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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, I wanted to see if anyone has used that Alumaloy fluxless aluminum welding rod stuff.

I just scored an intake for a good price, but someone got a little grinder happy while porting on 1 port, now its bigger than the gasket. Im looking at ways to fill it, and came across Alumaloy.

It looks basically like a low heat brazing operation. Anybody use this stuff and have opinions?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I welded aluminum with mig in school, but thats not available to me now.

This stuff is like a brazing rod, you just use a propane or mapp gas torch and the rod looks like it flows pretty well. Theres no actual "melting" of the Aluminum base metal. The link has interesting videos.

http://www.alumaloy.net/

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: ChicoB on 3/18/06 2:58am ]</font>
 

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Utter junk. Tried to use it to repair a broken tailshaft housing. The stuff just crumbled and balled up. Sure it'll braze 2 soda cans together, but where in life is that actually usefull?
 

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I tried it and it sucked. Tried to fix an intake, but just kept falling off and I cleaned and roughed up the part really well. All it had was a little hole I wanted to repair. Maybe I'm doing something wrong, but the video sure makes it look like it works great.
 

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Aluminum is not like brass where you can get good adhesion with only one surface melting, if the two aluminum parts arent flown into eachother it's not going to stick for shart. that's why yo usee so much milling and grinding after an aluminum repair, flow it both directions and put a lot more material back then smoothe everything back into shape on a mill or with a grinder....
 

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OK everybody; I have used alumaloy to repair many boat props and resold them without any complaints. It takes practice, but it works and is as strong as they say. You have to heat the piece you are trying to repair to melt the alumaloy. hint-- Mapp gas works better especially if the repair is bigger as in aluminum head
 

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If I've learned anything trying to weld aluminum, its that you have to preheat. heat the entire area you're going to be welding (with an arc or a torch) and then start pooling your aluminum. If you don't, just like FE said, you'll have little balls of aluminum. Its kind of like when you drop solder on a countertop. It cools so quickly that it doesn't adhere, it just turns into a ball of metal.

I don't know if you can get it hot enough with a torch. We tried brazing an aluminum fan blade once, and we just couldn't get it hot enough to take the brass. The little ball of metal would freeze on contact.
 

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I bought this stuff about 6 months ago from http://www.alumaloy.org I have fixed so many things around my house with this stuff. lol I think the company owns a couple websites that sell similar products to repair metals because they also sell this stuff called Castaloy. I used it to repair my engine block from an older car I was restoring. I wish I would have taken before pictures so I could have shared them.
 

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I welded aluminum with mig in school, but thats not available to me now.

This stuff is like a brazing rod, you just use a propane or mapp gas torch and the rod looks like it flows pretty well. Theres no actual "melting" of the Aluminum base metal. The link has interesting videos.

Alumaloy home

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: ChicoB on 3/18/06 2:58am ]</font>

A couple things come to mind. First, if there is no melting of the base material, how on earth are you going to "weld" it? Technically that is what welding is-melting of the base materials and adding a filler material. Also, if both the base and filler are not melted, the weld quality "will" be garbage. It would be like soldering-and I think about everyone knows that soldering is not as strong as an actual weld. Sure you can solder two pieces of copper together but they'll also break AT the joint with very little force because you still have TWO pieces of base material joined by a filler-where melting both bases and adding the filler of the same material would be MUCH stronger. Another thing to consider is that aluminum requires a ton of heat to actually get the metals to melt/fuse. This is due to heat dissipation-Aluminum dissipates the heat so quickly that you normally have to "turn up" the heat quite a bit more than you would with, say, carbon steels, Stainless materials of most alloys, Titanium, etc. A 180A TIG is usually only good to about 3/16" thick aluminum, if that is any clue. IMO, a propane or MAPP torch will not get aluminum hot enough to provide good penetration-most of the time it won't get al warm enough to actually melt it. They'll melt aluminum cans and it'll weld those because they're so thin and thats why you see sometimes the guys who sell this garbage welding cans together at shows, etc. And another thing-with a torch, when you melt the aluminum material, you are introducing air into the molten metal-which creates oxides and pits. Not good for strength. Thats one reason when welding aluminum an inert gas is used (Argon, Helium, and sometimes mixtures of Ar/He and other gases). Keeps the air out (and also helps arc stability in MIG, TIG applications).

Might see some guy at a show making it work but I've tried all different kinds and never had any luck with any of them. Even tried an arc welding rod made of aluminum-haha-another waste of money. If you want to weld aluminum, get a good MIG machine or TIG machine-and go from there. Better quality welds altogether especially with TIG processes. I once built a pressure washer frame entirely out of aluminum with a "cheapie" Weld-Pak 100 Lincoln machine using Argon and al wire. Came out nice-but had to turn up the heat all the way and turn the wire speed up to 100%. The machine just was not hot enough but it worked. Most of the base metals on that project were around 1/8" thickness. Was used for many years as a drag strip battery charger. An old two stroke lawn boy engine with a pulley and a little 40A tractor alternator-whole thing weighed 24 lbs total.
 

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From my experience, it can work, but is very touchy about the base alloy and super cleanliness. The higher-grade the aluminum part is, the harder it is to get it to flow and bond. Also, I found (as in all aluminum work) you must use a dedicated SS brush that goes near nothing but aluminum. Prep well, get it hot, then brush immediately before adding wire. Good luck.

It was funny one day at a demo booth. A previous customer brought an alternator housing that was cracked to the demonstration guy. He had spent all his rods trying to get it to work with only partial success and wanted to see the sales rep do it right. The sales rep tried 4 or 5 times and finally got it right (ugly but right) using about $80 worth of rods trying. And HE knew what he was doing. He made no more sales that day... LOL.
... Was used for many years as a drag strip battery charger. An old two stroke lawn boy engine with a pulley and a little 40A tractor alternator-whole thing weighed 24 lbs total.
LOL! I built the same setup in the early '80s - the ugly old green Lawn Boy 2-stroke mower engine and a Mopar alternator. But we stole my kid's undersized little red wagon for a cart. She outgrew it anyway. :rolleyes: Worked great and everybody borrowed it...:D

David
 

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Ive used the Alumaloy welding rod with some sucess. But the salesman lied when he said that you could use a propane torch. I never could get the aluminum hot enough with it but once I broke out the Acetelene torch it worked good enough. Who ever said the thing about the clean sst wire brush is right you have to clean it after you heat it then get the base hot and melt the rod. I used it on a Motorcycle case that a friend laid over and knocked a hole in a non fluid area.

I would not buy it again though. TIG is the way to go with Alum.
 
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