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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
'67 Galaxy XL with the 390 2 barrel.

The problem i've been having is hesitation on part throttle take off. if i floor it out of a light, all is well, but when i take off gently, it stumbles/hesitates. Is adjusting the points what i need to be doing? What about timing advance? Am i on the right track?

I've found how to adjust the points, but is there some sort of specification to it, like a gap? I've searched like crazy and I'm so lost with this..

How exactly do i go about adjusting/advancing the timing? i tried loosening the distributor mounting bolt, but it wouldnt turn like my other car does. I have my timing light hooked up, just having trouble actually CHANGING the timing!

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: dijital357 on 7/4/06 1:39am ]</font>
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ok... and so im sure to make myself sound like a complete noobie, how do i adjust the dwell?

I have a dwell meter...if i can get it to work right.

Thanks a million.
 

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1st thing do you have a book? second thing Dwell Meter? (Very Cheap Tools if you know where to buy them) OK well then we will do it the old manual way. Take off dist cap, hook up push button remote starter switch to starter solinoid on fender well (No starter switch?) ok get an assistant, pull coil wire from coil then remove cap notice the distributor cam with 8 high points? (these are called point lobes) good have assistant crank (bump start) the engine until one of the lobes is centered on the point block that rides the lobes (high point) get a feeler guage and check gap (see spec for point gap or call local autoparts store for spec) out of wack? ok loosen the screw(s) just enough that you can move the points closer or further away until you get the required setting, tighten then recheck (sometimes they will move a bit when tightening and you will have to readjust) dwell meter will give you a more perfect setting as you can the the gap or dwell while the car is running. As for the dist not moving, it is probably gummed up with varnish from being in that position for a long time, you can try soaking around the dist to block area with penetrant for a few hours then grasp the dist and slowly rotate it back and forth. Set dwell (point gap) first then timing, also disconnect vacuum advance BEFORE setting timing. Last after all have been set and adjusted would be carb adjustment and definetly check the fuel squirt that also will cause a hesitation as well as a vacuum leak or vacuum advance on the dist.
Gary
 

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The distributor should turn when the bolt is loostened, check to see if you have something in the way. Once I tried to turn my didtributor and it wouldn't turn far enough to time it where I wanted it, I foung the clamp from the small hose between the intake and the water pump blocking it from turning, I had to rotate the clamp just a little to allow movement. I'd try initial timing between 10 to 14 degrees and see what works best make sure you don't have a vacume leak and unplug and block off your vacume advance to set it. You can use a match book to set your points gap I can't remember the exact number, ssems like .017 comes to mind. I was running a NOS distributor some one gave me but finally got tired of poins and put a new MSD ready to run in, you can get one of those or a Mallory. If you want to look stock but loose the points, you can put in a Pertronics.
 

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a friend of mine told me that you can adjust the points until the spark is the bluest for the best setting while bumping the ingnition or using a handheld starter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
OK well i adjusted the points, and they may not be exact, but they are close enough. Got my distributor to turn, and man was that timing off. I set it to about 12 degrees BTDC, drove it... and the hesitation is GONE. No knocking either. Im running 93 octane in her.

That car goes now!

She seems to be running rather rich though... any suggestions about that?

Thanks for everyone's help. I love this board.......
 

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sure. Open the choke flaps....


Turn in your air fuel screws a tiny bit, or until it runs rough then open it 1/2 turn from there. Do that on both sides.

Then, if that don't help the overall fuel consumption, kit and jet your carb. The brass and metering rod's in the carb will wear out over time.

FE
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
OK, i did that.... i even used a vacuum gauge. Better, but still kinda running rich- smells like my lawnmower, and blowing the blue/grey smoke at idle. Guess i need to rebuild my carb at some point....

or is this normal?
 

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Can you see what your valve seals look like? You may be smoking due to oil going down the valves or a leaking intake.
 

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what do the tips of the spark plugs look like ???? If they are gunked up with oil you got leaky valve seals. does it use up a bunch of oil???
 

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You guys must have newer or better equipment than I do, for my autos never could get away with the sort of point's gap that you're citing. I have a bit more than 3/4 million miles on one car, nearly 1/3 millon on another, and yet another has gone through four speedometers since I have owned it, and no telling how many miles that adds up to.

