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Discussion Starter · #81 ·
168686


168687


168688


With the drums cut these might actually work now.

168689


Ug, this front cable was a bear to change. I fought with this for about 2 hours.

168690


168691


I had to remove the splash shield and of course it's so crispified it just broke after I took the bracket off. But it was a pain getting the old cable out and tricky getting the new cable in such a tight space.

168692


I installed air shocks to try to level the car.

168693


Since the previous owner replaced the front springs and they are not the right calibration for this car with these options it rides almost 2" higher in the front and the rear is low. This at least levels the car for now. It rides pretty high at the moment, but there is nothing I can do till I am able to get the original calibrated front springs for this car. I do have them in my parts car but it's a big to do to get them out at the moment. I do wish people would see that the new springs aren't correct and put the old ones back in. In this example I can guarantee they were throwing parts at this trying to get it to drive normal when the rear bushings were at fault and it has excessive play in the steering gear. That play may be in the worm and rack and at that point you need to try another gear or locate an NOS rack and worm to replace it. It's very time consuming and expensive to properly rebuild a steering gear. There is no adjusting that play out.

The end result is now a car that is now just roadworthy. The rear end is nicely secured, aside from the differential clunk it's sorted out back there. The parking/emergency brakes work and release fully now. That's novel.

I can now use the car for now for local trips without too much worry. I can't do too much more for the suspension and steering until I get my spare front springs and have a good power steering gear candidate for a proper rebuild. Ultimately it needs a new differential, but if I'm going to do that, I will upgrade to 31 spline, Eaton True Track, nodular iron third member and Ford Explorer rear disc brakes. It doesn't make sense to just replace a 28 spline open differential with the same especially when this car will eventually received the same type of fuel injected built 390 (500+ gross horsepower) as the other two '66's received.

The transmission in this hits so damn hard going in reverse first thing cold in the morning it chirps the tyres with the brakes on. I swear it tries to shatter the Cardan joints. So that C6 needs to go. Then the engine also needs to go as it's on its last leg. Funny thing is it runs so smooth but it's burning coolant and I 9 out of the 10 intakes bolts are seized and I'd probably break every exhaust bolt as well.

It just goes to show you can't trust a seller no matter what they might seemingly convincingly say and no matter how long they've owned and how it may look aesthetically or the stack of receipts a mile high they might have on the car. It all has to be gone through and you'll probably find a lot wrong.

More to come.

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter · #82 ·
It's Always Something....

Hello all,

Well the engine in the '68 XL pretty much went Tango Uniform. I had it running quite well for the last couple weeks, by quite well, I mean if you babied it, it was fine and really behaved itself. Well 2 days ago I was out doing errands in it and a couple times I noticed when I let off the throttle coming to a stop the car would start bucking. But if you gave it throttle it revved up fine and accelerated fine <rolling eyes>. So what gives. I came home and just parked it in the usual garage spot hoping it was just a "thing" and would be ok in the morning because I don't want to deal with this right now, or really ever as this thing is getting on my nerves.

However yesterday morning it didn't get the memo and it was cold and wouldn't stay running and it was bucking like it was missing on more than one cylinder. Super-duper... I had to sit on the throttle till it warmed up and was chugging on its own. So I start the process of cylinder balance test by taking off one plug wire at a time on the cap. Well 4 and 7 are completely dead, I mean they do nothing. Just swell, one on one bank and one on the other. That's not good.

So I pull the plugs, they look like brand new. That's not good either. I grab the compression tester, unplug the ignition and test both cylinders, both are struggling to make 100 PSI cranking. Well on the whole, that's not good, but that's still enough to light off. I put the plugs back in and start it and magically it's running fine. That's not good either as a whole.

With that I did my errands yesterday, well that lasted about 10 minutes and back to chugging and stalling in gear at idle. Sure enough 4 and 7 aren't doing anything at idle. Thinking well maybe it has two bad plugs that are shorting the HV. So I grab two new platinum ones and still 4 and 7 completely dead and you can hear the spark jumping to the wire off the cap just holding it there, so they are sparking. I revved it up to about 3500 RPMS and then something bad happened. It just started making all kinds of mechanical internal noise and was shaking the car pretty vigorously. I let off the throttle and it just dies, start it with gas and it just dies. Great….

