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Discussion Starter #41
Cool, I have a cruise every 2nd and 4th Fri of the month at the Sams at Ches Square - look me up or PM me to hook up. I will be at the City Park show next Sat trying to move some parts that are piling up.
Hey quite a lot of good work you've done there. Just checking in since I'm also in Chesapeake. I'll be looking for you on the streets to admire the finished product.

I put in my crankshaft, pistons and cam today, but came up short on a couple connecting rod nuts. Mine will hopefully be on the street in the near future. It's been sidelined by life for a while.
 

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Discussion Starter #42
I started my cowl removal and repair project, thought I would upload a few pics. Lots of spot welds here, getting the dash and gauges out, windshield too. Great fun though. Also tossed in a pic of my Chebby truck that will be my Mustang hauler one day, so I made it up old school and it has the reverse color scheme the Stang will have, white on blue.
I have done a couple of tech articles on the apron/rad support and shock tower notches, but with all the hoopla going on, I guess they are not posting new tech articles. Sad.







 

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Discussion Starter #44
Thanks, now if I can get the car done. I know its a Chebby, and I sort of felt the ground shake when I posted it. Would love to find an early 70s Ford F100 Shortbed to fix up like this.
Absolutely love the old school look. It goes great with the Stang!
 

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Discussion Starter #45
Whats is lurking under your Cowl top, be afraid, very afraid.
Got the top off the cowl, the Bernzomatic Big Torch did the trick, I think. Guess there is no way to work these brazed seams out without bending the corners of the cowl top all to heck.
I think I can salvage it, tap it back smooth and tack in some end tabs where I tore up the corners working tem off the brass welds.
The underside of the cowl was not overly bad, it can be fixed. I did find a fuel pump gasket, various nuts, bolts, wire terminal pieces , sand and brackets of all sorts in this thing. What a piss poor design from Ford. The drain holes are not even the lowest point of thecowl, so even if the drain is not plugged, it wouldn't drain 100%.
Now to order the replacement vent patches and start getting it ready to go back together. Lots of stripping and fixing holes I got a little crazy with the spot weld cutter.









 

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Isn't the cowl so much fun to work on? I have done it 3 times already....took me about 3.5-4 hrs to take that top cowl off...what lurked below would make any horror movie tame! When I took the upper cowl off of my '65 falcon wagon the prior owner had sprayed some silicone sealant up the ds cowl vent assembly...that crap just peeled off and covered up what someone didn't want to do properly (patch panel replacement)....Just make sure you POR-15 the whole lower cowl to insure proper sealing from water....they also make a cowl cover that screws down onto the upper cowl so it blocks water and leaves from getting in in the middle...Personally myself I wouldn't park under trees and that baby would be in the garage when not being used
 

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Discussion Starter #47
Isn't the cowl so much fun to work on? I have done it 3 times already....took me about 3.5-4 hrs to take that top cowl off...what lurked below would make any horror movie tame! When I took the upper cowl off of my '65 falcon wagon the prior owner had sprayed some silicone sealant up the ds cowl vent assembly...that crap just peeled off and covered up what someone didn't want to do properly (patch panel replacement)....Just make sure you POR-15 the whole lower cowl to insure proper sealing from water....they also make a cowl cover that screws down onto the upper cowl so it blocks water and leaves from getting in in the middle...Personally myself I wouldn't park under trees and that baby would be in the garage when not being used
Thanks, definately POR 15. Not sure why I am even bothering doing all this as the car is going to be street car/track mule - but I do try to keep the butchering to the minimum with an eye on being able to put it back some day. Getting the sucker off does take some time and patience though.
 

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Discussion Starter #48
Here is an update on my cowl project, its slow going between a school, water ski tournament, kids etc. This is a tedious job as well, so I am taking a bit more time with it. I tackled the passenger side first as it’s a straight forward patch panel replacement that didn’t require me to mess with windshield wiper motor holes and other obstructions.
Got the old one out, measured the panel to fit, and cut it, prepped the surfaces, de rusted and painted inside the firewall etc while I had it opened. Tacked in the patch, and welded up the seam (lots of tack welds there).
I am going to move to the other side and get it patched in before I finish welding in the patch panel spot welds, want to be sure it all fits and the cowl top line back up.
I finally posted a couple of tech articles in the suspension and body sections on the radiator support/fender apron job and the shock tower notching.
This cowl will be another tech article when I get it done.




