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I just love this stuff! You are truly awe-inspiring. I do have a question for you about those inner fender lower splash skirts/aprons. Have you found a source for those, or will you have to make a replacement? I'm going through the body on my '65 convertible and mine are very deteriorated. I don't feel like I've seen these in the catalogs. Just wondered how you would tackle this. (Sorry it's not completely topical to what you're working on at the moment). Thank you for sharing all your detailed information and expertise!
 

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Discussion Starter · #102 ·
I just love this stuff! You are truly awe-inspiring. I do have a question for you about those inner fender lower splash skirts/aprons. Have you found a source for those, or will you have to make a replacement? I'm going through the body on my '65 convertible and mine are very deteriorated. I don't feel like I've seen these in the catalogs. Just wondered how you would tackle this. (Sorry it's not completely topical to what you're working on at the moment). Thank you for sharing all your detailed information and expertise!
Hello Jazzmeister,

That is very gracious of you for the kind comments. On the lower splash shield, I did buy new ones for the '66. That was a while back and honestly I can't remember where I got them. I do know all my weather strip components came from 1 of 3 places; Dennis Carpenter (now I guess it's called Daniel Carpenter), Macs, and Obsolete Auto. I would try one of those. You do have to re-use the steel banding on yours, it doesn't come with it, so make sure you keep both sides pieces. If you can't find it let me know and I'll did through a massive pile of receipts to see where I bought it from.

Cheers
 

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Hello Jazzmeister,

That is very gracious of you for the kind comments. On the lower splash shield, I did buy new ones for the '66. That was a while back and honestly I can't remember where I got them. I do know all my weather strip components came from 1 of 3 places; Dennis Carpenter (now I guess it's called Daniel Carpenter), Macs, and Obsolete Auto. I would try one of those. You do have to re-use the steel banding on yours, it doesn't come with it, so make sure you keep both sides pieces. If you can't find it let me know and I'll did through a massive pile of receipts to see where I bought it from.

Cheers
Thank you. I'll have to look through those catalogs again. I'm still waiting for a print copy of the Carpenter catalog, but I'm guessing that's my best bet. They seem to have the most unique and hard-to-find stuff for these. I did remove my old ones and save them just in case, but I'm pretty sure they didn't have any banding. It's was just stapled into the sheet metal through the rubber. The rubber is frayed and has internal braiding/banding like tire material, but no retainer of any sort other than the staples. I appreciate the info, and here's hoping I can find some!
 

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Jazzmeister,

I'm pretty sure this is what you're looking for: Front Fender Apron Seal

I replaced them on my '67 (different part number) and they came with new staples only. As DesertXL said, you do have to reuse the existing metal retainer.

Just found this picture of the seal I believe you're looking for that I had taken a while ago.

Regarding the print copy of the Dennis Carpenter catalog, I requested one over a month ago and never got it.

DesertXL, sorry about the hijack just trying to help.

9742FA39-402F-430E-AEF1-086472CDB38B.jpeg
 

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Jazzmeister,

I'm pretty sure this is what you're looking for: Front Fender Apron Seal

I replaced them on my '67 (different part number) and they came with new staples only. As DesertXL said, you do have to reuse the existing metal retainer.

Just found this picture of the seal I believe you're looking for that I had taken a while ago.

Regarding the print copy of the Dennis Carpenter catalog, I requested one over a month ago and never got it.

DesertXL, sorry about the hijack just trying to help.

View attachment 169060
Thank you, that looks like the part, but mine never appeared to have the bolt retainer...no holes were in the sheet metal or the original apron. I wonder if this was a running change? Anyway, hopefully my parts car will provide. Thanks for the link...just what I needed!
 

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Discussion Starter · #106 ·
Jazzmeister,

I'm pretty sure this is what you're looking for: Front Fender Apron Seal

I replaced them on my '67 (different part number) and they came with new staples only. As DesertXL said, you do have to reuse the existing metal retainer.

Just found this picture of the seal I believe you're looking for that I had taken a while ago.

