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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In 61 and 63, Ford made true baseline cars with painted window frames (Fairlane and Ford 300.) In 62. the cheapest full sized car you could buy was the Galaxie. Why didn't they build a base car in 62? Did they intend for the Fairlane to take up the slack?
 

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According to my 1962 Ford car and truck prices and specifications book second edition February 1962 you are right. Galaxie was the lowest trim level.
 

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According to my 1962 Ford car and truck prices and specifications book second edition February 1962 you are right. Galaxie was the lowest trim level.


That is true, but even though it has the galaxie tag you could order them incredibly stripped down. Think light weight style, only without the power package.

I've stumbled across a couple '62s that were ordered without trim (no side or rear trim at all), were 2dr post cars and had almost nothing on the dash aside from the bare minimums. Yet they were not the lightweight cars that were raced. Still had the radio delete plates and all that though.
 

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Ford did make a low level car for 1962. It was officially subset of the Galaxie line. However it was not advertised to the general public, nor where any sent to dealers. In fact, even the Ford dealers didn't have any brochures on them at the dealerships. You would have had to gone through the corporate fleet leasing and buying department to get a brochure or a car. It was called the "Ford taxi and fleet special" according to the brochure. Nowhere in the brochure is the word Galaxie even mentioned. Most of the fleet specials and city/county/state cars were two door post sedans

These cars had bare minimum of everything, in abundance. Most were six cylinders, with manual shifts. A few had 292s in them. They had very weird options, like rpm/speed governor, heavy duty suspension, "extra-lean city carburetor," and other taxi like features.

Years ago there was a black 62 two door post sedan at a wrecking yard here in Phoenix. It had a slab vinyl seat in front, and no back seat. The rear side windows were fixed and had no cranks on them. It had a six with three speed manual, no power anything, and a radio and heater delete. Needless to say, it didn't have a clock! It had clear glass and no backup lights. Only the driver had a sunvisor and armrest. Where the back seat normally was, was instead a flat platform covered in rubber. The front floor had the remains of a black rubber mat. The car had absolutely no options and no creature comforts. From the junk that was inside of it, I think it may have been a city or county inspectors car. It's a shame this thing did not get saved and preserved, it had no rot or collision damage. Since then the closest thing to this I have seen is a red 62 fordor sedan, Galaxie series, with no radio, clock or heater. Just a 352 and C4 with Polaraire. The roof was painted white many years ago, but the car was coded to be solid red. On the dash was an ancient magnet that said "worlds best grandma." Its what I used to get parts for my '62 from. At least this thing had Polaraire!

Today it was 114 in Phoenix. Can you imagine anybody with that '62 stripper black two door post sedan and no air or anything on it, driving around here in the summer? It's certainly NOT what Jr. wants to ride in on his big summer route 66 trip from Chicago out to Disneyland with grandma and grandpa, stuck to that slab vinyl seat, no radio, windows up, one windwing barely cracked, vents open and blowing in 120 degree air under the dash, both grandparents smoking like chimneys, grandma filling the car with aqua-net on her hair every hour, and no radio, just endless hot desert! No Dennys or Sambos for you young man, you'll get the lunch granny packed; a liverwurst sandwich and hard boiled egg! Can't be stopping for lunch you know....have to make time hahaha.

Yes, they made strippers, but they were not advertised. Rarely on ebay I see the taxi/fleet special brochure for sale, but not very often.

Cheers,
Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ford did make a low level car for 1962. It was officially subset of the Galaxie line. However it was not advertised to the general public, nor where any sent to dealers. In fact, even the Ford dealers didn't have any brochures on them at the dealerships. You would have had to gone through the corporate fleet leasing and buying department to get a brochure or a car. It was called the "Ford taxi and fleet special" according to the brochure. Nowhere in the brochure is the word Galaxie even mentioned. Most of the fleet specials and city/county/state cars were two door post sedans

These cars had bare minimum of everything, in abundance. Most were six cylinders, with manual shifts. A few had 292s in them. They had very weird options, like rpm/speed governor, heavy duty suspension, "extra-lean city carburetor," and other taxi like features.

