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Hey Guys, I have a 1972 Ford Mustang base model with a 302 engine and a edlebrock carb. I am currently shopping around for a new mechanical fuel pump and am a bit confused as far as the GPH and PSI's each pump is capable of emitting. my car is daily driven and never raced or pushed too hard, it has been however, lightly modded by the previous owner. What is the best mechanical pump for my car as far as GPH and PSI's, And if possible any recommendations for a particular mechanical pump? i would prefer a performance pump as i have a performance carb. but any recommendation works. Thanks guys
 

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in your case a stock pump will do just fine. if you really want something "better" i recommend going to a holley or carter electric fuel pump. they put out enough pressure and flow that they will flood an engine if they are given the chance. but i think you are really confused here, the only time you really need to worry about the amount of fuel flow is when you are dealing with EFI not carbs. the stock mechanical pump is enough to send fuel to nascar engines up through the early 70s with no issues.
 

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...the stock mechanical pump is enough to send fuel to nascar engines up through the early 70s with no issues.
Really?

I must E-Mail GIBBS RACING and suggest they source their fuel pumps from AUTOZONE hence forth.

Go with the EDLEBROCK for street usage. Anything more is overkill.

The unique valve design of these pumps improves flow quantity and quality and will support engines with up to 600 hp.

The high-volume, 3/8 in. NPT inlet and outlets surpass the capacity of many other pumps. Edelbrock

Performer RPM street fuel pumps produce 6 psi and do not require a regulator.

Free Flow Rate: 110 gph Maximum Pressure (psi): 6 psi

Inlet Attachment: Female threads Inlet Size: 3/8 in.

Single Outlet Attachment: Female threads Outlet Size: 3/8 in.
 

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Really?

I must E-Mail GIBBS RACING and suggest they source their fuel pumps from AUTOZONE hence forth.

Go with the EDLEBROCK for street usage. Anything more is overkill.
you obviously missed the part of nascar engines UP TO THE EARLY 70s. remember at that point hey were only making 450 to 500hp and the sanctioning body required STOCK parts, including the STOCK fuel pump. the times are completely different after the mid 70s when engine technology really started taking off power wise with no new designs hitting the market, and people like bud moore pushing the limits of small block engines to compete with the big blocks. and even then in the late 70s and early 80s the carter 9000 competition series mechanical pump, which really wasnt much different than what was found on production cars was the usual pump found on cup engines. it wasnt until much later that engine driven cable drive fuel pumps hit the nascar allowed list.

and gibbs racing wasnt around in the ear when mechanical pumps were used. perhaps you need a history lesson?
 

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I am a big fan of the carter mechanical pumps..I have used one now for many years on a couple of different engines including my current 408..They work equally well on a near stock or very high performance engine and aren't that expensive either.
 

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you obviously missed the part of nascar engines UP TO THE EARLY 70s. remember at that point hey were only making 450 to 500hp and the sanctioning body required STOCK parts, including the STOCK fuel pump.
So now we have transcended into a NASCAR build expert.

There were no stock pumps (FORD HI-PO/HOLMAN-MOODY) used on WINSTON CUP CARS, maybe hobby classes.

A stock fuel pump will not supply a 500HP race engine.
 

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Hey Guys, I have a 1972 Ford Mustang base model with a 302 engine and a edlebrock carb. . . What is the best mechanical pump for my car as far as GPH and PSI's, . .
Welcome to the forums. :tup: The GPH and PSI answers are easy with a bit of math. You have a 145hp stock engine with upgrades. Let's say it's at 200. Let's add 10% to be safe - 220hp. How much fuel do you need for 220hp in GPH? Formulas:

Code:
HP x BSFC = pounds-per-hour fuel (PPH)
PPH / 6 pounds-per-gallon (PPG) = gallons per hour (GPH)
BSFC is Brake Specific Fuel Consumption. That's how much fuel it takes to make one HP for one hour. That number varies by engine, but is close to 0.5 PPH per HP for your engine. So:

Code:
220 X 0.5 = 110 PPH
110 PPH / 6 PPG = 18.33 GPH
And there you have it. Under 20 GPH and only when it is wide-open. Obviously a stock pump will supply more than enough for your purposes. A higher-flow pump will not hurt anything, but the excess flow that is never used is a waste of pumping energy. Bottom-line? Use whatever makes 20 GPH flow or more, at 5 to 7 PSI, and makes you giggle.

