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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just have a couple of quick questions.
Today I was asked what the advantage of a aftermarked billet distributer would be over a stocker, and I could not give a good answer, because I really don't know. Does it have something to do with that an aftermarked transfers more spark power or longer spark duration than a stocker?
Second, with an auto C-4 trans, can it be shifted from 1st, to 2nd, and then to drive for third, so I could pick my shift points manually? Or would I just break itI do not want to try it and ruin my new tranny.
Thanks for any help

Matt
 

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After market distributors offer a number of benefits over stock units. The shaft is spinning more stable (less spark fluctuation) because of finer operating bearings, the shaft also is more stable, able to handle your oil pump shaft.

As for manually shifting, unless you constantly take it OVER the redline of your motor, you should have no problem. But, also I would recommend that if you are going to shift at real high rmp's, make sure your transmission is built right and you may consider a tranny blanket as extra insurance. Though most manufacturers say their parts are bullet proof, I have seen a few explode, resulting in some nasty injuries (toes gone, nerve damage in legs, etc).

There will be a few disagreeing with me and that is their god given right. This is my honest opinion
(I sound like a politician!)

Fred

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There is NO substitution for Cubes
1954 Mercury Pick-up Blown 525 BBF

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Blown54 on 5/27/02 12:16pm ]</font>
 

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The biggest advantage that an aftermarket distributor has is the adjustability. They are very easy to change the timing curves. Initial and toal advance, when its all in by, how fast the advance is, etc. All very easy to do.

It's a semi-major deal to recurve a stock distributor. On my MSD distributor I can choose from 32 different curve combinations and change from one to another in about 3 minutes. The whole advance mechanism is right under the rotor. To do the same recurve on a duraspark or points distributor requires a total teardown.

Later,

David Cole
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thanks for the info...What would the advantage be of "Re-curving" your dist? I have no idea what that means. Is it the same as adjusting the retard/advance by moving the dist either direction?
I think my new engine is not running to potential and I think I need to get it tuned up/timing messed with. Please lay out all of the info you have on this subject. I need to learn a lot.
THANKS!
Matt
 

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Matt,recurving the distributor is adjusting the springs and weights inside the dist to best suit your engine combination.It governs how fast or slow the mechanical advance comes in.The idea is to bring the mech advance in as quick as you can without the engine pinging from too much spark too early.This will give you more power earlier.If the curve is too slow the power will come in later.This is different to what you mention in moving the dist in which is setting the initial timing. You can do a bit of testing yourself to see where the total timing is in with a timing light and get an idea of how quick the curve currently is..The idea of the MSD billet dist's is you can do all the adjustments yourself based on the recommendations in the instructions they give you.If you have a stock type dist you need to have it run up on a dist machine to have it set up.A billet dist can be altered to suit your engine if you make any changes later..Hope that it explains a bit...
 
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