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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, can anybody tell me how critical it is to have a coil specifically for an original Transistored Ignition in a 63.5 R code Galaxie

I know the part numbers are different, The coil in mine is part number FAC 12029-A, and the Transistor Ignition Coil is part number, C3TF 12029-A.

I have the small " Service Specifications " hand book that came with the car, and all the Resistances and Amperages for the 2 coils are very different, Not being an Auto Electrician, the numbers don't mean a lot to me, except that it's worth looking into,

Any help would be much appreciated

Thanks, larry
 

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Any luck Larry?
I'm sure someone would know the answer. :)
 

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I have the small " Service Specifications " hand book that came with the car, and all the Resistances and Amperages for the 2 coils are very different, Not being an Auto Electrician, the numbers don't mean a lot to me, except that it's worth looking into,
What are the listed resistances and amperages of the two coils?
 

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This is from the service manual. I hope you can read it.

 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Gday Dan and bmcd66250

Hey Dan Thanks for chuckin that on for me, i was just in the process of trying to work out how to do so, when i found that you, My Secretary, had already beaten me to the punch,

bmcd66259, if you can't read the page that Dan put on for me, let us know and either me or my lovely secretary, DAN, LOL, will put the resistances, amp draw etc up for you . Thanks for your interest

larry
 

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LOL Larry. You crack me up! :)

You're almost as funny as that FEandGoingBroke bloke.
 

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Looks like the coil primary circuit for the transistorized ignition has a coil resistance about 5X the standard ignition and the ballast resistor is about 5X higher, too. I'd bet the lower resistance standard coil setup would overheat and damage the transistor ignition. It might be possible to get it to run with a really large value ballast resistor, 10-12 ohms, but it wouldn't be very efficient. You would have a very high voltage drop across the resistor and not much left to drive the coil.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hi bmcd66250

Thanks for taking the time to post that info for me,

It turns out that although the TI system is all still in the car and all hooked up, the system has been bypassed and a standard type coil fitted,

Since i first submitted the post, i found a NOS C3TF 12A027-A coil on Ebay, i was successful with my bid $125, which i was pretty happy with, I am now going to get the TI system back up and operating, But first i will, with the assistance of my Auto Electrician mate, try and find out if there is a problem with any of the components that prompted someone to disconnect the system in the first place,

Thanks for all your input, and if you have any other info that you think may be of interest to me, Don't hesitate to let me know

Thanks Again, larry
 

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You'll most likely damage the Electronic Ignition if your use a low resistance primary standard coil. The load will be too high for it. Looks like the Electronic Ignition wants 14 to 18 total ohms on the output vs 2.5 to 3 ohms for standard. You could use a standard coil with 1.5 ohms and a 12 to 14 ohm ballast resistor, but very little voltage will be on the primary in this config. 1.5 / (1.5 + 14) X 12 volts or about 1 volt on the primary. If the coil had a much higher turns ratio (secondary turns vs primary turns), it could feasibly work this way, but I doubt you could find such a coil.

Get the high resistance coil that is called out or find a high resistance coil and change the ballast resistor so the overall load resistance is 14 to 18 ohms.

There are high power electronic switching transistors nowadays such as power MOSFETS that they didn't have back then that can handle many Amps. Those old Electronic Ignitions weren't very sophisticated. Reliability probably wasn't great either.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hi Tracy

That's great information, thanks for that, I now have a NOS, correct Ford transistor ignition coil on its way from the U.S. to Australia, All of the valuable info that you good people have posted for me has been filed into my "Galaxie" file of my computor, and i have also printed it out onto A4 sheets, just in case of a computor failure

All of the help is much appreciated, larry
 
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