Regarding the print copy of the Dennis Carpenter catalog, I requested one over a month ago and never got it.

DesertXL, sorry about the hijack just trying to help.

View attachment 169060
Howdy 289Galaxie,

No worries, but that's a 67-68 splash shield, the '65-'66 splash shield tis a bit different. I'll snap a picture of the ones I installed tomorrow.

Cheers
 

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Howdy 289Galaxie,

No worries, but that's a 67-68 splash shield, the '65-'66 splash shield tis a bit different. I'll snap a picture of the ones I installed tomorrow.

Cheers
Thanks DesertXL. I knew they were different but didn't know exactly what that difference was. That's why I provided a link for the 65-66 but also mentioned that the '67 was a different part number.

Now I'm curious to know what the 65-66 actually looks like and how it's installed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #108 ·
Thanks DesertXL. I knew they were different but didn't know exactly what that difference was. That's why I provided a link for the 65-66 but also mentioned that the '67 was a different part number.

Now I'm curious to know what the 65-66 actually looks like and how it's installed.
Hello 289Galaxie and Jazzmeister,

Here's the '65-'66 apron splash shield.

169075


That little triangle wedge with the apron bolt going through it needs to be reused. That fold over triangle captures that end of the splash shield with 3 staples. The kit came with new staples and plastic push retainers.

Hope that helps.

Jazzmeister did you find the splash shields yets?

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter · #109 ·
1966 Frame vs 1968 Frame

It isn't everyday that a photo comparison of two 3rd gen frames is possible. But since I was going to dispose of the 1968 frame with rust holes I had a chance to roll out the completed '66 chassis for a visual comparison to those whom might be interested.

Just to recap on the 3 classes of 3rd gen frames there are:

1.) Station wagon frames
2.) Convertible frames
3.) All others (same for 2 or 4 door, post or no post)

All our 3rd gens fall into #3 category.

48950



Here's the 1968 frame.


48951



The 1966 chassis.

The frames are interchangeable with minor work. The critical mounting areas are the same for each, there's just a few differences. There is one caveat, the 1965 frame uses different locations for the pan-hard/track-bar location on the axle.


48952



The upper cross member on the '68 is different. Ford changed this to use larger bushings in the rear upper control arm and judging from the construction it is much easier and cheaper to make than the '65-66.


48953



There's a pocket on the '65/'66 chassis for the upper rear control arm. You can use a '65/'66 rear upper control arm on a '67/'68 frame but not the reverse.


48954



That's the difference for the rear section. Now for the middle section.


48955



On the '65/'66 frames the parking brake cables run in the centre like a 'V' the front cable comes from the front of the body and runs right to the transmission cross member.


48956



The cables pass through holes in the rear torque box/control arm attachments and then to each wheel. The rear left and right cables are the same.


48957



I don't have the cables in the '67/'68 frame, you'll have to use your imagination, but both rear cables run over to the drivers side rear torque box/control arm mount where then the front cable runs along from the drivers side front torque box to the rear with an equalizer/adjusting bar. The rear left and right cables are different as one is much longer for the passenger side wheel.


48958



This is the drivers side front torque box and the front parking brake cable runs right through it. It enters the front side and exits here in the back.


48959



The front parking brake cable comes out of the body and runs immediately into the front torque box. This is a MAJOR pain to change with the front wheel apron on the car.

Continued in next post.
 

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Discussion Starter · #110 ·
1966 Frame vs 1968 Frame Continued

48960




There is no provision in the '65/'66 front torque box for the front parking brake cable since it runs over and to the transmission cross brace.


48961



No exit hole either.


48962



And that's it, everything forward of the front torque boxes is exactly the same. That's why 1968 front disc brakes will bolt on directly to any 1965-1968 car with drums. Obviously you have to use the spindle from the disc brake car, but there are zero alignment problems (bump steer, caster or camber) as you might have with using spindles and disc brakes from another model.


48963



This 1966 chassis has 1968 front discs on it.


48964



So just how bad was the rust on this frame?.... Actually not bad at all.