Years ago there was a black 62 two door post sedan at a wrecking yard here in Phoenix. It had a slab vinyl seat in front, and no back seat. The rear side windows were fixed and had no cranks on them. It had a six with three speed manual, no power anything, and a radio and heater delete. Needless to say, it didn't have a clock! It had clear glass and no backup lights. Only the driver had a sunvisor and armrest. Where the back seat normally was, was instead a flat platform covered in rubber. The front floor had the remains of a black rubber mat. The car had absolutely no options and no creature comforts. From the junk that was inside of it, I think it may have been a city or county inspectors car. It's a shame this thing did not get saved and preserved, it had no rot or collision damage. Since then the closest thing to this I have seen is a red 62 fordor sedan, Galaxie series, with no radio, clock or heater. Just a 352 and C4 with Polaraire. The roof was painted white many years ago, but the car was coded to be solid red. On the dash was an ancient magnet that said "worlds best grandma." Its what I used to get parts for my '62 from. At least this thing had Polaraire!

Today it was 114 in Phoenix. Can you imagine anybody with that '62 stripper black two door post sedan and no air or anything on it, driving around here in the summer? It's certainly NOT what Jr. wants to ride in on his big summer route 66 trip from Chicago out to Disneyland with grandma and grandpa, stuck to that slab vinyl seat, no radio, windows up, one windwing barely cracked, vents open and blowing in 120 degree air under the dash, both grandparents smoking like chimneys, grandma filling the car with aqua-net on her hair every hour, and no radio, just endless hot desert! No Dennys or Sambos for you young man, you'll get the lunch granny packed; a liverwurst sandwich and hard boiled egg! Can't be stopping for lunch you know....have to make time hahaha.

Yes, they made strippers, but they were not advertised. Rarely on ebay I see the taxi/fleet special brochure for sale, but not very often.

Cheers,
Mike
Thanks for the info. Did the fleet special have chrome door frames?
 

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I would love to know more about this stripped down car and especially the fixed rear windows.
 

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That is what I was thinking. I love the business coupes.
 

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Did the Fleet Special have chrome window frames you ask? The answer is, some did, and some didn't. It all depended on the contract between FoMoCo and the buyer.

The official name of this series is the: Ford Galaxie Mainliner Special. Yes, they brought back that horrid Mainline name once again! Each intended purpose car had it's unique sales brochure name. For police work, it was the Ford Galaxie Mainliner Interceptor (Ford Galaxie Mainliner Ranger was also used). Here is the police version, and you can see it has chrome window frames.


Here is an even cheaper, more stripped version of the Ranch Wagon, intended to be used by police departments as a "Paddy Wagon". It has painted frames.

Here is the Ford Galaxie Mainliner Taxicab. It has painted window frames. There is also a Ford Galaxie Mainliner Taxicab 'Special'. The "Special" denotes the bottom of the barrel, a six with heavy duty clutch, no options or anything. So much for the word "special".

It may be just an illusion, or illustration issue, but it sure looks like to me that these cars have 15 inch wheels on them. That would make sense, because these cars were intended for hard work.

These photos do not show city or government vehicles. The one I saw with no back seat was the Ford Galaxie Mainerliner Utility Special. Note, these cars do have minimum trim on the body, deck lid, and that chrome piece on the C pillar. It would have cost more to stamp out body panels without trim holes in them, than it cost Ford to just go ahead and install the trim.

Look at the Movie Car data base and you can see some photos of these plain janes, and a list of movies that they appear in. IMCDb.org: Home page

About 20% of these Galaxie Mainliners were bought by private indivduals. Mostly the elderly or cheapskates who wanted a full size car, but at a bargain basement price. These people were hard nosed about costs and didn't give a hoot about features, options, or any creature comforts!

Here is the second cheapest police car Ford sold, the Ford Police Defender with the small V8 in it. The Police Ranger was equipped with a 170 inline six and either three speed manual or Ford-O-Matic. Both were Tudor models, but for an additional $120 you could be a big spender and get the Fordor version haha! The cheapest police car you could buy was the Ford Falcon Ranger, a Tudor sedan with a 144 cid inline six at 85 hp, and a three speed manual or Ford-O-Matic. With a 0-60 time of 31 seconds, this slushbox could barely get out of it's own way. I don't know why anyone would buy this car. It couldn't have been for meter maids to use, because they used three wheeled Cushman scooters. So I don't know what use a Falcon Ranger would be.