I get the timing light out and in cranking the base timing magically jumped to over 30 BTC. That distributor was tight so it didn't move. Now I'm really scratching my head. I move it back down to 12 BTC and it starts and idles but still nothing on 4 and 7, if I rev it up there's really loud noised out of the rocker covers.

That's it, stick a fork in it, it's done. I can't explain the sudden shift in base timing. But I can hypothesize that the camshaft ate at least 2 lobes and maybe some of the metal ended up in the oil pump and the load sheared the pin on the dizzy gear and moved the timing. I bet if I cut open the oil filter I will find at least 5 kinds of unhappiness in there.

I remember the seller saying he changed the oil before we bought it, I wonder if he didn't add ZDDP and with a high mileage camshaft, the lack of those lubricants just finished it off. Now the race is on to make the Z-code 390 out of the pile 68 LTD work once more. I ordered all the stuff for it, sans the valves.

Has anyone noticed the shortage of engine parts???

I had to order from 5 different places to get all the parts. It's pretty bad when you have to scavenge off of E-Bay and Amazon for parts. For just a stock rebuild I had to order from Summit, Rock Auto, Fleece Bay, Amazon, and Cylinder Head Supply. That's nuts….. just nuts…

By stupid chance I timed the dissection of the 68 LTD parts car pretty well. I was thinking about using its C6 as well, but I noticed it's not the original transmission to the car.


48729



It has a small leak, and by small leak I mean like Han Solo having a slight weapons malfunction in the rescue scene at the Death Star.


48730



The pan didn't look to horrible on the inside.


48731



There's a C6 in there somewhere I'm sure of it.


48732



Found it.


48733



The serial doesn't match the serial of the car, but can anyone confirm the 8 Z means it's a 68 and mated to a Z code engine? I am not sure of the codes stamped.


48734



Since I have no idea what this came out of, I have no idea of what the valve body calibration is, so I'll just keep this as a spare for now and will do the other spare C6.

Continued in next post.
 

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Discussion Starter · #83 ·
It's Always Something.... Continued.


48735



Here's the new engine candidate. The serial on this engine does match the serial on the VIN so it's the original Z-code 390.


48736



For an 50+ year old abandoned car, it doesn't look too bad. Well so far.


48737



I knew it bent a pushrod and a lifter vomited its guts out a year ago and it was running on 7 cylinders.

48738



The cylinders do not look too bad. There's a little lip on the edge. Still have to check taper.

48739



This side is ok too.

48740



Oh wow the original timing chain and there's not much wiggle in the chain. I am surprised. I'm starting to think the odometer is correct at 71K miles and has not rolled.

48741



Some of the lifters are pitted and that's normal for a car sitting outside unsheltered for god knows how many decades without being run.

48742



The camshaft seems original as well, although there are no numbers on it. Just FoMoCo.

48744



Here's a good reason to stay atop of coolant changes, the rear cylinders are nearly filled with goo.

48745



The engine ran most of its life in the leaded fuel era as the bottom of the oil pan still has about 1/8" of a gray lead slurry and there's lead slurry on most of the other parts.

The plan is to just give this engine a back yard refresh to last 40-50K miles reliably in the XL, until I can get a proper 390 built. With the lack of parts (part manufacturers moving out of commifornia to other states) it will take quite some time for the parts chain to re-emerge. That added to I can't seem to find a trusted machine shop locally, I'll try and do it all at home as long as it doesn't need a cylinder bore.

The heads however need new valve guides and I will try that at home. One thing I did learn, the hard way is never run an engine that's been sitting without disassembling, cleaning, lubing and putting it back together. This engine had old hardened oil in the valve guide and when I ran this, it had virtually no lubricity and it ate the valve stems and valve guides.

Sure it's fun to get something old and neglected running but it's an expensive experience, especially if you want to use that engine later on. I know there's all kinds of automotive resurrection videos and they can be fun to watch, but keep in mind the damage that is being done.

The only reason why I bought this '68 LTD was for its frame, at the time I didn't care about the drive-train and just got it running for 3 years. Well now that I need the engine, I just shot myself in the foot and have to replace the valves and guides as a result. Let it be a lesson.

More to come.
 

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It's Always Something....

...............
The serial doesn't match the serial of the car, but can anyone confirm the 8 Z means it's a 68 and mated to a Z code engine? I am not sure of the codes stamped.
.......................
Since I have no idea what this came out of, I have no idea of what the valve body calibration is, so I'll just keep this as a spare for now and will do the other spare C6.

