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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i just discovered i have a 289 in my spare car.

is there a way to tell if i have the hipo 289 and how do i tell if the crank is the sought after one? thanks
 

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i think all the cranks are the same arnt they but you can pull the valce covers off and look at the heads and i beleive a quick way is to see if it has screw in rocker studs and those would be hipo heads

jeff
 

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Not just screw in studs.
The True Hi-po heads have casted Pockets around the spring AND screw in studs from the factory. They offer no performace potential for us average joes. However they are worth a small mint to the collectors. I saw an umolested set go on ebay once for over $1300.
The hi-po block will have thicker main caps. Although those are easy to fake. As far as the crank being hipo, its supposed to be a better crank but i cant remember the specifics on it, although i remember its still casted. I think it will have some hardness dimples in the casted surface somewhere. Also look for the extra balance wheight behind the timing cover.
Good luck!
 

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There are a number of ways to tell if your 289 is a bona-fide Hi-Po. Some have already mentioned. If you pull the valve covers, yes you want to see if you have screw in studs and cast valve spring pockets....but a good machine shop could modify a set of heads from a non hi-po 289 to have that. What you should look for is the year stamped in the head under the valve cover (ie 66) and also look for a dot. A single dot stamped in the head under the valve cover indicates a standard 289. Double dots right next to each other indicate a factory high performance head.

Other 289 hi-po parts, include a mechanical advance distributor (who the hell started using the term dizzy for distributor??? that's terrible) with dual points. If you have a vacuum advance distributor with a single point setup, that's not a hi-po.

Also, you might be inclined to believe you have a hi-po if you say the factory 4bbl intake and 4bbl carb. But the A Code non hi-po 289's got these same carbs and manifolds. If it is a hi-po, the carb should be an Autolite 4100 with 1.12 stamped on the side and mechanical choke (not automatic choke, though in 1963 I understand some hi-po's used the automatic choke). If it's an Autolite 4100 with 1.08 and not 1.12 on the side, that's also indication that it is not a hi-po.

The 289 hi-po used a solid lifter camshaft also, all other 289 cams were hydraulic.

The cast iron exhaust manifolds on a hi-po 289 have cast webbing in between the individual "tubes" and are larger in size than the straight skinny log type exhaust manifolds used on the 289 C and A codes.

The crank and counterweight was already mentioned, but what wasn't mentioned is that the rods should have 3/8" bolts instead of the smaller 5/16" found on the non hi-po's.
 

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The harmonic balancer will also be significantly larger than stock.

Didn't know the crank was special. Thought they only tested the block for higher nickle content? The block did have bigger main caps similar to the Mexican 302's.

The rods also had larger/better rod bolts.

There will be quite a few ways to tell if it is a complete original engine.

An easy one is to see if your spare car is a k code engine vin.
 

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same crank as other 289's, they were just inspected more closely before installed in a hi po engine. "cream of the crop" crank, if you will.
 

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Hipo cranks were supposed to all be Brinnel tested for
hardness. As far as the heads go, I won't put too much
faith in the "two bumps next to each other" deal that
was mentioned a few posts ago. I've seen some that
didn't have that feature. I'll guarantee you that they all
have 18, 19, 20, 21 for casting numbers on the front of
the head. Haven't seen a real set yet that didn't have
one of those casting numbers. Look at the bolt boss
where the alternator bolt goes into the head and you'll
find a number cast there......
 

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On 2006-08-16 00:37, jtfairlane wrote:
There are a number of ways to tell if your 289 is a bona-fide Hi-Po. Some have already mentioned. If you pull the valve covers, yes you want to see if you have screw in studs and cast valve spring pockets....but a good machine shop could modify a set of heads from a non hi-po 289 to have that. What you should look for is the year stamped in the head under the valve cover (ie 66) and also look for a dot. A single dot stamped in the head under the valve cover indicates a standard 289. Double dots right next to each other indicate a factory high performance head.

Other 289 hi-po parts, include a mechanical advance distributor (who the hell started using the term dizzy for distributor??? that's terrible) with dual points. If you have a vacuum advance distributor with a single point setup, that's not a hi-po.

Also, you might be inclined to believe you have a hi-po if you say the factory 4bbl intake and 4bbl carb. But the A Code non hi-po 289's got these same carbs and manifolds. If it is a hi-po, the carb should be an Autolite 4100 with 1.12 stamped on the side and mechanical choke (not automatic choke, though in 1963 I understand some hi-po's used the automatic choke). If it's an Autolite 4100 with 1.08 and not 1.12 on the side, that's also indication that it is not a hi-po.

The 289 hi-po used a solid lifter camshaft also, all other 289 cams were hydraulic.

The cast iron exhaust manifolds on a hi-po 289 have cast webbing in between the individual "tubes" and are larger in size than the straight skinny log type exhaust manifolds used on the 289 C and A codes.

The crank and counterweight was already mentioned, but what wasn't mentioned is that the rods should have 3/8" bolts instead of the smaller 5/16" found on the non hi-po's.
I'm glad someone else thinks the same as me,the first thing that comes to my mind when someone refers to a distributor as a "dizzy" is a 16yr old bling bling kid working on his grandmas honda.
 

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oh hell come on dizzy is not that big of a deal, after work when most people are tired of typing , its just easier to abbreviate
 

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The hipo heads have casting numbers with the fourth character a "Z" the 66 would be C5OZ (made in 1965), the 67 heads had C7ZZ. None of the HIPO heads came with rail rockers. They had the deep valve spring pockets that were cast in (if they are machined they didn't come from Ford that way) and shorter rocker stud height with screw in studs.
The stud bosses have to be machined .3" for the screw in studs.
Paul

The blocks are the same only the main caps are thicker. The crank is the high nodular iron crank # C3OZ 6303 B and uses an add on counterweight.
The HIPO rods had 3/8" rod bolts but the heads of the bolts were rectangular - the Boss 302 used the same rods with football shaped heads and are stronger.

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: PaulS1950 on 8/17/06 3:35pm ]</font>
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
thanks for all the 289 responses. not a hipo but i will keep the crank should i ever tear it down.
i say dizzy sometimes, heck that rotor must get dizzy. if i dont have to say syllables i dont. i think the root of the problem is the di stri bu tor.
 
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