Finally here is the second cheapest taxi Ford made. The Ford Fairlane Taxicab, with a six or a V8. Most were sixes. This competed against the Chevy II Taxicab and the Dodge Lancer Taxicab. I don't have a photo of a Falcon Taxicab. These competed against the Corvair Taxi (there was one sitting here in a junk yard, about half complete), the Valiant Taxi, and the Studebaker Lark Taxi. The smallest and cheapest taxi for sale in the USA in 1962 was the Rambler American Taxi Special. It had a sardine can for a body, a 195 cid inline L head six with solid lifters, and three on the tree. With four persons in it, plus the driver, and luggage, it wheezed down the road at 60 mph! It was something for only the smallest of towns to consider.


There are many photos and pages from brochures of taxis and fleet specials at this site: 1962 Ford Fairlane Police Ranger | Flickr - Photo Sharing!#

Hope this helps,
Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
How do you tell if you have a Mainliner? My parts car is a 62 4 door that was once a police car, 292, 3 speed on the column, radio delete.
 

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There is an old lady 2 blocks away that walks her dogs by my house when the weather is nice and it's not summer. Jean is her name. She bought her house in my tract new in 1960. She would always stop and chat about the Galaxie if I was outside working on it. One day she asked me if I could get a battery installed in her car (I had no idea she even still drove). I said, I'll do more than that, I'll drive you to Autozone and you can get your battery, and I drive us back to her house and intall it.

I drive down to her house, she opens the garage door, and its a 1961 Chevrolet Biscayne two door post sedan. Blue with a white roof. Not a dent on it, original paint and chrome. Here in the desert, chrome lasts forever, but weatherstripping rots away in 8 years or so.

So we got the battery, installed it, and I started the car to see that all was well. It has a six, with overdrive, power steering and dealer air, recirculating heater, radio and clock delete, and tinted glass.

Thats when I noticed something was missing. No rear window cranks or back seat. Just a flat, raised panel and blue rubber mat on it. It's a business utility sedan. She never married or had kids, was a librarian and had 3 or 4 small dogs all the time. She explained "I had the dealer order this car for me. When I travel with the dogs, I like them in the back area so they dont bother me when I'm driving". The car has 39,000 miles on it, and runs like new. It does have two visors and arm rests on the front doors, but none on the rear trim panels.

I told her when she gets ready to sell it, come talk to me first.
 

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The grill on that Mainliner Ranch Wagon does look strange, almost Pontiac like or something. And look the cops. The car is in color, but the policemen are black and white magazine cut outs. The middle and right cops are positioned correctly to be sitting in the front seat, but the left cop? He is nowhere near the back seat back rest. He appears to be next to the center post, where the backrest of the front seat supposedly is. I hope Ford didn't pay too much for this illustration.

Some other weird photos of Fords: Here is a Falcon purchased new in 1962 for use as an ambulance for the Kirby Lumber Co.


A '62 Galaxie ambulance made by Siebert. I see the 390 insignia on the fender, but no Galaxie script on the car. Just a chrome "Siebert" script on the front fenders


An advertisement for 1962 utility vehicles, that same Siebert ambulance is at bottom. Fire chiefs car is a low level Galaxie. Falcon utility sedans were often used by coroners, because they drew little attention.


Here is another Mainliner Ranch Wagon, being used to haul around police dogs. Commonly called K-9 Wagons

Here is a 63 version:


This is the front view of a 1960 Ford Fairlane hearse. It was produced in Australia. Ford normally sent the old Ford and Mercury tool and dies from the previous years models to Australia and they would become the current model. Thus, the 1959 American Fairlane became the 1960 Australian Fairlane,and so forth. Here you can see even though this is a true 1960 model, it is clearly a rehashed 1959 Ford with a 1959 Mercury grill. Usually these Australian Fords say just Ford on them, not model designation. This one says neither. Notice the charming hood ornament, which is a chrome plated bat.


