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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I got a 69 coupe with 250i6 3 speed auto, car came from Cali I live in Ohio.
I'm looking into putting a 302 stroked out to a 347, and changing over to a 4/5 speed. Very new into hotrodding, ultimately I want a setup that slams me back into my seat and burns rubber,
After all is said and done id like to choose between a TT or a supercharger very far down the road.
Thanks for all the replies ill check back in soon
 

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As far as trans update contact modern driveline. I used them for 5 speed conversion Support is extremely knowledgable You will get exactly what you need and if you have questions they can walk you through it. Hope that helps.


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Sounds Like a plan! Only small issue I forsee is How far "down the road" do you want to add that twin turbo or supercharger? If you build a lower compression engine now to handle the boost "down the road", you're going to be leaving quite a bit of power on the table, just meaning it likely wont be an optimum setup. Personally, I would just build (or buy) a budget stock stroke 302 for the time being, and save up and plan ahead for the boosted 347, or another idea would be to toss a mild 302 in for now, and build a 408 or 427 stroker out of a 351W. A properly built 302 with older 351W heads, a decent cam and intake and a 600/650 CFM 4 barrel will definitely sit you back in the seat and "burn rubber". (ever ride in a 5.0 90's Mustang? They were rated around 225HP or so) 5 speed, about a 3.73 trac-loc gear or so...I think you'd be happy with it. Roll with that for a while and save for the 347 stroker kit, aluminum heads, etc. Or a 351W can be found pretty cheaply in most junkyards still, or find someone parting out any mid-late 70's LTD or something like that.
 

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Thanks for the advice, I'll give them a call.

And how hard is it to rebuild an engine and stroke it myself (302)
Its not "hard" to do, but there are way too many steps involved to type it all out in a post (or 50). First of all you would have to remove you engine, disassemble it, and take the short block and heads to a machine shop and numerous things checked, such as do the cylinders need to be bored/how far, do the main bearing journals and caps need to be line bored/honed, have the block sonic checked for cracks/weaknesses/core shift, among other things. Then you would have to buy the stroker crankshaft/connecting rods/pistons of proper oversize if necessary, and select a camshaft, intake and carburetor that fits your needs (easier said than done), and decide if you want to use the factory cylinder heads (probably not the best choice, but doable) or buy aftermarket, if using the stock heads they will need to be checked and rebuilt with hardened exhaust valve seats (if needed depending on the year of your engine), etc. I suggest enlisting the help of someone trustworthy and knowledgeable that has assembled engines in the past. There are very close tolerances that need to be adhered to if you want an engine that has proper oil pressure and reliability. I'm just saying there's a LOT more to it than taking it apart and putting it back together. Sorry for the novel.

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You could most likely discuss it with your machine shop, and they can help you by assembling the short block properly (block, cam, crank, rods, pistons) and then you can reassemble the rest of it yourself.

Also you will need to think about what else in the drivetrain is going to fail potentially once you double or even maybe triple the horsepower if you plan to take it out and be rough on it like you're saying. A factory Ford T5 is likely not going to hold up to a properly built 347 stroker for very long, and other parts as well in the rear axle.
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