But generally on two of the engines the lobes to the ignition points are so worn down, they just cannot take any gap beyond about .010" to .012" or there never would be one cylinder firing. I have to set the dwell angle with a meter, to make it run smooth. I always aim for about middle 30's for dwell angle for once the engine it reved up just a tad, it then goes on up into the low 40's.

And then you set the initial advance.

Also, depending upon how many miles are on the ol' 390, hesitation is not that easy to rid of. When it begins on my olde motors, quickest and cheapest thing is to up the advnce 2-3 degrees. But that is only a quicky fix.

I have found oft' times it is the timing chain which is pooping out. Remove the fuel pump, and stick you finger in the hole, touching the side of the chain. Then wiggle it around and see if there isn't too much play. My experience has been that the big V-8's stretch the chain around 60-80 thou miles. Yank it off and install a new one and the engine changes tone then.

Wm.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Well guys, the freakin stumble is sorta back. i guess i jumped the gun in thinking it was gone. The car really goes with my timing fixed, but it still stumbles right off idle.

If i floor it out of a stoplight, everything is fine. if i just drive normal away from a light, it hesitates/stumbles for a second. Seems like it might get a little worse when going around corners?

I talked to a teacher at school- and he says its most likely the accelerator pump(s). that was his first guess. His second is that the timing chain could be streched (i'll put my timing light back on to see if it bounces around). I think it could be a combination of both. Do those things sound reasonable? i believe they were discussed before. guess im probably in for a dreaded carb rebuild (scared).

just to vent:
This car leaks oil like a seive too- all the seals were just replaced!! killin me... Honestly im feeling a little discouraged. i've had the car for just a few weeks now, and its overwhelming. pretty off topic- i got an estimate to pull the dings, fix the rust (requires fabrication) and get her re-painted. I was told to get her looking "pretty good" it would cost like $10k.
. Guess i'd better start saving my money......
 

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Your teacher may be a bit on the reserved side in his opinion. How many miles on this engine? I don't see it mentioned. What interests me is the mention of a higher than normal initial advance. This weekend, if wanting to eliminate one item above, check the timing chain. Just remove the fuel pump, then stick your finger in the hole, and it should touch the chain. The book says to replace the chain when the deflection or slack exceeds 1/2 inch. Usually this occurs after 50,000 miles. At around 75,000 miles it gets into the 3/4 inch or more range. You can estimate the deflection by touching the edge of the chain, then going in and out. Otherwise, bend up a old coat hanger and try measuring it with that.

Then again, just at what RPM is the engine idling at? If the big number ignition advance causes it to jump up to about 900-1000 RPM, then that idea did little good. At this range, the carburetor has begun using the secondary circuit, and could either bypass or minimally be using the idle circuit. Besides California emmissions, this is one reason which I do not like to add in advance to cure a problem. First see about enriching the idle mixture, then lowering the overall engine RPM at idle by slacking off on the air adjustment.

If the carburetor pump circuit is working at all, it may be of concern, but for now not worth the effort of rebuilding a whole carburetor. With the modern gasolines, the pump may be clean and still working. On the Autolite design carburetor, there is a little button shaped item usually orange or red colored, which acts as a check valve for the pump circuit. It usually does not deteriorate, but look at it good to see that there isn't anything trapped under the edge. Usually no reason to remove it.

I found that if the distributor is pooped, or soon to be, the slack and worn parts inside will not permit setting to dwell angle as shown in book. On worn distributors, I aim for the higher dwell angle figure, at idle. For once you add in a 1000 RPM to the engine, it usually lessens significantly. Going from 34 degrees to 29 is not unusual for a worn distributor. Worn lobes and bushings will cause this. Setting gap on ignition points only applies to brand new, shiney ones. For once they get used a bit, they tend to pit, and setting the gap, expecting the dwell angle to then be perfect is fantasy. The pits, holes, lumps and bumps usually then give a gap about .002" greater than noted. Thus as has been noted here already, use a simple dwell gauge, and check at near specified idle.

Then yet another simple question. Have you attached a vacuum gauge to the engine yet? and what does that read. If you have like 10-14 inches of vacuum, then none of the above ideas will apply, until the leak is determined. For your engine cannot begin to handle any of these fixes, until the gauge reads better than about 16-17 inches. The higher (usually) the better.


Wm.
 
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