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Discussion Starter #1
Ok so I have a 1970 Torino 351 Cleveland and upgraded the top half from a stock 2bbl to 4bbl Eldlebrock 650 carb and intake manifold. Ever since then I've been creeping up on small issues. I have some bad compression in 2 valves so I just have her sitting, probably for way too long since I don't have the money to fix the block.

However, I'm trying to get it started again so I can sell it, I'll never have the money to fix it up, but I can't seem to get it started. The engine turns over, wants to start, if I dump a little fuel in the carb it fires up for a couple of seconds but then shuts off and the battery sits there and cranks. I've figured it's not getting fuel into the carb.

I've gone as far as taking the line off the carb, starting the car but no fuel comes up. I detached the line from the fuel pump and pressurized the tank to see gas pouring from the line. Hooked every back up and no go. I'm thinking there has to be a mechanical fuel pump issue but I barely know anything when it comes to classics or cars in general.

Any advice out there would be so helpful!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
you're on the right track. mechanical fuel pumps are probably $20.
Awesome, thanks! What about bypassing the mechanical altogether and just upgrading it to electrical? I can't even reach the top bolt of the fuel pump without taking some important pars off, lol.
 

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Hello,

I have a 351 Cleveland in a 66 F100. I upgraded it from carburated to EFI. However, in order to perform this swap 100% accurately, there were identifications that had to be made in order to ensure that the steps I took would be successful. Check this guys link below. It ain't fancy, but he makes key points regarding 351's. Knowing the specifics of the motor you have will contributesto the proper upgrade of the "top half". I'd hate to see you abandon a totally cool rig my friend! You just might end up wanting to keep your 70 Torino.

How to identify a 351 Cleveland
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Some really good information, thanks!

I have a another 71 Torino completely restored waiting for my son to come of age, the 70 just sits and decays sadly, I'd rather it go to someone who could afford to restore. With this money from it though I plan to use it for a deposit on a 2012-2015 Mustang Gt! Lol.
 

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Yes, you could just bypass it, if its less work. Just make sure to keep the pump below the tank, so that gravity will feed it.
(this isn't something i'd recommend if you were keeping it, but if you just need it to run so that you can sell it.)
low-end electrical pumps are cheap, also.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Ok great, thanks for the information!

Would you happen to know what PSI I would need?

Also, I read to check the fuel filter... I cannot find one. A friend of my installed the carb and intake, should there be one or does the Edlebrock have a built in one that I'm not seeing? (Sorry I'm sounding so car dumb but my dad knows all that car stuff and never really passed that knowledge on).
 

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Carburetors take between 3-5 psi.
I'm unsure which manual fuel pump you have - many of them have a metal canister attached, with a filter inside.
like this - Airtex® - Mechanical Fuel Pump

the canister can be either on top, on bottom, or it may not have a canister at all. if it doesn't have a canister, you'll have to follow the fuel line...and hope there's one there.
i don't think the Edelbrock carbs have one built in.

if you have a canister, but you're bypassing the mechanical pump, you'll want to add a filter.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Carburetors take between 3-5 psi.
I'm unsure which manual fuel pump you have - many of them have a metal canister attached, with a filter inside.
like this - Airtex® - Mechanical Fuel Pump

the canister can be either on top, on bottom, or it may not have a canister at all. if it doesn't have a canister, you'll have to follow the fuel line...and hope there's one there.
i don't think the Edelbrock carbs have one built in.

if you have a canister, but you're bypassing the mechanical pump, you'll want to add a filter.
Ok so I just went out and bought a mechanical fuel pump and it is a b* to even remove the old one because the power steering is in the way and a radiator hose. But I got it inuninstalled. Now I'm trying to put the new one in but it doesn't seem like it's going in very easy, or it's just loose I don't know if it's supposed to be like that. There is too much in the way to tell if the fuel eccentric rod is up or down, how can I tell it's going in or is there a way to get the eccentric in place so I can slide the push rod under it?
 

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Try rotating the engine over a little (big socket on the crankshaft nut, or bump it with the ignition).
You should be able to get the fuel eccentric to rotate out of the way a bit so that the installation is easier.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Okay great thanks! If the old pump came out smooth with no problem, if I tilt the pump arm in and it goes in just a smooth does that mean it's in place?
 

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yes- I would say that if you don't have to fight tooth and nail to get the bolts seated, you're in good shape.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Because the eccentric shouldn't have moved out of place if the engine is sitting and when I pulled the old pump out it just slid out, right? That's the way I'm looking at it. If it came out without trying to yank it it should slide in and under the eccentric fine...
 

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Correct - the eccentric is bolted down, its not going anywhere. You are likely just fighting the tension on the new pump arm.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Again, thanks so much for you help! I was able to install the fuel pump, I have fuel being supplied to the carb finally! It took awhile for it to fire up, and it finally did, however, it didn't last long. The engine would fire but then slowly sputter to a complete stop. The more I tried it the more I drained the battery. So we have fuel, we have ignition, now I can't seem to keep it running for more than 5 or more seconds. The first time i actually got it running I was able to go in the house, get my phone, come back while it's still running, give it some gas and it died. After that I've had no luck.
 

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That sounds like a fuel supply issue. I went back and read your first post, it says that you pressurized the tank, and had gas coming out of the line.
after reading that a couple of times, it hit me - you shouldn't need to pressurize the tank. when you pull the line off the fuel pump...it should come pouring out, from gravity alone.

does fuel come out of the line without pressurizing the tank?
 

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Discussion Starter #19
So I only pressurized the tank to see if there was any obstruction in the line from the tank to the fuel pump. When I disconnected the line from the pump to uninstall the pump no fuel poured out, I didn't have to cap the line with a screw or anything. When I first pulled the line off, same thing, untill I blew some compressed air in the tank then fuel came running out but stopped after the air left the tank. The new pump is definitely giving the carb some fuel, I can see it coming out of the jets looking down the carb when the car isn't running and I'm pressing on the throttle cable.
 

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argh - if you're only getting fuel out of the line when you pressurize your tank...there's an obstruction somewhere. it should pour out from gravity alone.
since you're just trying to sell it...maybe run the motor off an external gas can? your tank may be full of rust.
 
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