 

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Discussion Starter #50
Making a little progress on the cowl. Got the passenger side tacked in. Cut out the driver side, it was the worst.
A lot of corners and bevels to work around. Iwanted to keep as much original stuff as I could on the driver side as there is a lot more to work around, wiper motor mounts, clutch/brake mounts and some re-enforcement braces.
It was easier to remove the old one following the contours of the cowl and cut out the new one to fit.







Mustang trivia – what is this thing? It can be a problem for you.

 

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Discussion Starter #52
Looking GREAT!
Thanks, PMd you on a question regarding that big gap you see where the orig and replacment panels are not the same. You cant get buy the perfect match panels so I will have to fab something up.
 

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Discussion Starter #54
Thanks, great minds think alike. After I pmd you, I got to thinking it would be a PITA to try to cut and bend the new panel up and it wouldnt reach anyway.

I will have to trim it back as the clutch/brake braket is right under the end of the new piece and hitting a bit, but I have whats left of the pass side I took out and it was in better shape, so I can massage the radius of that into this, keeping all going down hill

I always like having someone validate and improve on my ideas before I start melting crap together. Thanks man.
 

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Discussion Starter #55 (Edited)
Great rainy day – couldn’t get to the lake to ski, but a great day to get stuff done. Took the girls out and bought us all new cowboy boots, stopped by Harbor Freight, and then came home to knock out some work on the cowl.
I bought a pneumatic reciprocating saw from Harbor Freight. That thing is pretty cool, makes quick precise cuts a lot faster and more accurate than a cut off wheel, less air too.

Anyway, ground and fitted the new panel to the cowl, then started figuring out how to close the gaps in the bottom tray, to work the bend and roll around the clutch/brake bracket. The replacement panel must be generic for 64 through 67, the 65 – 66 have more room between the clutch support and the cowl, where the 67 had to be contoured around it.





I used the left over’s from the new patch panel, and cut out the front roll and enough to carry it over to where the original cowl drops down and bevels in. I cut the new piece to fit tight into the corner, then put a 45 and 45 break in the new piece, then peened the lower corner to allow it to roll into the floor of the new panel.



Got it close, then tacked in the new patch, once that was in place, I tacked it in thne added bevel to the patch to blend in the original cowl contour with the new contour. Once I had the contour patch tacked in, I used my door skin body hammer to ding it the panel rolls into each other and shape them in.






Not too bad for something you will never see. Still need to go back and knock the weld down with my die grinder, zip up any pin holes and then seal it. While I had it all open, I also took out all me E brake crap. Getting rid of that stuff and going with a hand brake. Anyone got any good advice on what is a good hand brake to adapt or just go with the Lokar?
 

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looks good Gydyup,

are you going to block off your fresh air or are you going to uce your vents, im doing the hole upper and lower cowl replacement and im thanking about blocking the fresh air off. im putting after market a/c and i live in fl a/c will always be on max.

 

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Discussion Starter #57
I am leaving them open, its a going to be a nice day only street car, drag car. No heat or AC, other than naturally ventilated.
Doing the whole thing may be the easy if not more expensive route, my panels were not to expensive, but its been time consuming.
Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #59
Just how I pictured it! Great work! Grind and prime then seam seal it and go racing!
Thanks, appreciate the great advice and support:bow:. Dinging this patch was the most fun of the project, love to make things.
 

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Discussion Starter #60
Cowl progress Oct 30
Updating the cowl progress, its been slow going, not a lot of time here lately.
When I left off, I had cut and replaced the driver side, having already finished the passenger side. But when I did the driver side, I didn’t like the finished product. As always, I try to retain as much original good metal as I can, sometimes this doesn’t work out for me. In this case on the driver side, I left the original front flange on the firewall, and made the cut and weld just inside the firewall. In the end, this resulted in some thin metal at that bend, when I put the cowl patch in, and started dressing the weld, I didn’t like what I saw with the thickness of the metals.

So I gutted the thing again, and bought a new panel, cut to fit, dinged the panel to fit around the clutch/brake bracket and fabbed a new piece to finish the panel variation from a 64/66 flat panel to a 67/68 curved panel.







Now its time to clean it, seal it, POR 15 and color coat it, then work the cap back on and plug weld the whole thing back together.
 
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