Continued in next post.
What are the codes on the tag attached to the servo?
I can probably decode that for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #85 ·
What are the codes on the tag attached to the servo?
I can probably decode that for you.
Hello galaxiex,

Thank you if you don't mind I'll take you up on that offer, if anything for my own or others edification. I'll obtain the information tomorrow.

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter · #86 ·
DIY Valve Job at Home

I would be remiss if I didn't state I had my reservations about doing this at home without a proper guide/seat machine. This challenged me to think pretty far out of the box to pull this off. With that out of the way, here's the story.

168953



This is one of the nasty heads off that Z390.

168954


This engine still has the lead deposits on the valves.

168955


You can see the lead filled in the recess in the valve. I've had this with another FE and it would detonate like mad on modern fuel with this lead buildup that acts like a glow plug after a few minutes of running. There's no fuel additive like Berrymans B12 or Seafoam that will clean the lead off. The only way is to aggressively physically remove the deposits.

Since the vast majority of the guides were worn, they all needed to be replaced. I watched a few videos of machine shops performing guide replacement to get a sense of what's involved. Now for those unfamiliar with that process, the guide/seat machine floats the head then a round rod (basically a valve stem) is lowered from a mill type feed into the old head guide hole and this locates the head. The head is then locked into position and the round guide rod exchanged for the drill/reamer, then the old guide in the head is drilled and reamed oversize for a new false guide insert. Once that's drilled and cleaned an air hammer is used to install the guide into the head into the required depth. this is performed all from the top of the head.

In thinking about this I needed a way to centre the drill bit with respect to the seat and keep the bit at the 13˚ angle of which the FE valve train is located. All I have is a mill and lathe. After giving it some thought I came up with a plausible way to do this. First I needed the drill/reamer. This was pricy at 200 dollars shipped.



168956


It's actually 3 in one. The top is the pilot, the next small section is the drill and the rest of the shank is the reamer. This makes a 0.500" bore hole in the existing guide hole. The false guide inserts are 0.502" so the 0.002" is the interference fit that holds them in place.

Next I made my own drill bit seat guides out of 6061-T6 aluminum on the lathe. I made one for the intake seat and one for the smaller exhaust seat.

168957


This is the intake guide piece I made.

168958


I whacked it out of this large chunk of aluminum.

168959


I will be drilling from this side like so. With the head flipped up-side-down the machined rocker arm side keeps the original guide holes perpendicular.

168960


This is how it will work in the mill. Since my guide locates the drill I can leave the head float on the mill table and just press down on my aluminum guide as I drill.

168961


This is the setup.

168962


Continued in next post.
 

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Discussion Starter · #87 ·
DIY Valve Job at Home Continued

168963


This is the exhaust drill bit locator. As you guessed it mimics the valve. The face on my aluminum locator is cut at 45˚ to match the valve face.

168964


Now because I had the head on my mill table there wasn't enough room to finish the bore on the guide. I aligned the table on the mill to the pilot portion of the drill went into the 'T' slot on the table, but I had to finish the boring of each guide with a cordless drill on the bench. There was about 1/2" left to go, the majority of the reamer was already into the guide hole on the mill so it's pretty locked into place where drilling by hand wouldn't affect the results with careful attention.

168965


To install the guides I took a generic (Walmart) air hammer bit set and ended up making a square shoulder on it to drive the guide insert into the head.

168966


You can see the shoulder in the bit above. After drilling I cleaned the holes, lubed them and installed the first guide. But then I had a problem. Because of the core shift in the head, the guide holes are not centre'd with the bosses sticking up and it cracked the side of a boss. So I chased that crack with a dremel and carbide bit so it wouldn't spread, then for the rest I opened up that boss protrusion in the head some with a porting kit so it wouldn't crack due to the thin wall when the false guide was pressed in with the air hammer.

168967


I filed the tops of the guides to match the rest of the machined top surface.

168968


I had one brand new intake valve on hand so I used that as my guinea pig to test the guides. They all feel very good. No binding and not loose like the old ones.

168969


I was curious how well my system worked, so I used that new valve to see how well it would lap to the seat. It took little effort for a smooth concentric lap. So my guide installation is right on the mark.

