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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
When I bought my car someone had clear coated the intake manifold. Now it is yellow and chipping off. I was gonna pull it off and sand blast it, but I am wondering if I should just buy a new manifold. It has a Edelbrock Victor JR on it. Here is what I do not understand (be nice)....According to the Victor Jr specs, the max HP range is from 3500-8500rpm. I like low end power and torque, even when I normal shift, I am under 3500 rpm. 3500-8500 seems kind of high. Can someone explain this to me? I was looking at the Edelbrock RPM Air Gap manifold. They say the power range is 1500-6000rpm. Am I wasting my money changing manifolds? Should I just clean up the Victor Jr?
 

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the Why . that the only mod along with a 4V carb ?
no other mod's then iis big the better thinking .

that's the only mod , then a performer would be a better manifold for your rpm range
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
the Why . that the only mod along with a 4V carb ?
no other mod's then iis big the better thinking .

that's the only mod , then a performer would be a better manifold for your rpm range
Dart heads, pretty lopy cam, mechanical and electric fuel pump with regulator, Ford Motorsports distributor with mechanical advance, MSD 6al. Definitely not a stock engine. If I was gonna run the car at the track I could see having something in that RPM range, but I do not plan on doing that. Thats about all I know about the engine
 

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Dart heads, pretty lopy cam, mechanical and electric fuel pump with regulator, Ford Motorsports distributor with mechanical advance, MSD 6al. Definitely not a stock engine. If I was gonna run the car at the track I could see having something in that RPM range, but I do not plan on doing that. Thats about all I know about the engine
I'd get a Performer RPM (non air gap) . that would be a good compromise , not given up much on either end
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'd get a Performer RPM (non air gap) . that would be a good compromise , not given up much on either end
So this will improve performance/acceleration in my driving range? Or it will be about the same as my existing manifold?
 

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It has a Edelbrock Victor JR on it. Here is what I do not understand (be nice)....According to the Victor Jr specs, the max HP range is from 3500-8500rpm.
The Victor JR is for high RPM track/hot street. It offers very little low end torque.

The PERFORMER RPM will give you much better street manners. Talk with EDLEBROCK TECH.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
The Victor JR is for high RPM track/hot street. It offers very little low end torque.

The PERFORMER RPM will give you much better street manners. Talk with EDLEBROCK TECH.
There is what I was asking (DanH, sorry I didnt know how to word it). Thanks Dan and Kultulz.
Will definitely call Edelbrock tech,
 

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There is what I was asking (DanH, sorry I didnt know how to word it). Thanks Dan and Kultulz.
Will definitely call Edelbrock tech,
youi will find that the manifold is a small bandaid , for what you want .

btw , you did word it correct for your need from the engine .
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="10" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td>Ford 260-289-302 V8

VICTOR JR. 302 (3500-8000 rpm)
Designed for Ford 289/302 competition engines using modified stock cast iron or aftermarket Windsor-style cylinder heads such as Edelbrock heads #60259, #77169 and #77219 or equivalent. The Victor Jr. #2921 has no rear water crossover. Port exit size at cylinder head is 1.90" x 1.08" with enough extra material to open it up to 2.10" x 1.18". </td><td align="center" width="250">
</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2"> <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" height="126" width="479"><tbody><tr bgcolor="#000000"><td class="tahbwh2">Applications</td><td class="tahbwh2" align="center" bgcolor="#FF0000" width="10%">Part #</td></tr><tr bgcolor="#D9F2FC"><td class="tah2">Victor Jr. 302 (non-EGR)</td><td class="tah2" align="center">#2921*</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2">
</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="spc">Carburetor Recommendations: Use appropriate racing carburetor.

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

That is one big intake for the street. Single plane. Hopefully the PERFORMER PLUS will make it more street-able.

It must be a bear to cruise in... :eek:

:confused:

You know... Someone built that engine for serious usage. You might have to go in and calm the cam and compression down to make it a driver.

The new intake, whether RPM or Air Gap (Dual Plane) might just choke it down to aggravate you as the valve-train is most likely setup for serious usage.

Make sure you talk with a TECH so you can't blame me... :)


</td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table>
 

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<TABLE cellSpacing=10 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD>Ford 260-289-302 V8

VICTOR JR. 302 (3500-8000 rpm)
Designed for Ford 289/302 competition engines using modified stock cast iron or aftermarket Windsor-style cylinder heads such as Edelbrock heads #60259, #77169 and #77219 or equivalent. The Victor Jr. #2921 has no rear water crossover. Port exit size at cylinder head is 1.90" x 1.08" with enough extra material to open it up to 2.10" x 1.18".
</TD><TD align=middle width=250>
</TD></TR><TR><TD colSpan=2><TABLE height=126 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=479 border=0><TBODY><TR bgColor=#000000><TD class=tahbwh2>Applications</TD><TD class=tahbwh2 align=middle width="10%" bgColor=#ff0000>Part #</TD></TR><TR bgColor=#d9f2fc><TD class=tah2>Victor Jr. 302 (non-EGR)</TD><TD class=tah2 align=middle>#2921*</TD></TR><TR><TD colSpan=2>

</TD></TR><TR><TD class=spc colSpan=2>Carburetor Recommendations: Use appropriate racing carburetor.