David
 

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I have the carter myself on a 331 stroker motor, I had the edelbrock pump before, the fittings are set up weird and it is hard to get everything plumed up with the oil filter in the way, I even bought the other bottom for it with the fittings coming out the bottom it was still a pain in the a$$. Carter pump from Summit or Jegs will be fine for you, stock over the counter pump from napa/autozone or where ever would work fine


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I had this eldebrock pump, the one you had the link to was different and I think would work, but this model the fittings are across from each other and while you can "clock" it there isn't a way it can go where it works real easy ImageUploadedByAutoGuide1384378683.079866.jpg


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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Welcome to the forums. :tup: The GPH and PSI answers are easy with a bit of math. You have a 145hp stock engine with upgrades. Let's say it's at 200. Let's add 10% to be safe - 220hp. How much fuel do you need for 220hp in GPH? Formulas:

Code:
HP x BSFC = pounds-per-hour fuel (PPH)
PPH / 6 pounds-per-gallon (PPG) = gallons per hour (GPH)
BSFC is Brake Specific Fuel Consumption. That's how much fuel it takes to make one HP for one hour. That number varies by engine, but is close to 0.5 PPH per HP for your engine. So:

Code:
220 X 0.5 = 110 PPH
110 PPH / 6 PPG = 18.33 GPH
And there you have it. Under 20 GPH and only when it is wide-open. Obviously a stock pump will supply more than enough for your purposes. A higher-flow pump will not hurt anything, but the excess flow that is never used is a waste of pumping energy. Bottom-line? Use whatever makes 20 GPH flow or more, at 5 to 7 PSI, and makes you giggle.

David
Thanks Brother, Really appreciate your help!! :tup:

i have a couple performance pumps in mind right now,

Not sure if this one is too over the top for how i drive my car, but it seems to correlate with all the specs my car needs.

Carter M60968 Small Block Ford 172 GPH Racing Fuel Pump - Speedway Motors, America's Oldest Speed Shop


like a couple stated, this one may be the best choice

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/edl-1725


Thanks for the Input Guys!! :D
 

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So now we have transcended into a NASCAR build expert.

There were no stock pumps (FORD HI-PO/HOLMAN-MOODY) used on WINSTON CUP CARS, maybe hobby classes.

A stock fuel pump will not supply a 500HP race engine.
i am 55 years old and i have been around the racing world, you?
 

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Originally Posted by KULTULZ

So now we have transcended into a NASCAR build expert.

There were no stock pumps (FORD HI-PO/HOLMAN-MOODY) used on WINSTON CUP CARS, maybe hobby classes.

A stock fuel pump will not supply (support) a 500HP race engine.



i am 55 years old and i have been around the racing world, you?
I am 65 years of age and was involved within the racing world, not around it.
 

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Originally Posted by KULTULZ

So now we have transcended into a NASCAR build expert.

There were no stock pumps (FORD HI-PO/HOLMAN-MOODY) used on WINSTON CUP CARS, maybe hobby classes.

A stock fuel pump will not supply (support) a 500HP race engine.





I am 65 years of age and was involved within the racing world, not around it.
i have built and tuned fuel altereds, and worked as a crew chief.
 

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Originally Posted by KULTULZ

So now we have transcended into a NASCAR build expert.

There were no stock pumps (FORD HI-PO/HOLMAN-MOODY) used on WINSTON CUP CARS, maybe hobby classes.

A stock fuel pump will not supply (support) a 500HP race engine.





I am 65 years of age and was involved within the racing world, not around it.
KULTULZ you haven't posted any useful info on this thread, or any other thread you have been throwing up on lately, there isn't a place for keyboard commandos around here, all you do is argue with people? What are you contributing? I have stood by and watch and not got involved but personally I can't even take it anymore...


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I have stood by and watch and not got involved but personally I can't even take it anymore..
Make sure you use a silver dum-dum. It will be quick and sure.
 

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i have built and tuned fuel altereds, and worked as a crew chief.
DAMN!

Excuse me while I have a mild orgasm... {{{ shudder }}}...

Anyone have a light?

How good were you on flippin' the throttle in panic stop situations?
 

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DAMN!

Excuse me while I have a mild orgasm... {{{ shudder }}}...

Anyone have a light?

How good were you on flippin' the throttle in panic stop situations?
your last two posts show just what a child you have become. perhaps one day you will get back to what you used to be but i am not holding my breath.
 
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