48965



It was only limited to about 12" of lower frame, the rest of the frame was in really good condition. I hated to get rid of it, but I already have 3 spare frames and no room.


48966




48967



This yielded many good parts including another spare set of front disc brakes. Most importantly I have the correct front coil springs for the '68 golden XL now, with these I can get the normal ride height back and do a proper alignment.


48968



The heavy duty (large bearing) 9" is in really good shape. The future plan will be to clean, paint and refresh this axle and then just swap the whole thing into the golden XL as that is really worn.

More to come.

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter · #111 ·
Short Block Assembly

Hello again,

A little more progress on the DIY refresh Z390 engine. At this point the block has been cleaned out and is ready for parts.


48992



Here are the new cam bearings. For those not familiar, each cam bearing is a different size allowing the smallest to go in first as it populates from the rear to the front.


48993



The front cam bearing for the FE is easy to spot as it has two oil through holes. It's important to install this one or clock it properly to allow lube oil for the distributor shaft otherwise it could seize in the block.


48994



The new bearing set has different part numbers for the different locations, the original ones are stamped; 1,2,3, etc

I am using Clevite tri-metal bearings.


48995



You really need the correct installer tool to reduce the risk of bearing damage. This is the Lisle version.


48996




48997



The tapered side of the bearing goes points towards the rear of the block. Now for clocking these. Ford puts the oil hole at 3 O'Clock. Every original FE I've dismantled are at 3 so far. It shouldn't matter on the 4 rearward bearings where the hole is at, but I had a think about why 3 O'Clock position. Here's what I came up with, assume the cam bearing surfaces are really ridiculous worn for better illustration purposes. The valve train will push the cam straight down when the camshaft isn't turning, this is from the valve springs and seems logical. However with the engine running since the crankshaft spins clockwise and withcidentally so the camshaft, the worn camshaft will want to walk up the right side of the cam bearing from the friction of the oil and cam bearing surfaces. The faster it spins the more it will walk up. And what's on the right side, the oil hole.

Keep in mind the crankshaft mains and rods get their lube oil from around the cam bearings. If the cam bearings are hemorrhaging oil from worn bearings and or camshaft, that lowers the available pressure at the crankshaft and the lower end suffers.


48998



To keep track where the cam bearing oil hole I use a mark on the installer tool.


48999



It's easy to overshoot installing the bearings so little taps and check progress. It's a pain the butt to push them back the other way.


49000



For the front cam bearings I use the generic installation tool since it's right in front.


49001



Make sure sure the openings in the bearing align with the oil feed holes in the block. If not Mr. Distributor suffers. :(

Continued in next post.
 

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Discussion Starter · #112 ·
Short Block Assembly Continued


49002




You want the front cam bearing recessed a bit to alleviate any possibility of interference with the cam retainer plate.



49003



No frills camshaft, just a stock Z390 flat tappet model.


49004



Huh, made in the U.S.A. I'm surprised..... Must be old stock :)


49005



The usual instructions for breaking in a camshaft, nothing new on this page, but......


49006



Some of you guys still running flat tappet cams might find this interesting. It's a study of common 3 oils and the levels of additives necessary for flat tappet cam survival.


49007



Next is fitting the camshaft to the bearings. It's lightly lubed and inserted for an initial impression of fitment. This one fit really nicely from the start.


49008



This is how I check for bearing high spots. I take a green Scotchbrite pad and lightly scuff the bearings, once all the bearings have a dull homogenous finish I'll reinsert the cam and spin it by hand, then remove it. Any intense shiny spots on the bearings are dressed down with more Scotchbrite action. Rinse and repeat till none are found. Only the rear two bearings had two small spots that needed dressing otherwise there is cam happiness so far.

Now before the cam is installed for the last time, it's best to install the rear cam plug.


49009



And here's where the aftermarket strikes again, aka more :poop:

When I first took apart the engine and saw the amount of crud in the cooling jackets I feared the core plug bores would be pitted so I found a Melling FE deep plug kit thinking ok more surface area. However 1-3/4" is the wrong size core plug for the FE. It's 1-49/64's.