Here is the driver's side. In the background you can see a white Holden hearse, based upon a Chevy II. Many of these foreign hearses were simply dolled up station wagons, and lacked the custom coachwork that Americans are used to seeing. I don't think too many here would be pleased to see a loved one shoved into a Falcon Wagon and driven off to the graveyard.


Here is the business end of the 1960 Fairlane hearse. Note overseas cars use amber rear turn signals back then.


Here is a domestic 1960 Galaxie hearse...I LOVE it! It has Italian bodywork, but was designed for the domestic USA market. I saw one just like this years ago at the professional car collectors convention. The one I saw had the Interceptor Special 352 with 360 h.p. This one looks as though it is posed near a crematorium. Hey, you gotta go sometime, why not take your last ride in this :)



Mike
 

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Thank You for the history lesson Astrojet. I really enjoy the photos too! :tup:

Keep up the good work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
This is the reason I started posting to this forum. I learned something new, and found out my hypothesis was wrong. Ford did indeed make a base model in 62.
 

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Mine is #164 in the registry. 223/OD, rubber floor cover, plain vinyl seats.
The side glass is framed in stainless though.
 

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Bugo, I don't know how you could tell if your police parts car is a "Mainliner" or not. I would think, that since this was not an official model series, but a sales marketing thing instead, that you would have to have the original paperwork to find out if the car was ordered and sold by the Ford Fleet Sales Division.

Other than that, I would assume that if your car had weird options on it, not just deleted items, it might clue you in. Most of these cars were only sold with the 223 six or the 292 V8. Certainly rubber floor mats, heavy suspension systems, etc., would give you a hint.

Small town taxi companies with little cash on hand would order a cheap stripper Galaxie from a dealer. While this is ok for a small town taxi that will only be used 2 or 3 years, it will not serve satisfactory in hard, everyday use in a large metropolitan area. The car will literally fall apart in 2 years. Those taxis are true Mainliners, because they are equipped as 4 door sedans, with heavy duty suspensions, extra cooling capacity systems, 15 inch wheels (usually), beefed up transmissions, and unique carburetors. The brochure talks about a "tri-range carburetor" which gives a special extra lean midrange for speeds 25 to 50 mph. What that is, I have no clue. Usually these cars always have manual chokes, some have a governor, and the upholstery is almost always slab heavy duty vinyl, never cloth. Most seem to have a single exhaust. Everything possible is done to nickel and dime the car to the lowest possible price, but yet toughen it up for daily street use. I read that in the 1960s, New York taxis were out in service 18 hours a day on average.

Perhaps one of the experts or collectors over at the Professional Car Society can help more than I can.
Professionalcar.org

Oh one thing I just now noticed: Look at that printed ad for the Fire Chiefs cars, and the other red cars. Look at the logo on the bottom. That is not the passenger car series logo. That is the symbol for the Ford Truck division. It has the gear with the lightening bolt, not the Galaxie star or the simple Ford oval. Now I am wondering if these fleet cars and utility sedans, taxis, etc., were officially part of the truck division and not the passenger car division. That would make sense, because you wouldn't drive down to your local Ford dealer to order a school bus or a hearse, neither would you go there to order an inspectors car or a cop car or taxi.

Hope this helps,
Mike
 

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Astrojet, Can you explain to me why in the picture of the Tennessee State Trooper car it says Galaxie on the front fender if indeed it is a Mainline. Also the picture of the 63 K-9 station wagon is just a regular Country Sedan.
 

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That's not a rehashed Mercury grille it is a 1959 Meteor grille. After the year was over Ford of Canada used the last years Meteor for the Oakville built Austalian Ford "Star" models. They used left over Edsel dashes in '64 etc. We're pretty poor up here in Canada we didn't let stuff go to waste!
 

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Astrojet, Can you explain to me why in the picture of the Tennessee State Trooper car it says Galaxie on the front fender if indeed it is a Mainline. Also the picture of the 63 K-9 station wagon is just a regular Country Sedan.
it dont look like it says galaxie but looks like country squire...
if you blow up to 400% you see spacing between the two words....
 
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