!

IMG_1474.jpg


IMG_1473.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #179
Thanks for posting the pics. What I have left for mounts that are close to the ones I need are pictured below. They're the correct diameter but too thick and the center hole is too large. I suppose I can grind down the cushions to the correct thickness but the inner hole has me stumped. I know you used some sort of specialty hose and glued it in but I can't find anything the correct size. Do you happen to remember what you used?

Regarding painting the frame, yes I'll do it myself. I'm not trying for anything show quality, just something that will protect it. I saw that Eastwood has a kit with a brush on rust encapsulator and four cans of chassis black spray paint. I've also heard others that swear by POR 15. Your thoughts?

On a side note, I don't know how you find the time/energy to take on even more projects than you already have going!

View attachment 166220

View attachment 166221
My apologies 289Galaxie I spaced out on the fact you were talking about the convertible mounts.

They do not provide enough of the smaller convertible mounts in the kit? How many do you need? Just 2 sets?

166222


These are my extra mounts from the 3 kits I bought for the two '66's and '68. If you want just email me here [email protected] with your mailing address and I can drop 2 sets of the small mounts in the mail for you.

Cheers
 

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I had the dash gages rebuilt by a shop, (H&H Auto Electrical, Greer S.C.) gald I did. He tested the gages and calib them. The speedo was undated from 120 to 140 and the tach from 6K to 8K. Important thing about the tach was converting it from regular 2 wire 1968 dist to the new electronic 3 wire systems. He said if I had run it, the tach would have been fried and completely burned out. 6 year warranty too.
The other 3 I converted the pass side to oil temp gages for the engine, trans and diff. Along with cooling fan and fuel pump over ride switches.
 

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