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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First-time post here, and hopefully I can get some ideas on a minor question: is there a simple way to adjust rear ride height?

I have a 67 Galaxie 500 two-door hardtop with the 390. This was the car I learned how to drive in and was a gift from my grandmother when I turned 16. I drove it all through high school and now I finally have it in my name after my father's stewardship since then. I need to correct many ills with the car starting with the suspension. I am also learning about the car mechanically as I go, as I have not worked on it since a teenager.

The issue is that for many years, it has had an uneven squat in the rear with the driver's side about 1 1/2" lower than the passenger's side. I like a slight rake or an at-least neutral stance. Eaton said that the factory setting on this car was a 1" lower ride height in the rear to begin with, then they tend to often sag over time, not necessarily evenly.

So, I started with installing a set of 1" heavy-duty rear lift springs from Eaton with new KYB shocks. The overall rear height is now much better but I still have about a 1" lower height on the driver's side.

The fore-to-aft control arm on the passenger's side has what looks like an eccentric bolt with the head pointing outboard - see the dead center of the attached pic back behind the shock. Can that bolt be used to adjust rear height? It looks like it might also introduce fore-and-aft movement of the axle if turned, which could be a problem.

Caveats:

-We've known the history of this car since new. It's never been in a wreck or other event that would create these issues.
-I recognize that uneven wear or other issues with the front springs/suspension could be to blame, introducing diagonal ride height effects. Many might say you need to replace all four corners at once to know what's up. I may be doing an engine swap and/or installing an entirely different front steering and suspension set-up. So, I am holding off on investing in front suspension components for the moment.

Thanks all!
 

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First-time post here, and hopefully I can get some ideas on a minor question: is there a simple way to adjust rear ride height?

I have a 67 Galaxie 500 two-door hardtop with the 390. This was the car I learned how to drive in and was a gift from my grandmother when I turned 16. I drove it all through high school and now I finally have it in my name after my father's stewardship since then. I need to correct many ills with the car starting with the suspension. I am also learning about the car mechanically as I go, as I have not worked on it since a teenager.

The issue is that for many years, it has had an uneven squat in the rear with the driver's side about 1 1/2" lower than the passenger's side. I like a slight rake or an at-least neutral stance. Eaton said that the factory setting on this car was a 1" lower ride height in the rear to begin with, then they tend to often sag over time, not necessarily evenly.

So, I started with installing a set of 1" heavy-duty rear lift springs from Eaton with new KYB shocks. The overall rear height is now much better but I still have about a 1" lower height on the driver's side.

The fore-to-aft control arm on the passenger's side has what looks like an eccentric bolt with the head pointing outboard - see the dead center of the attached pic back behind the shock. Can that bolt be used to adjust rear height? It looks like it might also introduce fore-and-aft movement of the axle if turned, which could be a problem.

Caveats:

-We've known the history of this car since new. It's never been in a wreck or other event that would create these issues.
-I recognize that uneven wear or other issues with the front springs/suspension could be to blame, introducing diagonal ride height effects. Many might say you need to replace all four corners at once to know what's up. I may be doing an engine swap and/or installing an entirely different front steering and suspension set-up. So, I am holding off on investing in front suspension components for the moment.

Thanks all!
That is used to adjust pinion angle. You could always install a coil spring airbag on the driver side to even it up.
 

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I thing you are correct that the front springs are worn and influencing the whole car to lean. Check bushings on the lower control arms. Possible one on the drivers side is destroyed causing a lean.
The suspension on these cars is pretty good. I’d recommend reconditioning the suspension over replacing with a new design. Much cheaper and likely easier.
 

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I am restoring a 67 LTD Fastback 390. My car has new springs all the way around, but with the wider tires and rims which are on it, the tires rub just slightly on major bumps. I just ordered new springs from KC Spring (785) 437-2025 which were engineered 1.25 inch taller. I am willing to part with the nearly brand-new rear coil springs. Or new ones are available for around $300.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks all for the responses so far.

