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Before I get under there and get this thing hung up can you pull the pan with the engine in place? Its a 2wd. I need to put a new oil pan gasket on it and I'd rather pull the pan out if I can.
 

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It looks like I will have to unbolt the mounts and jack the engine up to get the pan out so I can clean up under there. This is harder than putting in the reverse servo piston.
 

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IIRC, we pulled the shroud, maybe heater hoses (?) and right mount bolt, and jacked on the right side to avoid linkage and fuel disconnects and to get to the pump easier (R&R). I don't recall having issues with exhaust, auto trans, etc. It's been too long to recall clearly though. :confused:

David

EDIT: BTW - a buddy said he just jacked on the bellhousing and it pivoted on the two remaining mounts. I chicken-out on aluminum bells and used a vertical 2x4 on the right mount block flange to lift, and a 4x4 block wedged to the K-member to hold it there so I could then get to the pan all around. HTH
 

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Got my pan out. I used my engine crane and put a ratchet strap around the ac bracket close to the head. Its plenty strong considering the size and number of bolts on that thing. It put just the right amount of angle on the engine(higher on the driver side) that it would clear the oil pump pick up so I could eek the pan out from under there. I unbolted my fan from the fan clutch which gave me enough clearance from my shroud that I didn't have to remove it. I didn't have to un-do the cooler lines, radiator hoses, shifter linkage or gas line(its a rubber line) either. I scoured the inside of the pan, sanded it and masked it off for paint. 2 hours spent just doing that. Have to go get paint tomorrow. I think I used up my last Ford blue when I painted my air cleaner.
 

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I decided to try one of these new fangled one piece oil pan gaskets. It has metal inside and around the bolt holes to prevent crushing the gasket. You screw these plastic peg's in the 1/2 inch holes and the gasket clips over those to hold it in place. You then slip t he pan up on there and these plastic studs also clip the pan in place so you can keep the gasket lined up while you put the bolts in. I hope it works.

I also found the source of my mysterious, slow coolant disappearance. It looks like I have a very small leak somewhere in the radiator. It is just so much fun laying on the creeper putting oil pan bolts in while coolant slowly drips into your face. Maybe I will go ahead and invest in a new aluminum radiator although my truck has always run on the low side of normal. It is looking like the aluminum radiators are now cheaper than the old copper/brass ones.
 

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I decided to try one of these new fangled one piece oil pan gaskets. ... I hope it works.
... It is looking like the aluminum radiators are now cheaper than the old copper/brass ones.
The 1-piece steel-core rubber gaskets are slick, but keep two things in-mind:

  • Dabs of silicone sealer must still be used in the corners at the timing cover and the rear main to prevent seepage at the parting lines and corners. Just refer to the directions.
  • They work to seal really well IF using a cast aluminum pan (the original application for the design) or IF it's a sheet steel pan, the rails are perfectly straight. If it has been over-torqued on the past, the steel spacers will hold the pan out and you'll get seepage in the spans between the bolts.
While I always straighten gasket surfaces anyway, it's especially important with these to work right. The little plastic clip studs are slick in under-car situations.

The aluminum rad's are a really good deal these days. Just be sure you get the spec's on the core to verify it's what you think it is. Some are single-row cheapies, some still use round-tube, and many do not have louvered fins for heat transfer. Generic fit racing types are the best deal, as the 'custom' or 'direct-fit' are big money for a couple brackets.

Also verify if the dimensions are just the core, or overall, so you have no surprises in either mounting, or frustration getting the shroud to fit. Electric fans are popular because of the shroud issues. Contrary to popular opinion, is it often difficult to get electrics to cool as well as shrouded mechanical.

David

Even new, stamped steel pans are not perfect. Note the dark areas in the pan rails below, indicating I need to do a bit more straighteneing with the hammer and dolly:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I tapped it back into shape and checked for straight and level on the sides.

I didn't know I should put the silicone in the corners and I didn't do that. There was nothing in the instructions about it and the parts place owner said he installed one on his 347 and didn't put any silicone. It is not leaking so far and I've driven it around plenty enough for it to heat up. I know the yokes(end seals) on the old steel pans can stretch out of shape but mine still look good and tight. Hopefully I won't get any oil seeping out.

I ordered a Champion 3 row aluminum radiator. I've only read any bad reviews regarding the old Dodge Darts. I know these are a cheap knock off most likely out of China but hopefully it will do fine on my old truck.

It should be in this week.
 

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I didn't know I should put the silicone in the corners and I didn't do that. There was nothing in the instructions about it and the parts place owner said he installed one on his 347 and didn't put any silicone. It is not leaking so far and I've driven it around plenty enough for it to heat up. I know the yokes(end seals) on the old steel pans can stretch out of shape but mine still look good and tight. Hopefully I won't get any oil seeping out. ...
I should have been clear about which gaskets and which pans. If you are using a stock 1-piece rubber gasket, the factory used silicone at the ends. Aftermarket need it as well for security, with the only exception I've found with Fel-Pro and FMS if it is the correct type for the correct year. There are two basic versions.

Oil pans before 1986 had sharper corners at the timing cover and rear cap corners for use with cut gaskets. These tend to leak with the newer-style rubber gaskets, and little dabs of silicone helps. The clue is if the gasket has a relief cutout for a block dipstick ('86+), it will likely leak with an earlier pan type. Most of the cheaper "one size fits all" are this type and need silicone. Fel-Pro and FMS (and perhaps others by now) make versions for both early and late styles. It would seem you were given the right one. If the correct type is used, no silicone is needed for zero leaks. :tup:

David
 
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