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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anybody hear of this? I guess its just a prototype. I saw it on Trucks! or a differant PowerBlock show. I had just sat down and didnt catch the whole episode.

They were putting it on a new cummins in a brand new Dodge. Claimed that it would virtually eliminate turbo lag.

From what i gathered, (i didnt even catch the whole part on the way it works) was that it used an electronic controler along with a banks Six Gun tuner, using info like throttle position, boost pressure and others, vanes in the turbo would be moved to adjust the geometry of the turbo. It wasnt the turbine it self being changed. I think it was the "size" of the turbo being changed.

Like i said, i didnt even hear the whole explanation on the way it worked

If anybody knows any more about it and would like to share that would be great. Turbos really interest me, and this would be a big breakthrough in turbo tech.
 

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weve been using them on the 6.uh ho for the past 3yrs,it would be cool on a street car though,its a PITA on the 6.0 with the vanes sticking
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The 6.0 comes stock with it? I thought it was something new the way they were talking about it was that it was a prototype and not even used.
 

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VGT has been used for years now on different things. Chrysler used VGTs on some of the little turbo 2.2's & 2.5's back in the 80's.

There was a guy over at Turboford.org that put a 6.0 VGT on a 2.3T. full boost (+30 psi) at 1600 RPM and last I heard he was working on building a controller to work the vanes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
WOW, on the show they made it sound like its the newest thing ever. I still think its really cool. Whats holding up more aftermarket products with it?
 

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The vanes stick continuously, or so it seems. There have been a lot of troubles with them in the past. Chrysler had problems. International is having problems with the 6.0 TD in the Super duty pickups. In fact, IIRC the '08 6.4L powerstroke will be a twin turbo, using conventional fixed turbine turbos. I hope the 6.4 puts the 6.0 to shame!

Personally I like the lag. If the combination is designed properly the lag is not an issue anyway. Its no different than comparing a high RPM race engine to a daily driver. One has power from 6000-8000 the other from idle to 4000. 2 totally different animals! With turbos, you can have big boost down low and choke it up top or you can have nothing down low and a top end charge that will knock your socks off.

Years ago I had an SVO Mustang that I modded the hell out of. One of the many mods was installing a Holset HE351CW turbo from a 2005 Dodge pickup. Basically the HE351 is a HX40 compressor with a HY35W turbine. If you're up on the Holsets you know that an HX40 is not a small compressor...they're capable of supporting around 550 HP +/-. I also made my own header for it. Spool time....haha...NO boost until 2500. By 3000 I had 5 psi. By 3500 I had 10. At 3800 it was like getting rear ended by a Mack. I forgot to hook up the WG hose once and pegged the 30 PSI boost gauge, and the motor never even made a hint of any noises. It came on very hard. Once you learn how to drive a turbo car with that much lag and that much top end power, you will have a winning and VERY fun combination! That car, even though it was a TURD below 3000 RPM, was THE most fun vehicle I've ever driven to date. And trust me when I say I've driven some neat stuff.

_________________
"it is better to appear ignorant than to open your mouth and remove all doubt"--Mark Twain

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: mavman on 11/21/06 7:24am ]</font>
 

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What most of you are calling "lag" is actually the "boost threshhold". Boost threshold is the lowest possible rpm at which there can be noticeable boost. Where lag is the amount of time it takes to go from no boost to boost when you go hammer down when in an rpm range above the boost threshhold.

With a properly sized turbo, there should be an unnoticeable amount of turbo lag and the boost threshhold should be within reason for a street driven car. It's most of the supercharger guys that bring lag into a SC/TC debate. Even though turbo's will make power sooner than most SC's.

Anyway, variably vane or variable turbine geometry has been around for a lot of years. I know recently they have been controlled by oil pressure and they are very hard, if not impossible, to adapt to a motor that is anything other than what the turbo was designed for. My brother has an 04 Ford with a Powerstroke and it produces 10lbs of boost cruising down the road at 55mph. I've seen it hit almost 30psi instantly when he puts his foot into it.

Regardless, if you go to the track, there are ways to build boost off of the line and not have any of this "lag". Two-steps for a manual tranny and a transbrake on an auto. There's more involved in this of course but it should give you a start if you want to look into it.
 

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Yeah, but its faster to type lag, and effectively that's what it is.


With a smaller turbo, sized properly, you won't have lag. But you also won't make as much top end as if you get a larger turbo, with a higher "boost threshold." because a smaller compressor displaces less air with each revolution.

Like anything, it's a tradeoff.
 
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