Ford Muscle Cars Tech Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
904 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was over at pony carburetor's website and they had some pretty bold statements to say about Autolite carbs, in reality how do they compare to edelbrock's and holley's,what do you guys think?:

AUTOLITE 2100
This is the finest two-barrel carburetor that has yet to be made, it is simply state-of-the-art today. Unless dirt gets in it, it will basically just keep running indefinitely. Nobody has ever built a two-barrel carburetor as good as this one is.

One calibration 1968 289 (C8ZF-G) does have some several engineering problems which we do correct (hesitation, flat spots and surging on acceleration).


Is this the carb thats on my 289(its stock)??? whats the cfm rating?

AUTOLITE 4100
This is the finest four-barrel carburetor that has yet to be made by anybody. In performance, reliability, and fuel economy it is simply state-of-the-art. It will "blow away" anything that holley has yet to make. There are several subtle engineering changes that we do to this carburetor to make the secondaries perform even better than the day they left the factory.

Does anyone have any info on the 4100? what the cfm rating on this one?
thanks,
Kenny

_________________
-Kenny-
---------------------------------
A Mustang is a poor mans Ferrari!

1968 289 coupe, 65B, my car.
1968 302 coupe, 65A, my dads car.

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: HitmanKB on 6/30/02 1:58pm ]</font>
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,758 Posts
Autolite carbs were great factory carbs. They performed the way customers wanted them to: they were reliable and trouble free. However, once you start needing to make performance mods, a 465 cfm carb won't cut it in terms of fuel delivery. That's why Ford started using Holley on their muscle cars and why the chevy guys would dump the rochester in the trash first thing and go buy a Holley.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
49 Posts
I must agree. The autolite is a good carb for what it was used for. But if it was that good why does almost everyone at the track have a holley. Plus remember, Pony Carbs is trying to sell you a carburetor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,105 Posts
I have had experience with the autolite 4300 series carb; its shitty. Center bowl design which is a pain becasue of all the casting plugs (they leak and screw up your fuel calibration). I dunno about the two other autolites you mentioned, I've heard on this page many times the 4100 is basically a Holley, in fact you use a holley rebuild kit to rebuild the autolite. But for your own peace of mind, stay away from the 4300. I swapped it out for a Holley and the car runs great! Good luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,154 Posts
I've got a 4300 on my mustang, and as soon as I can find a good deal on a holley, its gettin kicked to the curb. That POS flutters the secondaries, never holds a tune, and is so much of a pain to rebuild that Im just lettin it leak. Last time I tore it down I found the upperhalf of the powervalve assembly laying in the bowl.

I do have a holley 4175 sittin at my shop, but I dunno if its any good. I hooked fuel to it once, but it leaked and I never messed with it. any of ya ever mess with one?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
143 Posts
4100 are good carbs the 1.12 flow 600cfm .if you are looking for a 600 cfm carb with vacumn secondaries a 4100 is hard to beat
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
904 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Pony also had this to say, what do you guys think about this as well?

<U>Exclusive Autolite 4100 "Spread Bore"</U>

For the last several years you have been reading about how wonderful the Autolite 2100 and 4100 carburetors are. The reasons that these carburetors perform the best on the planet are:

1. Annular fuel discharge - which atomizes fuel much better than any other metering system ever engineered in any carburetor.

2. A one piece float bowl and main body casting that eliminates leaks and maintenance.

3. A simple appearing design that does not require constant adjustment and attention while providing superior fuel economy and straight line performance!

Focusing in on the 4100, there were 2 size manufactured (really 3, but you will never see a 1958 only 1.19). The most common 1.12" venturi 600 CFM, and the much rarer 1.08" 480 CFM, are the ones you will come across. The large 600 CFM (1.12) was factory installed on Galaxies and T-Birds with 352, 390 and 428 engines. The small 1.08 was used on "A" and "D" code 289's and 1966 only Galaxie and T-Bird's with 390 and 428 applications. (The big blocks used the small carburetor for emissions reasons.) The "K" code 289 HiPro was fed by unique 1.12 600 CFM manual choke performance calibrated 4100.

For a normal to even high performance 289 to function the best it must have a carburetor with around 480 CFM, and until now that meant the 1.08 Autolite. With the smaller size the driveability is flawless, i.e. no hesitation or flat spots and the fuel economy (with a 3.00 to 1 rear end) can exceed 20 miles per gallon. Add to that, the 1/4 mile performance is actually faster than the 600 CFM version.

There is a big problem with all this. A lot of enthusiasts have "listened" to the rave reviews of this engineering masterpiece and the supply of 1.08 4100's has been gobbled up all over the country. Just try and find one at a swap meet! Until now, the 1.08 was the only correct performance choice for the vast majority of 289/302 owners, and they either paid a hefty core charge ($150-200) or patiently scoured swap meets and salvage yards for a restorable core.

Pony Carburetors has made the "performance" search much easier. They have recently introduced a 1.12 venturi that works even better that the 1.08 on small blocks. By narrowing the primary venturi diameter to 1.00", it is now possible to get even better fuel economy, sizzling performance and driveability that begins to approach fuel injection. With the small primary ( 1.00" ) and the large secondary ( 1.1.8" ) the Autolite now has the spread bore characteristics that were so desirable and utilized by several carburetor manufacturers in the late 60's and throughout the 70's. The end result of a spread bore design maximizes fuel efficiency while maintaining neck jarring acceleration when the situation arises.


What do you think about their "spread bord" modification?

_________________
-Kenny-
---------------------------------
A Mustang is a poor mans Ferrari!

1968 289 coupe, 65B, my car.
1968 302 coupe, 65A, my dads car.

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: HitmanKB on 7/2/02 2:51pm ]</font>
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top