As much as I detest Dorman, they get it right on this (credit where credit is due).


49010



Melling plug


49011



Dorman plug.

It isn't much, but it could very well be the difference between pulling the bloody engine out again because of a leaking core plug or one that just popped out. And anyone with a fully loaded car with an FE knows it's a pain in the butt.

Continued in the next post
 

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Discussion Starter · #113 ·
Short Block Assembly Continued

The Melling kit unfortunately doesn't end there with incorrect parts.


49012



The cam plug on the right side is the Melling and the Dorman plug on the left. The Melling plug is too deep. The Dorman plug is the correct depth.


49013



The one thing I do like from the Melling kit are the 1/4" NPT pipe plugs, they are a wee bit shorter than the Dorman ones and this comes in handy for a few places.


49014



Mixing sets together this is what I need for this block. For a someone whose new to old cars, stuff like this would drive them crazy.


49015



Parts for the rear of the block. I took it off the stand and it's face down on a pad. I had previously drilled and tapped the rear oil holes for 1/4" NPT plugs.


49016



All the parts had a light coating of Ultra Black RTV when installed. I use an old bushing can to install the cam plug, this one is the perfect size.


49017




49018



The Melling cam plug would sit to high and interfere with the starter locating plate (what some call the block spacer plate).


49019



Same treatment for the core plugs.


49020



The two front plugs. Now the top plug was originally a dribbler for the cam sprocket and chain. I just drilled a hole in the centre of the plug to spray oil. I'm using a HV oil pump so I've got some wiggle room on oil distribution.


49021



Drilling the top plug.

Continued in next post.
 

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Discussion Starter · #114 ·
Short Block Assembly Continued

49022





49023



This plug takes some careful planning for thread depth so the plug doesn't end up in the lifter bore.


49024



Nor is the plug so long it sticks into the distributor bore.


49025



Rest of the oil plugs installed.


49026



Now the camshaft can be installed.


49027



You don't need to use the original 'C' spacer as they are moulded on the new sprockets.


49028



Been down this road with Melling double roller timing sets before. The pin hole bored into the sprocket is too small by at least 0.002" You'll end up murdering the pin if you try to install it. Sad part is it's a Melling timing set with a Melling camshaft and the cam comes with a new pin and it doesn't fit.

Melling you need to get it together!


49029



I have to lightly polish the pin hole till it just takes light taps of a hammer to install as I do not have a reamer for this size nor should I need one.


49030



I used Locktite on the cam plate retainer bolts and used assembly lube. The cam sprocket bolt is just hand tightened for now.


49031



Next up is the crankshaft and polishing it.

Continued in next post.
 

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Discussion Starter · #115 ·
Short Block Assembly Continued

49032



I broke all the high tech tools for this. :)

You can use a flat shoelace as well, but I just cut the hem out of towel and used that and then a terry cloth. I used 600, 1500 and then some metal polish. Now this is overkill, but I'm playing devils advocate polishing at home. Since there is scoring on the crank, there is a possibility that as the valley was carved in the cranked it also pushed up a ridge. All I want to use is to remove any obtrusive high spots and bring a more uniform finish and remove any lateral scratches if possible by removing the least amount of metal from the crankshaft. Light concentric grooves are ok.

I've included the Clevite crank polishing guidelines for those who like to read more in depth details. Clevite only requires a minimum of 15 micro inches of Ra for regular engines and 10 for more high output engines.

A rough conversion to sand paper grit:

49034



So really a minimum of 240 grit wet sanded journals are needed. However that's pretty aggressive and I would prefer to remove the least amount of metal. I chose the 600 to start with then 1500 then metal polish. Why polish? I like shiny things, no other reason :)

I used WD40 as the lube for wet sanding the journals and brake cleaner to clean the sand paper periodically.

49035



For what this is, it turned out half way decent.

49036



New bearings as the old ones were just hammered from detonation and so were the pistons for that fact.

49037



The usual plastigauge test.

49038



I copy the service manual for easy access to torque data and if I get it dirty I just toss it.

