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Discussion Starter #1
I have read that oil helps prevent this. I'm having a big problem with it on my rocks as well as my carbides. I'm wondering what sort of oil I need. Will WD 40 work?
 

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I only used carbide cutters and would run them in wax first and keep wax on them. Like candle or sealing wax. I worked well for me
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Since my compressor burned up I've been running a roto zip as a die grinder. It does not have a variable speed control and it really zips. I've read that a variable light control will work so maybe I can slow it down some.

I probably should just invest in a new dremel that will handle the larger carbide bits. I have a small one already.
 

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cut slower or lighter. u are melting the aluminum
That's the real answer, and the lube answers are an attempt to keep it cooler. I (usually) don't use any coolant or lube with my carbide cutters on cast aluminum and my cutters stay clean, but my RPM are never "maximum", and my cuts are deep.

I had no issues with buildup using an air die grinder, but the air exhaust was forward at the work. When I used electric for some jobs, I had issues (even with lube) until I built a speed controller from a dimmer switch, outlet, gang box and cord. You quickly find a speed that is high enough to not chatter, but allows a smooth deliberate cut. Between the slightly slower speed and aggressive cuts, the bit gets hot, but the aluminum doesn't heat as much, avoiding galling and buildup. HIgh-speed light cuts tend to heat both the bit and the aluminum

If you can't control the speed, you might try clamping or banding a small compressed air hose or tube on your tool, aimed directly at your cutting area with generous flow. That may keep the temperatures low enough. Lubricants can help, but holy cow - what a mess if you can avoid it. Also, once it starts, it's hard to stop as aluminum sticks to the cutter (micro) even after cleaning, and it wants to stick more to itself when hot again. A vicious cycle. HTH

David
 

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My neighbor has a performance machine shop and he uses liquid hand soap as a lube. Dunk the bit in it and then grind. I personally can't tell you if its any better or worse than the oil based lubes but I know that is all he uses and he does a dozen or so heads a year.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The variable light control did not have the desired effect for some reason. This is aggravating trying to do all the work with my cordless drill. The aluminum on this intake is hard.
 

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Eastwood sells something called 'Grinders Grease'. It's a white wax substance. It's a solid at room temperature, and melts when you stick a warm burr in it. I just stick the burr down in there and blip the throttle to get some on it. Work pretty good! A container of this stuff goes a LONG way.

Read the reviews at the link.

Grinders Grease


 

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Discussion Starter #12
Looking at 1/4", variable speed, electric die grinders. They are not cheap. I might be better off just fixing my air compressor because I have a few air driven die grinders. My air has to be fixed eventually anyway.

I am going to try some different suggestions given here with the rotozip tool but it does not have a variable speed and it really zips along at something like 18,000 rpms. Maybe a light touch and the use of some sort of lubricant will allow me to finish this up. One can hope.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I wired my make shift rotozip grinder back up and got out the WD 40. It is working great. I am using it fairly often on the carbide cutter. It is also allowing me to use a much lighter touch with the grinder on the intake. I can feel on the grinder when it is about time to apply some more. I may actually be able to finish all this now.
 

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yeah, grocery stores sell blocks of paraffin for canning purposes, they work great for disk/belt sanders too just a touch on the running abrasive and it lasts a lot longer, not messy... just watch for buildup, it can burn in the disc guards.

most abrasive supply houses sell cardboard tube sticks of wax too for grinders/sanders, stays cleaner, just grinds away the cardboard as you use it...
 

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Just saw this stuff used at a local Fab'ing shop & they tell me its just super to stop build up
Castrol "stick wax" comes in a big tube.
 
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