168970


I did notice three oversized stem valves in these heads. Only these valves have the "FORD" logo on them. Was this a factory mistake, or was it worked on sometime long ago. Dunno. This is the first time I've seen oversized valve stems.

Whilst I was waiting for the new valves to arrive I wanted to install oil restrictors to the rockers. I've seen people use carburetor jets but they move about in the head and I wanted something fixed.

The oil passage in the head is 5/16" so this lends to just using 3/8"-16 tap.

168971


168972



That's just a 3/8"-16 allen set screw with a hole in it.

Continued in next post.
 

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Discussion Starter · #88 ·
DIY Valve Job at Home Continued

168973


That was simply from a cheap set from Harbor Freight.

168974


168975


This is what I used to drill the hole through them.

168976


I've read that a #70 - #90 jet size works well. The drill bit I had works out to be a #76 equivalent jet size.



I also broke exhaust bolts off in the heads taking the manifolds off. Here's a little trick that seems to work fairly well most times.

168977


168978


For a 3/8" bolt I use a 1/2" nut and it's placed like this and then welded to the bit of bolt. Now if you're going to use a zinc plated or cadmium plated bolt make damn sure you have ventilation and the smoke is blowing away from you. It's toxic.

168979


The idea once welded, let the temperature equalize between the hot bolt/nut and the head, then squirt the bolt with penetrating oil and use a wrench on the nut. Two of the bolts came out right quick, the third fought me for quite some time.

168980


I cleaned the mating surfaces of the heads. Now to clean these because they were so bad required a lot of work and processes. First was a scrubbing in the parts tank, then a quick wash with brake clean outside. Then into the electrolysis tank overnight to get the rust out of the cooling passages, then into the walnut blasting cabinet. They are clean, inside and out.

168981


For old junk and DIY they are showing promise.

168982


The new valves, springs and retainers came in.

Continued in next post.
 

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Discussion Starter · #89 ·
DIY Valve Job at Home Continued

168983


I spot checked the valve stems in few locations for tolerance and these are looking good.

168984


This is after a quick lapping and the head seats and valve faces look really good.

168985


New valve stem seals.

168986


New springs.

168987


168988


This head is done.

168989


Second head. Again the valve seat interface is looking very good.

168990


168991


168992


Both heads are done sans paint. These should work really well. Out of pocket cost (including the drill/reamer) was 400 dollars. Not bad for DIY.

Now lets see what I can do with that block.

Continued in next post.
 

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Discussion Starter · #90 ·
Engine Block


48836



Everything is removed at this point except the oil plugs.


48837



So far I don't see any deal breakers. I can polish the crank out here. I bought new rings, cam, main and rod bearings for it.

Now to get the oil plugs out, I found a really neat video on this and after trying it, it really works well so I wanted to share.


48838



It's really simple, drill the oil welch plug with an 1/8" drill bit, screw in a long sheet metal screw in a ways and use the claw hammer to pull the screw out. The plug comes right out, rather alarmingly easily I might add. Rinse and repeat.


48839




48840




48841




48842



To remove the dribbler plug in front and the plug recessed in the distributor well, remove the rear plugs first then drive a rod from the back side and lightly tap, they pop right out. Done diddly done. :)

Now I am just waiting for a day when the wind isn't blowing 40+ MPH and I will pressure wash the block.

More to come.

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter · #91 ·
What are the codes on the tag attached to the servo?
I can probably decode that for you.
Hello galaxiex,

I'm sorry for the delay, but would you still mind decoding the tag off this C6 please?

Thank you

169008


169009


It would be interesting to know more about this transmission.

Cheers
 

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Howdy DesertXL

The code PGB decodes as a 1967 C6 (you knew that) Column shift exc, P/C and Fleet. ostensibly used behind a 428 engine.

The A2 is a change level code.
I don't have specific info on the changes.

The numbers 017748 do not appear in the information I have at hand, but would appear to be the serial number.

Looks like it has a "G" code servo, which is rather small in the scheme of C6 servos.

Apply Diameter 2.04"
Release Diameter 3.02"
This would be the aluminum piston type that uses "O" rings, rather than the later molded piston type.

My other manual is at my workplace, and may have (probably has) more info.
I will look it up tomorrow when I go to work.

Cheers!
 