49039



Mains clearance.

49040



This and the next picture are the extrema of measurements of the mains.

49041



They are all in tolerance.

Continued in next post.











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Discussion Starter · #116 ·
Short Block Assembly Continued

49042




Aftermarket headache part 2.

I've used these Fel Pro FE rear main kits before and never had a problem. Well till now.


49043



The old seals were rope and fiber side seals.

Now the Fel Pro kit crank rubber seals were correct, but I couldn't get the side seals in to save my life. This drove me nuts, it's like the side seals were 20% too big. Ever have one of those moments where you beat yourself up thinking what on earth am I doing wrong?!?!?

I even pulled out another bare block Y390 with the rear main cap and looked thinking maybe this Z390 is different for some insane reason, but no, it's not. The Fel Pro kit is.


49044



I get another identical kit and looky looky the side seals are about 20% smaller and correct. I just about lost my mind on this one.

I think BS prefix stands for Bull :poop:.


49045



2 hours later.

Spins nice and smooth.


49046



Installed the timing set and used locktite on the cam bolt. Now this timing set has a tight chain. I used the same set on the Y390 in the XL a short while back and there was still slack in the chain. Seeing this I am willing to bet the cam and or cam bearings are so worn the cam is sitting lower in the block. I think it's situations like this Ford clocks the oil holes in the cam bearings at 3 O'Clock.


49047




49048



Spins very nicely. So far so good.


49049



Time to deal with 8 of these nasty pieces. Now these are Z390 pistons and can be indentified with 390 and 4V casted into the side of the piston.


49050



The Y390 has 390 and 2V casted into it (left side). OK so what's the difference.


49051



The Y390 has a small guppy pond in the middle of it for lower compression and lower expectations.

Continued in the next post.
 

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Discussion Starter · #117 ·
Short Block Assembly Continued

49052




New rings, this along with the double roller timing set were the only upgrades to this Z390. Rock Auto just happened to have a clearance on these Moly rings.... so why not.


49053



Checking the ring gaps per instructions.


49054



Using the piston to square up the ring in the bore.


49055



I set the feeler gauge to a couple thousandths more than the minimum limit and just used it a go-no-go gauge.


49056



So I took apart each piston assembly, degreased, walnut blasted, then scraped the carbon out of the ring lands, then did a final rinse. This was tedious.


49057



New rod bearings.


49058




49059



Dry bearing clearance.


49060



Well within limits.


49061



Takes about 45 minutes per piston for all that. Only 7 more to go.

Continued in next post.
 

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Discussion Starter · #118 ·
Short Block Assembly Continued

49062




All the connecting rod bearings are hammered like this. This is the 2nd FE I'd had with lead on the valves and it was a detonation monster. I'd wager a large sum the Y390 currently in the golden XL is the same way, so that would make 3.


49063



So far so good, tis a V4 now.


49064



All 8 piston assemblies installed and everything in tolerance. For a DIY home refresh it feels like a properly rebuild engine as the drag from the rings is very noticeable, even on worn bores.


49065



Taped up and in the paint booth.


49066



No ugly shades of Ford blue will be on this one.

More to come.

Cheers
 

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Hi DesertXL,

Very nice work, thanks for sharing. :)

Just a note on clocking the cam bearings....
I've heard (read) somewhere that the oil hole can/should be anywhere from 3:00 to 5:00 and the reason is....
when the engine is running it develops an "oil wedge" between the journal and bearing, thus the cam journal "floats" on that oil wedge.
Dunno if this is true, but it seems to make sense.

One other point of engine assembly maybe worth mentioning...

Once the block is prepped and main bearings are laid in....
Many guys will lay the crankshaft in the block and give it a spin....:eek: before installing the main caps. :eek:

That is a big no-no as the bearing shells are not yet "round" since they need the "crush" of the main cap and lower bearing to become actually "round".
Spinning the crank in just the upper bearing shells will scuff those bearings!

