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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everybody,
I'm new here, but it looks like this is the place to be! Does anybody know for sure whether you can bolt a 5-bolt bellhousing up to a later 6-bolt block? Obviously, this was an engineering design change, but they tended to overdesign a lot back then -does anyone have stories about failed 5-bolt bellhousings?
 

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No way. No how.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks! I guess that sort of narrows down my engine selection if I want to use the transmission I have.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
I have a 64 Fairlane 3 speed. That's the one with the tall & narrow bolt pattern.
 

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The Toploader has dual pattern to fit both bellhousings. The center hole id is smaller on a 5-bolt bellhousing. I had a machine shop turn my bearing retainer down to fit the hole.

I never heard of a 5-bolt bellhousing failure yet

 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the info; I didn't realize that the extra holes in the toploader were for the same bellhousing. I did a little research on the subject of why they changed to six bolts. Apparently it was to help dampen vibration. :rolleyes:
 

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Just get yourself a six bolt bellhousing, My 64 Comet came as a 260V8/3spd and now I have a 67 289 bor.+ strok. to 302 with a 4sp Toploader. I use a bellhousing from an early 70s truck.
 

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I sold a guy a 302 once and we got to talking about my Falcon. He had a 63 Sprint he was drag racing. He said the clutch went up through the floor boards, through the dash, and through the windshield landing on the track.

5 bolt scattershields are out there. I've got two Micky Thompson old school cast steel ones. One I think is NOS and never installed. I bought both on ebay. One was listed as a Dodge bellhousing since it had WEDGE cast into it. I paid $72 plus shipping for it. Can't remember what I paid for the other one, but not much more than that.

If you go 5 bolt, you'll need the bearing retainer with a C0 casting number and not the common C5 casting number. You can have it turned down on a lathe or CNC mill to fit the smaller size.
 

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Thanks for the info; I didn't realize that the extra holes in the toploader were for the same bellhousing. I did a little research on the subject of why they changed to six bolts. Apparently it was to help dampen vibration. :rolleyes:
According to Bob Mannel the 6 bolt bellhousing came around because of the need to make the the clutch area larger to house an 11" clutch in truck applications. Making the bell bigger necessitated making the mounting bigger...6 bolts.
Joe

(Dead thread revival):)
 

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Best I can figure out, is that the six bolt bellhousings are all of aluminum and began showing up circa 1966. The prior five bolt ones (circa 1965) were CI and had been around for years.

The initial swap-over era had dual patterns on the face to transissions for bolting on to either pattern.

Wm.
 

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Odd that the 3/8 versus the 7/16 should matter. I've seen motors blow and seen results of a flywheel or two blown, but never did it matter if the bolts holding the bell on the car were 3/8" 5/16" or 1/2" ....

They never budged one little bit, from all the first hand in person shots and second hand photo's I've seen.
 

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Best I can figure out, is that the six bolt bellhousings are all of aluminum and began showing up circa 1966. The prior five bolt ones (circa 1965) were CI and had been around for years.
The 5-bolt bell housing is aluminum.



the 5-bolt BH's were only attaced with 3/8" bolts instead of the stronger 7/16" units used with the 6-bolt bellhousings.
The 5-bolt BH also uses 7/16" -14 bolts...same a a 6-bolt BH
 

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Best I can figure out, is that the six bolt bellhousings are all of aluminum and began showing up circa 1966. The prior five bolt ones (circa 1965) were CI and had been around for years.

The initial swap-over era had dual patterns on the face to transissions for bolting on to either pattern.

Wm.
From what I can gather the small car bells were aluminum and trucks were cast iron. Exceptions were the 69/70 Mustangs with 351 and Bosses with cast iron bells.
Heres a cast iron 6 bolt...notice the "C5T..." casting number. "T" for "truck".
Joe
 

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Hi Guy's! I'm new to the forum and I hope someone can give me some guidance. I am considering replacing my 260 with a 289, but am concerned about the right bellhousing. If I use a 5 bolt 289 all is well, but if I use a 6 bolt, my narrow pattern toploader won't fit the bellhousing. Didn't Ford make some bellhousings with both narrow and wide patterns in a 6 bolt? Thanks in advance!



"Eat dessert first, life is uncertain."
 

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You simply get a 6 bolt bellhousing, the Tranny will fit pretty much any bolt on Ford Bell.
Nope, not that simple. The early toploader from a 260 is not a bolt-on for a 6 bolt factory bellhousing:

260 5 bolt bellhousing toploader narrow case on the left, the "universal" toploader wide case on the right:




The one on the right was specifically designed for the 6 bolt bellhousings, but also retains the early pattern which allowed Ford to offer them as a service replacements for the early cars that originally came with the narrow case. Early bellhousings use only the the inner pattern, post mid-65 bellhousings use the outer ears for mounting.

One way to use the early narrow cased toploader on a mid 65' and later motor is to use a Lakewood scattershield (model 15200.) As you can see below, it has dual patterns to accept both the narrow and wide case:



I would love to see a photo of a factory SBF dual pattern bellhousing . . . . . .
 

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I took a cast iron one and drilled and threaded it for the early pattern. If you look in side of it you can see 4 small,maybe 3/8 inch spots that are spaced right for the early pattern. Just drill and tap them for your trany,be sure you are centered or you will have another problem. The aluminum ones may not have them ,but ford did make a dual pattern aluminum housing . I had one once but they are hard to find. It was during the same change over time as the dual pattern transmissions,which i have one of.
 

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The Lakewood scattershield would be a great alternative, unfortunately I don't think I have room for it in my application.




"Eat dessert first, life is uncertain."
 
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