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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Guys, I've got a 66 fairlane with the stock alternator and regulator hook up and was wondering what's the advantage of a one wire hook up? I was looking at alternators from Tuff Stuff and see several types, more amps and some with internal regulators and some with out.

So what happens when your out on a trip and that special alt goes bad and the local parts store doesn't have a replacement.....you stay over night and have one shipped in or convert back to the stock set up? Who wants to carry a spare alternator around just incase?

I know this can apply to several other parts on our modified rides so what do you do?
 

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Go to madelectrical.com & look how easy it is to use the GM CS series of Alt.s on your early fairlane, its a great swap & if you look up the #'s you can pull a 100 amp. alt, from your local wreckers
Plus, they;re very easy to replace anywhere!
Good info at Mad site for all kinds of electrical upgrades from dash to headlights.
 

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I just use the Ford '94+ alternators (known as 3G or 6G) as they can be run 1 wire, or 2-wire if you want a working dash light. It helps to know something failed before it just quits running. ;) More power and more efficient than even higher rated GM types at normal driving speeds, bolts right on without adapter spacers or bracket mods, and available at any parts store or wrecking yard. Oh - and it's FORD. :D To be fair, the GM swap was a good one over the older 1G and 2G Ford designs - until the 3G versions came out. Now the opposite is true, but like any long-time practice, it takes a while for new info to get around. In this case, almost 20 years, but the 3G swaps are now the standard for classic Fords. FYI, new 130 amp 3G alternators are on Fleabay for $80, and about $110 to $140 for typically unnecessary 160 to 200 amp versions.

As far as non-stock mods to cars, whenever I do a mod, I write the info on a sheet that I throw into a Ziplock bag along with the registration, insurance and parts warranty papers in the car. So, it looks like:
Alternator - 1995 Mustang 5.0L
Front disc brakes - 2002 Mustang GT
Rear disc brakes - 1988 Lincoln LSC
Master cylinder - 1974 Maverick 302 manual
Radiator fan - 2000 Contour 2.5L dual
Transmission - 1998 Mustang 3.8L T5
Clutch - 1993 Mustang King Cobra 10.5"
Starter - 1996 Explorer 5.0L
Headlights - 50/90W H4 and 100W H1
... and so on. HTH

David
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
PSIG, I'm guessing my 66 stock type is a 1G or 2G so the newer 94+ G3-G6 would be better for sure. You said the two wire one is for a dash light if used.....where do you hook up that second wire? I'm guessing some wire off the old regulator? If you have a volt meter gage wouldn't that tell you your alternator has gone bad just like a dash light would?

I think I'll check into a 94+ G3 model off a 95 Mustang and one more question....what do you do with the old regulator wire harness hook up?
 

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you can either do what i did which was completely tear out the old regulator and just run the correct wires to the starter cylinoid. or you can keep the regulator on the car and just unplug it and tuck the wires under the battery tray or something (also another option of going right back to a normal externally regulated alt in case of an emergency failure)
 

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PSIG, I'm guessing my 66 stock type is a 1G or 2G so the newer 94+ G3-G6 would be better for sure. You said the two wire one is for a dash light if used.....where do you hook up that second wire? I'm guessing some wire off the old regulator? If you have a volt meter gage wouldn't that tell you your alternator has gone bad just like a dash light would?

I think I'll check into a 94+ G3 model off a 95 Mustang and one more question....what do you do with the old regulator wire harness hook up?
Stock '66 is 1G. A decent design, but fairly weak from that time period of few power accessories. The 1980s saw 2G and the GM swap was popular because it was better, but had a tendency to catch stuff on fire. While more powerful, both the 2G and the GM series required higher RPMs to make rated power. This is why under-drive pulley kits were popular with racers and deep-geared street cars, as the factory sized the pulleys to spin them fast to make the necessary power at lower speeds, and wasted power at higher RPMs.

Ford went overboard to fix issues and prove they could make a superior alternator with the 3G - and they did. Spinning it slower, the 3G could make more power at idle than the 2G or GMs at highway speeds. They had a winner, but like all things new, it was very expensive at the time (much like 6G is now - even better but still expensive). So now you know more than you wanted to about the history of Ford's designs.

The 3G comes out-of-the-box as a standard 3-wire hookup. The wires are the BATT+ cable, a voltage sensing wire, and the red/grn for your dash light. The V-sense wire should go to the starter relay to monitor system voltage most accurately, but many have found simply attaching it to the BATT+ stud works fine. Now it's a 2-wire. If you don't want a dash light, you just don't connect the red/grn wire to your old red/grn wire. That makes a 1-wire hookup. Stock.

I strongly suggest you take the time to do the 2-wire hookup, as having a warning that there is an issue can prevent you from being stranded somewhere with no warning and a dead battery, or an overheated car because you threw the belt and didn't know it until you noticed steam clouds. It's only one wire. I'd take the 30 seconds and hook it up where the old wire ends at the regulator connector, even if you have a volt meter or ammeter.

You can trash the old regulator and much of the old wiring. Or, I left everything there on my last car so it looked 'stock' at a glance - it just didn't function and was there for show. Super-easy hookup too. I never had a single person catch-on that it was a conversion. Do a search on this forum for articles and several threads about conversions so you're comfy with the process. You can also post a copy of your schematic, and we can mark it up to show all the stuff you can rip out if you want to do it that way. Have fun!

David
 
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