I'm sure you know this, just thought I'd mention it. :)
 

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Hello,

This is a new thread I'm starting on yet another project car. Actually I have a basket case '68 XL fastback that I was going to start after these two '66's were done. However another '68 XL fastback sort of fell into my lap that is cosmetically superior to my original XL pile of junk. However whilst this looks far better than my old one, it has many mechanical, electrical and vacuum problems.

Some have asked well if it has so many problems, why did I buy it. Good question. My XL is missing key trim and the trim that is present most of it is pretty bad and would need reconditioning. Then there is finding the missing bits. I ran an estimate of what it would take to make my old XL's body look as nice as this new XL and it would be about 3 times what I paid for this one. So whilst this XL wasn't cheap, it was cost effective in the long run and it saves me time.

Here's my old pile of '68 XL


47763




47764




47765



Oof! what a mess. It was delivered not running as it sat for decades but I did get it running and drivable. The frame is rotted and portions of the body as well including the floor pans/braces and trunk pan.

Now a word on 1968 XL's. The reason why I bought this is because it has what I call the tri-fecta of options rarely found in these. They are an FE big block (usually they came with a 302), factory A/C (expensive option back then) and bucket seats/centre console with floor shift (even though it's an XL you could get them with a bench and column shift).

In the years I've owned this I've only seen 3 others come up for sale that had all three of these options, that includes the one I just bought.


47766




47767




47768




47769




47770



This car also has one more valuable, well at least to me, option. That is a factory AM-FM stereo. The reason why this is a valuable option is I've been trying to find the clear dash lens for this for years and have been unsuccessful. You see for the 1968 dash withcidentally looks very similar to the '65/'66 dash Ford made the dash different for AM only and AM-FM stereo. I have two extra of these AM-FM stereo radios and one NOS black plastic applique but I haven't been able to find the clear dash lens either NOS or used. That begs the question how do you put a price a part you cannot get?

This car was owned for 28 years from the people I bought it from, they did try to take care of it, but the problem was plain to see that lack of research or willingness to buy expensive parts or have the correct part sent off for overhaul led to compounding problems. Also the seller was very honest and said this car has near enough 300,000 miles on it, well 291K but now were just splitting hairs

It was the wifes daily driver for all those years. I respect that.

This car actually broke down getting it off the trailer when we made it back home, so right off the bat with the problems. Actually the crappy aftermarket Pertronix ignition module shorted. When we made it back home from Arizona it was late (about 8.5 hours one way with truck and trailer) and very cold. The owner said he didn't use coolant but distilled water, oh here we go again, so I couldn't leave it outside in the teens. My better half and I were both beat and so we thought well it should take about about 15 minutes to unstrap the car and drive it into the heated garage.

HAH, 3 hours later. I started the car on the trailer and let it warm up whilst we undid the straps and chains. We laid the ramps and I proceeded to release the parking brake I set on the trailer only to find the previous people didn't use it much and it was half stuck on and the brakes dragging. Well crap, off to a good start <rolling eyes>. With that I just figured I would overpower the parking brakes with the engine and proceeded to reverse off the trailer. No problems there. I shifted from reverse to drive and it just stalled. I cranked and cranked and cranked it and not a glimmer of a light off.

<sigh>

We couldn't push it because the brakes were dragging. It felt like someone just turned the key off, so I figured ignition, so after a brief diagnostic the crappy Pertronix just failed right then and there, the driver transistor was shorted on. I remembered I had an FE distributor replete with a functioning set of points and condenser somewhere in the parts reserve in a very cold storage garage. Eventually found it and proceed to replace the distributor for my old points spare in 15 degree weather. Eventually I did and it started and I drove it into the garage.

So I thought this would be different approach to owning and driving an old car, one that isn't so bad it's not in dire need of a complete tear down but one that could be mended along the way keeping the car drivable as much as possible.

I've been driving it around the subdivision making notes of everything I find wrong and boy oh boy it's a lot.