For those who didn't, please see my "caveats" at the bottom of the original post on recognizing the potential for blame in the front suspension.

I'm not looking to add the complexity of a bag.

I'm not sure if the message on springs for sale was directed to me; as above, I just bought and installed new rear springs from Eaton. I don't think these new springs are a problem; in fact, the height imbalance improved a bit with them.

As I won't be making big changes to the front suspension until I make the decisions mentioned there, I suspect I may just have to live with the ride height imbalance until then. It's a minor cosmetic issue more than anything, since the car seems to ride OK with these new springs in the back.
 

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Some new front coils are rather cheap, so you wouldn't be out much to swap in some new springs until you figure out the suspension you think you want.
 
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That bolt you took a picture of is for the single upper trailing arm connecting the rear axle to the frame...it is adjusted (slight adjustment in stock form) to align the pinion with the transmission output (ie: driveshaft angle)...reduces vibration, helps with traction, etc. It isn't really meant to have an effect on spring height because the spring perches essentially stay at the same basic "height" even if you adjust the trailing arm. However, the spring perches are on the front of the rear axle, so tilting the rear axle with the upper trailing arm COULD bring the spring perch up, but that would be bilaterally and will introduce a nasty vibration if you throw the pinion angle off.

I have this adjustable one on mine, but I only adjusted it for pinion angle and not to fix a ride height issue.

Adj upper trailing arm

The rear lower trailing arms are non-adjustable units, but also shouldn't affect ride height (unless one of the mounting points was damaged somehow...but that would introduce a whole bunch of other issues back there).

When you replaced the springs, did you put new rubber spring seats in? Notice anything odd about the perches (upper or lower)? Maybe she was just welded funny from the factory?

I went with a complete Hotchkis kit on my '65, and even after it was done I swore it was not sitting 100% even at all four corners until I took pics at different locations. I found that for some reason, the surface you are on has a distorting effect on this particular car with regards to the stance. But maybe that's just in my head, lol
 
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First-time post here, and hopefully I can get some ideas on a minor question: is there a simple way to adjust rear ride height?

I have a 67 Galaxie 500 two-door hardtop with the 390. This was the car I learned how to drive in and was a gift from my grandmother when I turned 16. I drove it all through high school and now I finally have it in my name after my father's stewardship since then. I need to correct many ills with the car starting with the suspension. I am also learning about the car mechanically as I go, as I have not worked on it since a teenager.

The issue is that for many years, it has had an uneven squat in the rear with the driver's side about 1 1/2" lower than the passenger's side. I like a slight rake or an at-least neutral stance. Eaton said that the factory setting on this car was a 1" lower ride height in the rear to begin with, then they tend to often sag over time, not necessarily evenly.

So, I started with installing a set of 1" heavy-duty rear lift springs from Eaton with new KYB shocks. The overall rear height is now much better but I still have about a 1" lower height on the driver's side.

The fore-to-aft control arm on the passenger's side has what looks like an eccentric bolt with the head pointing outboard - see the dead center of the attached pic back behind the shock. Can that bolt be used to adjust rear height? It looks like it might also introduce fore-and-aft movement of the axle if turned, which could be a problem.

Caveats:

-We've known the history of this car since new. It's never been in a wreck or other event that would create these issues.
-I recognize that uneven wear or other issues with the front springs/suspension could be to blame, introducing diagonal ride height effects. Many might say you need to replace all four corners at once to know what's up. I may be doing an engine swap and/or installing an entirely different front steering and suspension set-up. So, I am holding off on investing in front suspension components for the moment.

Thanks all!
Remove both leaf springs out of rear with bolts add extra leaf springs to each side with longer U-Bolts, and that will fix your problem. Have A Nice Day!! 🙂
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Dakar09: yes, I installed new rubber seats for the rear springs, and of course there was nothing obvious about the rear suspension components that would explain the differing height. It is most likely the front suspension.

Overall, I am going to kick this can down the road until I settle on the engine and front suspension plan.
 
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