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Discussion Starter · #93 ·
Howdy DesertXL

The code PGB decodes as a 1967 C6 (you knew that) Column shift exc, P/C and Fleet. ostensibly used behind a 428 engine.

The A2 is a change level code.
I don't have specific info on the changes.

The numbers 017748 do not appear in the information I have at hand, but would appear to be the serial number.

Looks like it has a "G" code servo, which is rather small in the scheme of C6 servos.

Apply Diameter 2.04"
Release Diameter 3.02"
This would be the aluminum piston type that uses "O" rings, rather than the later molded piston type.

My other manual is at my workplace, and may have (probably has) more info.
I will look it up tomorrow when I go to work.

Cheers!
Thank you galaxiex,

That's interesting. I wonder if "Mr. Horsepower" actually that was the sticker in the back window of the car this came out of, killed the original C6 and found this one instead, since the VIN serial does not match the engine nor body VIN.

Do you by chance have a listing that shows the calibration code on the actual valve body and what that translates to as far as internal parts used?

Cheers
 

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Hi DesertXL,

My mistake earlier...
The letters PGB A2 is the full trans model designation.
It does decode as a 1968 Ford column shift 428 engine, so I was correct about that. (wrong about the year) also used in Mercury w/428 that year.
The area that would show a change level is blank on that tag, so I was incorrect about the A2 being the change level.
If there was a change level it would be stamped after the A2 on the same line.

017748 is certainly the trans serial number.
I don't know if it would correlate in any way to the VIN.

There are 2 other PGB A coded versions used in 1967 Mercury full size that have floor shift and 410 or 428 engine and dual exhaust.
And yet another PGB A in a 1967 Ford full size with 428 and column shift.

Sorry, I do not have valve body tag information, though I did have it a one time.....
I seem to have lost track of it... :(
 

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I think the "z" in the vin number stamped in the top of the casing is from a vehicle assembled a St Louis (according to Wikipedia's list of closed for assembly plants) - not to do with the 'Z' engine code...

Great work on the heads by the way...
 

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Discussion Starter · #96 ·
Hi DesertXL,

My mistake earlier...
The letters PGB A2 is the full trans model designation.
It does decode as a 1968 Ford column shift 428 engine, so I was correct about that. (wrong about the year) also used in Mercury w/428 that year.
The area that would show a change level is blank on that tag, so I was incorrect about the A2 being the change level.
If there was a change level it would be stamped after the A2 on the same line.

017748 is certainly the trans serial number.
I don't know if it would correlate in any way to the VIN.

There are 2 other PGB A coded versions used in 1967 Mercury full size that have floor shift and 410 or 428 engine and dual exhaust.
And yet another PGB A in a 1967 Ford full size with 428 and column shift.

Sorry, I do not have valve body tag information, though I did have it a one time.....
I seem to have lost track of it... :(
Hi galaxiex,

I do wish to thank you ever so kindly for taking the time to decode this. No worries on the valve body calibration codes, just thought I'd ask. It'll be interesting to see what is inside this being that it was behind a larger displacement engine. I do plan on putting in new seals and bushings (cheap as chips) as it leaks like a sieve when full. Even though this is a spare C6, I would like to keep it full of fluid and to the point of nonleaking and operational as we intend to keep two complete parts cars and I would like to have them be able to move under their own power. So a little bit later on this will be coming apart, cleaned, new seals and bushings installed, then it along with a refurbished correct length propshaft (C6 vs original FX) can go in the spare 1966 galaxie 500.

Cheers
 

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Hi galaxiex,

I do wish to thank you ever so kindly for taking the time to decode this. No worries on the valve body calibration codes, just thought I'd ask. It'll be interesting to see what is inside this being that it was behind a larger displacement engine. I do plan on putting in new seals and bushings (cheap as chips) as it leaks like a sieve when full. Even though this is a spare C6, I would like to keep it full of fluid and to the point of nonleaking and operational as we intend to keep two complete parts cars and I would like to have them be able to move under their own power. So a little bit later on this will be coming apart, cleaned, new seals and bushings installed, then it along with a refurbished correct length propshaft (C6 vs original FX) can go in the spare 1966 galaxie 500.

Cheers
You are very welcome.

I'm curious as well about the internals, since it is coded for a 428.
I'm gonna guess that it won't be much different from a "regular" 390 C6.
Probably 4 frictions in the FWD pack.
Likely 3 frictions in the Hi/Rev pack, I'll be surprised if there are 4.
Low/Rev will probably have 4 or 5 frictions.