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

That is one big intake for the street. Single plane. Hopefully the PERFORMER PLUS will make it more street-able.

It must be a bear to cruise in... :eek:

:confused:

You know... Someone built that engine for serious usage. You might have to go in and calm the cam and compression down to make it a driver.

The new intake, whether RPM or Air Gap (Dual Plane) might just choke it down to aggravate you as the valve-train is most likely setup for serious usage.

Make sure you talk with a TECH so you can't blame me... :)



</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
should have just cut & pasted my bandaid post .
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Pretty good article here explaining single plane and dual plane intakes.
Performance Intake Manifolds

You can have the best of both worlds. Looks like my biggest issue is the single plane intake. Explains why my car always hesitates off throttle unless you really tromp it.
 

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Pretty good article here explaining single plane and dual plane intakes.
Performance Intake Manifolds

You can have the best of both worlds. Looks like my biggest issue is the single plane intake. Explains why my car always hesitates off throttle unless you really tromp it.
intake type has nothing to do with hesitating. the tune does
 

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You can have the best of both worlds. Looks like my biggest issue is the single plane intake. Explains why my car always hesitates off throttle unless you really tromp it.
Correct. A single plane intake on a wet manifold type is for HI-RPM usage only. It is meant to flow @ very HI-RPM's. The fuel charge will separate from the air flow @ low RPM. It has no allowance for tip-in or part throttle. It is designed for hard launches and the last time I checked that is not considered street-able.

You may still have trouble with the engine build but at the least this will give you some control.
 

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Correct. A single plane intake on a wet manifold type is for HI-RPM usage only. It is meant to flow @ very HI-RPM's. The fuel charge will separate from the air flow @ low RPM. It has no allowance for tip-in or part throttle. It is designed for hard launches and the last time I checked that is not considered street-able.

You may still have trouble with the engine build but at the least this will give you some control.
klutz , you need hands on
there are many single plane manifolds used on the street , without any issues
 

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klutz , you need hands on
there are many single plane manifolds used on the street , without any issues
+1.......I am running a vic jr on my current engine and before that I ran a wieand Xcellerator single plane on my old 302..Both work very well and definetely do not have any hesitation issues..However they do require a complete package to work well including proper gearing..
 

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I think you will be pleasantly surprised by how much more responsive the RPM is over the Victor Jr-especially on a mild engine like yours.

The Victor Jr is an excellent intake manifold for the 351w, but it really shines at upper RPM ranges, 5000-7500 is about where it's doing it's best. From about 1000 RPM to about 5000-ish, the RPM absolutely KILLS the victor Jr in responsiveness, fuel economy, and the butt-o-meter dyno. This is speaking from experience.

I like the air-gap myself, but the regular RPM did give me better MPG because the intake ran hotter (which atomized fuel a little better)....BUT, the regular non-airgap style also had a tendancy to boil the fuel in the Edelbrock carburetor.

I can tell you this: Mine was mild. 9.5:1 compression flat tops, iron heads, 750 4 barrel Edelbrock carb, typical headers/exhaust....1.94/1.50 valves in the ported iron heads. Nothing special-probably made max HP about 350 HP and probably around 5500 RPM. Pretty much a turd in my opinion. Originally I built it with a Victor Jr hoping for good top end HP, and the top end was decent. No race car but decent. 5000 to redline (about 6000 RPM max). I traded it for a RPM non air-gap. With the Jr, it would not spin the tires off idle (C6 with 1500 stall speed...about stock). With the RPM, it would spin all the way through first and well into 2nd gear from a dead stop. Overall responsiveness for "street driving" was excellent-it felt like a different engine.

Now if I had kept and and bumped the compression up to about 12:1, put a big solid roller in it and a 4500-5000 converter, the JR would have worked great. But then you get into race car territory....and that wasn't the intended purpose of that old ragged 351. I just happened to have the Jr intake laying around from a previous project that worked better with a super victor.

Real world comparison. I'll say it again-the victor JR is a great intake, it's just not great for a street-type car/truck. Surely someone out there might trade their RPM for your victor jr. I've done this twice-once on a 351w and once on a 302. The 302 with a victor jr (in my case) was a turd, but it woke up with the RPM. Just lost exactly 1 mph on the drag strip, but picked up some ET. And drove 100x better on the street.

Now if you were running methanol, a Jr works great for that....but you're also talking about roughly twice the volume of fuel running through the runners; assuming carburetion. Our stuff is all injected now and it doesn't make that much difference with intake design. Some difference but not night-and-day like on a carb'd motor.
 

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BUT, the regular non-airgap style also had a tendancy to boil the fuel in the Edelbrock carburetor.
Interesting observation. My newly learned factoid for the day... :tup:
 
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