Here's the list so far of problems after two days:

1.) Charging system voltage low at idle, also it has the wrong alternator
2.) Clock doesn't work
3.) Radio only has one channel working, the FM stereo light occasionally works, AM sensitivity is really poor, FM seems fine.
4.) Glove box latch sticks
5.) Hazard switch doesn't flash the rear tail lamps
6.) Hissing noise from dash, when in heat mode, some air is coming out the dash main vents
7.) Wrong brake booster and doesn't hold vacuum.
8.) Transmission has shift kit and shifts hard. I don't like that so that will have to go.
9.) Every time it shifts there is a loud clunk from the rear axle. Cardan joints and or entire differential with gears are worn.
10.) Engine has low oil pressure (that's a given with near enough 300K miles, it's not a diesel).
11.) Parking brake sticks, needs new cables.
12.) Either the thermostat is stuck open or there is no thermostat as there is little to no heat.
13.) Needs a proper OEM electronic ignition system.
14.) The seller said it needs alignment of which I grew immediately suspicious and had a look and sure enough some clown put new strut rod bushings in and flipped the cupped washers around, so the bushings move around and so does the strut rods and the lower control arms. <rolling eyes>
15.) They replaced the front springs and the front end sits to high, needs original XL springs for FE, PS, and A/C installed.
16.) The right interior kick panel vent doesn't seem to be connected.
17.) The reupholstered front seats aren't done properly and the drivers seat especially rubs on the centre console, it will need another new set of proper seat covers.
18.) Hidden headlamp assembly is missing rubber bumpers and some hardware and is painfully slow to open and close. Will do an electric conversion. That's one old thing I don't mind upgrading.
19.) Back seat feels like the springs are broken or stretched.
20.) Needs new rear package tray liner, this one is carpeted.
21.) Has some tacky aluminum radiator, needs original brass copper one.
22.) Fan shroud is cracked.
23.) Has some hideous aftermarket flex fan that is about 3" smaller than the original fan. This needs to get tossed and the original clutch fan reinstalled.
24.) Someone installed an Edelbrock carb but plumbed it horribly.
25.) The seller had a new York compressor installed and changed one hose and the expansion valve, but since it still has the original receiver drier I bet it still has some mineral oil (R12) and the new compressor came with PAG (R134). Those two oils when mixed, heated and have some moisture in the system create an acid that attacks aluminum. That entire HVAC system will have to be dismantled, the evaporator and condenser inspected and flushed and everything else replaced. Probably a new proper brass copper heater core as well.
26.) The wiring in the car is very baked, it all needs to be replaced.
27.) Both torsion springs for the deck lid broke and need replacing.
28.) The floor shift feels loose and worn.
29.) There's an Edelbrock aluminum coolant pump, or in this case quite literally water pump, and I'm wondering if it's a high flow model. Seems out of place. If it is I will convert it back to a normal flow coolant pump as it's just wasting horsepower.
30.) The harmonic damper isn't correct, it has a later year part number code on it. Need to check TDC.
31.) The A/C idler pulley looks original and probably about to fail. Need to retrofit it with a replaceable one since these are discontinued.
32.) Wrong power steering pump

How's that for a short list :)

Now I knew ahead of time what I was getting into but someone else might look at this and would never realize all the problems it has and it would be ruinously expensive to take to an expert to sort it all out if you didn't know much about these cars or had access to parts cars with the correct parts on them.

The good news is I've relegated my junky '68 XL and junky '68 LTD as parts cars. My old XL whilst missing trim was 100% complete and original in the engine bay, so loads of hard to find correct parts to be had.

The plan is rather than take a part off the new XL and rebuild it/replace it, I will take it off one of the other parts cars and rebuild/refurbish it and then do a parts change on the new XL. This applies to everything from the clock to the engine.

The last spot of good news is I've been collecting parts, new and NOS for my old XL for years. I have boxes upon boxes of parts ready for this new XL as well.

So instead of my usual long boring posts on building a car up from a bare frame, this one will more spontaneous and dealing with individual problems and mending them whilst keeping the car drivable. Thought it might be something different.

Cheers
Hello, I know it's old but I'm in search of a hood ornament and the fish gill chrome on both fenders. Any help would be very much appreciated. Here's a couple pics of my resto I completed myself.
 

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