Ford Muscle Cars Tech Forum banner

1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,059 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited by Moderator)
I wanted to get rid of the rubber bushings strut rods and got to solid/mechanical mount adjustable rods.
Two things on a Mustang that are loosy goosy, well three if you count the steering box, are the camber eccentrics and caster settings with the rubber mounts. You can align it, and it takes very little to knock it out of alignment with these two substandard suspension components.


My man Dennis put solid adjustable strut rods on when he upgraded to the 67 front under his 65, normally when Dennis does something, I pay attention. He is the one who turned me onto Rose hill and Open tracker...


Lots of sources out there if you want to spend 300 to 500 bucks. Daze has a neat way of making them, if you have a 65-66 and some of the specialized parts needed for the clevis, and TIME to make it . Not sure if I want to use the cast steel clevis on this build though as Dennis noted, they take a lot of abuse on a drag car. On a street car, more than fine.


Rosehill performance in Texas has the best price on them, 250 for the whole kit for all early Mustangs, except the 67 which has a unique one off lower control arm bolt pattern, of course!


I generally try to make my own stuff anyway, unless the time trumps the cost, and in this case it was darn close. Daze method certainly takes more time..so I did a little of both. I picked up the frame ends from Rosehill for 125 bucks, picked up a couple of swedge rods from Speedway around 30 bucks, and made my own LCA endlink adjusters. Daze method of turning the endlink down and threading it is the way to go, but on the 67 and up, they flatten the rod and you cant do that. Again, you either gotta by the link or make it. Except the 67, they don't make the endlink for that year kit. You CAN replace the 67 LCA with a 68, and your good to go, but I have just bought all new front end parts, so I saw the additional cost of LCAs and labor as another driver to make my own links vice replacing LCAs.
For the LCA link, I used flat 3/8 bar, scribed the center lines, laid out the bolt pattern for the LCA, drilled those...then drilled a series of 5/8 holes down the link end, and used a cutoff wheel on a angle grinder to form a 5/8 slot.


I took all my measurements for the layout from my stock ones and off Daze site, I cut the head off a 5/8 grade 8 bolt, used a 1/8th slotted alum flat to center the 5/8 bolt in the 3/8 plate, tacked it, then used levels and calipers to center it, and tacked and checked, then welded it up. I put a steel collar on the end of the link just to cap off the link and stiffen the bolt to link area.


I measured the distance from the rear LCA bolt to tie rod stop and angle of the stop on the stock rods, lopped those off the stock rods and ground to fit and welded the tie rod stops onto the new ones. You could easily use a cut off 3/4 bolt. I have them on, look awesome, now just to align it ....again.


Lesson learned on these, I opted for the lighter Chrome molly swedge rods. They don't have flats on it for turning with a wrench, so I may take them to have a nut tiged to one end...but buying the swedge, look for GOOD ones, but also having flats to turn aka Caltrac bars.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,478 Posts
I just saw this link and it's got me concerned. You took a lot of care to strengthen the 5/8 grade 8 bolt and that's great, but what is concerning, and i've brought it up to others who have gone the same route before, is that you're welding mild steel to hardened alloy steel (the grade 8 bolt) with mild steel MIG wire I assume (ER 70S-6 for example). This is generally not a good idea. Very brittle crystalline structure (martensite) can form in those welds especially if the weld cools too quickly. You have a lot of power in that car so be careful!
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top