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Hey guys first post and first Ford. I am currently building a 1946 ford f-100 hot rod pickup. I bought the truck the 1973 351W in it.

From what I understand the windsor is the desired block and the cleavland has the desired heads. I however do not want to build a clevor. So this is what im thinking.

The truck is going to weight in the neighborhood of 2000lbs. so I do not need stupid power. The block is a good block so im thinking of putting GT40 heads on the top end, run an edelbrock performer 2181 intake for windsors and a 4bbl edelbrock 2506. However what I do know about this year windsor is the low hp rating. I assume it is bc of the junk cam and pistons. What would you guys reccomend for a mild hydraulic cam and new non domed pistons. I want to run non forged bc I do not want to drop thousands in this motor im hoping around $500 bc i already have the intake and carb.

Need some suggestions bc I do not know where to start.

Thanks
Bret
 

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How are you going to get that truck all the way down to 2,000 lbs.? I believe it was the lower compression and smaller valves of the later 351W's that reduced their output, not pistons and cam. The 69-70 blocks had a slightly shorter deck height and came with larger valves and maybe lower volume combustion chambers as well.

I just used regular cast rebuilder pistons in my engine when it was rebuilt recently. My car is just a cruiser, so it was only a stock type rebuild with cam, intake, carb and headers shown in my sig line. If you change the cam you will need all new springs and lifters to go along with it.
 

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70xl thanks for the quick reply. I guess I should have told exactly what i am building. I have a 46 ford that im making a fenderless rod with. No hood or fenders, short 4ft box rear end. z'ing the frame and channeling the box down to the ground. I was guessing 2000k pounds.

Im going to look into the build you did. What horse power are you expecting. or getting from that engine. Is the cam your running a stock replacement or a improvement. If so was it a cam kit with lifters?

Thanks
Bret
 

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The cam is not a stock replacement, but not too wild either. I bought all the matching cam train components, double roller timing set and Comp's Magnum roller tip rockers and Magnum pushrods. When modeled on Comp Cam's Cam Quest software my build showed around 350HP and 400 lbs/ft, but I would think the real world outcome would be in the 300 HP range. The engine has a slight lope at idle, but is really quite smooth, certainly a smoother idle than the stock engine had right before the rebuild. It certainly is more powerful than it was before and I am plenty happy with it for my use. The 69/70 engines had 9.5:1 compression and 71 and later were down to 8.5, or 8:1, if I remember correctly.
 

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The 73 351w had low compression - about 8.3:1 so flat top pistons will bring it close to 10:1 which will give you tons of torque. I am not sure that switching to GT-40 heads will gain you anything - I think they use the same valve sizes with smaller ports (if you grind the exhaust bumps out of the ports). If you are going to keep the rpm below 5500 then the stock heads (with the bumps removed) are easily capable of handling the airflow. choose a cam with a smooth idle - the Edelbrock Performer cam and kit is ideal for 5000 - 5500 rpm and will yield about 350 - 375 hp with 400 - 425 ft lbs of torque. In a 2000 pound vehicle it will be a great street performer and an economical cruiser. A 600 cfm carb is ideal for a street cruiser because even at 100% VE you will flow less than that. With the 3" crank main journals I would recommend a crank scraper and a high volume (NOT high pressure) oil pump and a performance engine balance. I would also recommend adjustable rockers which will require screw-in studs.
At this rpm you don't need roller rockers but to keep stem wear to a minimum I used roller tip rockers on mine. You can get rail type rockers so you don't need guide plates or hardened pushrods.
 
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