Interestingly... years ago I rebuilt a C6 from a Thunderbird.
I don't recall the year of the car, (I want to say it was a 66) or the engine size (may have been a 352) but I do remember it was an FE.
I was shocked to find a mere 2 frictions in the Hi/Rev drum.
All C6's I had rebuilt up to that point always had 3 or more frictions in that drum.
The snap ring groove was very low in the drum and was definitely made that way from the factory.
It did not have a snap ring groove higher up to allow any additional frictions to be installed.
I also recall the trans had never been worked on before. (there are tell-tales signs when someone has been in it already)
I remember swapping in a 3 friction drum, just as a little insurance. ;)

Cheers!
 

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Discussion Starter · #98 ·
I think the "z" in the vin number stamped in the top of the casing is from a vehicle assembled a St Louis (according to Wikipedia's list of closed for assembly plants) - not to do with the 'Z' engine code...

Great work on the heads by the way...
Hello Jiffy,

You are probably correct. I had a blonde moment and forgot I do have a 1968 C6 that is the original to a XL fastback as the serial number stamped on the case matches. It does start with an 8 P. The 8 must be the year and the P has to be a factory as it's clearly not an engine designation.

Thank you for the kind sentiments on the heads. I have never done anything like that before and it was an interesting experience.

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter · #99 ·
Frames and misc.

This holiday weekend my better half and I switched a frame on a parts car. Basically we know how to party :)

There's a couple reasons for this, first I wanted to keep a good '68 frame and I needed the front springs off of my other XL fastback.


48901



This is one primary reason why these 3rd gen frames love to corrode from the inside out. This is all the junk from INSIDE the frame. Add salty winters and you won't have a frame without a thorough cleaning and metal protection from the inside and obviously the outside.


48902



3000 PSI gasoline powered pressure washer did a pretty good job cleaning the debris from the inside out. This is the donor frame from a 1968 LTD 4 door hardtop that's been sitting around for a few years. This car has donated quite a bit of parts for the other 3rd gens besides its frame, which is the only reason why I originally bought it. A 500 dollar parts car can go a long long way.


48903



This is the rusted frame from my XL fastback. I need the front springs for the other XL fastback as these are the correct calibrated springs for this car with these options. Both XL fastbacks have the same major options affecting spring selection (FE, air con, PS).


48904



The lower outer rails need to be replaced. This frame is not beyond redemption by any means, but since I have a better one, why bother.


48905



Same on the other side. Aside from the lower outer rails, the rest of the frame internally is in good shape.
I've repaired one of these frames already, it's an all day job, been there and done that and have no wish to do it again.


48906



Like I said this is a common thing with these frames and this is a better rusted frame (this is the frame on my '66 LTD)


48907




48910




48908




48909



It's a lot of tedious work, but in the end you can have a good frame and coat a good portion of the outer rails from the inside out this way. Then finish the frame with internal frame coating for the rest of it.

Continued in next post.
 

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Discussion Starter · #100 ·
Frames and misc. continued


48911



Putting this back together.


48912



Done with old rsuted frame underneath. Now I can disassemble the old frame and get the parts I need. The differential feels a lot less worn (jockeying the yoke) than the other XL, so this is a good donating candidate for now to fix that.




48913




48914



Funny how this car sits lower in the back than the 4 door hardtop LTD body did. I would have thought the 4 door hardtop would have been heavier.


48915



I wonder if the bucket seat/centre console option for the '68 XL are heavier than the standard bench seat? Interesting.


48916



I thought it would be more like this, with its butt higher in the air with the LTD's higher load rated springs.



48917



Back to the Z390 engine. This was the before.



48918



It came out pretty good for "DIY home services" :)



48919





48920



The sheer amount of crap in the cooling jackets was something to behold. Now the core plugs were rusted and one was leaking badly for years but fortunately I kept adding actual antifreeze and not just water, especially tap water, granted it was getting ridiculous adding a gallon every time I needed to move it but that kept the cast iron internals from rusting. It looks really clean on the inside with hardly any rust.

I finished drilling and tapping the oil galleys and just have to give it one more good cleaning and it's ready for assembly.

More to come.

Cheers
 
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