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This Thunderbird was my father's car. He was very proud of his car. My father and I gave his car a transplant. It originally was a automatic v6. My father bought a wiring harness, A9L ecu, t5 transmission, 3" exhaust. 302 with trick flow intake 70mm, my father said it has a mild cam. 42 lb fuel injectors, and a 75mm mass air flow sensor calibrated for 42lb injectors and a new posi-traction axle. So it's a 88 Thunderbird/89 mustang 5.0. so my father called it a Pegasus. Are friend said it's not a Pegasus it's a thunderchicken. LMAO. My father was a veteran and has kiddney failure. At 24years old. He is the strongest person I ever new. Never once complained. He just passed away 3/22/19. He gave me pegasus.love you dad
  1. I would like to have some help or knowledge. With the t5 transmission. The car had a bad vibration. Dad and I thought it was a u joint. But I found out it was a bearing in the t5. The bearing has came out of it's seat. So the hole main shaft was vibrating. Here's a photo.
  2. Can anyone help me please? It would be very appreciated. Thank you. In loving memory of my best friend, my awesome dad. Raymond Allen Harris.
 

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That bearing is held in by the extension housing, it is only out of place because the extension housing is not there.

It is rare for a transmission (any kind) to cause a vibration.

I would be looking at U-joints and/or driveshaft angles before blaming the trans.
 

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1965 Ford Falcon Futura
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I had a vibration in my trans. It turned ot to be the bearing in the tail housing. Roger
 

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Same here. But the eating has backed out of the transmission case.
Yes, but galax said the bearing is held in place by the tail housing itself. When the housing is installed the bearing will be held in place.
 

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I'm not sure how the bearing was held in. I took my car to a trans shop.The reason the bearing was bad, was the guy who built my aod and installed it used the yoke from the old C-4 that was it my car. It was way to short. It only went in short amount,where the yoke for the AOD went in twice as far as the yoke for the C-4. I had a new drive shaft made up with the AOD yoke and the rear bearing replaced. Works great now.Good luck Roger
 

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The bearing that I'm talking about is pressed into the rear of the tail housing where the yoke slids into the trans.
 

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The bearing that I'm talking about is pressed into the rear of the tail housing where the yoke slids into the trans.
That is a bushing, and yes, that will cause a vibration, esp since you said the slip yoke was too short.
The vibration you felt was more driveshaft related as the driveshaft would "whip" since the yoke was not properly supported by the bushing.

I have been in the transmission repair business for over 45 years and I have never seen or had an INTERNAL trans part cause a vibration.
The exception would be an out-of-balance torque converter, on an automatic,
but that only happens when the torque rebuilder doesn't do his job properly, and the vibration happens after a fresh install.
Torque converters don't "go out of balance" and shake while in use.

...and again, INTERNAL trans parts, automatic OR manual trans, don't usually cause vibration...
unless there has been some kind of catastrophic failure inside the trans,
and if that's the case.... you have other problems, the vibration is secondary.

Bad bearings in a standard trans will cause noise, growling, rumble type of noise that could be mistaken for a vibration.
 

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I stand corrected, The part I called a bearing is really a bushing. The trans guy told me the bushing was damaged from the yoke being the wrong yoke.Roger
 
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