Ford Muscle Cars Tech Forum banner
21 - 27 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,052 Posts
The Lakewood scattershield would be a great alternative, unfortunately I don't think I have room for it in my application.




"Eat dessert first, life is uncertain."
True.

More than likely you will be limited to a bell that uses the smaller 157 tooth flywheel. The 164, 11" clutch jobby will probably be out of the question.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,052 Posts
Interesting that it is a truck casting.

Thanks Joe, that helps a lot. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
233 Posts
Yeah Dennis I actually cheated. The narrow pattern holes are not drilled/tapped from the factory. But the bosses are present.
It is a truck casting made for the Bronco I believe, and its for the 164 tooth flywheel. It works perfect in my 289 6 bolt Comet. I had a narrow pattern Toploader and this "adapter' bell housing did the trick.

BTW later cast iron truck bells have "D1TA-" and D2TA-" casting numbers and they are the same as the "C5TA-" bell with the narrow bosses present.

BTW BTW Mustang-Tek lists that bell for 69/70/71 Mustang with 351W and C and Boss 351 http://mustangtek.com/Bellhousings/C5TA-6384-A.html
Heres a D1TA bell http://mustangtek.com/Bellhousings/D1TA-6384-AA.html

Just more info.

Joe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
The Toploader has dual pattern to fit both bellhousings. The center hole id is smaller on a 5-bolt bellhousing. I had a machine shop turn my bearing retainer down to fit the hole.

I never heard of a 5-bolt bellhousing failure yet

Hello what are you talking about center of bellhousing machined bigger or the fork for throw out bearing?
I have the same motor 5 bolt have not installed it yet Thank You!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,052 Posts
Hello what are you talking about center of bellhousing machined bigger or the fork for throw out bearing?
I have the same motor 5 bolt have not installed it yet Thank You!
He is talking about the "snout" of the transmission, the part that bolts on the front of the toploader housing using 4 bolts. Its better known as being a bearing retainer as it holds the bearing in place at the front of the case. Its where the throw out bearing rides:



There can be an OD difference of the larger area of the bearing retainer that must make contact inside of the bellhousing. On the earliest made bells and toploaders, both used a smaller diameter mating surface compared to later (and more common) built units.

Simply measure the ID of the rear bellhousing hole and compare it to the OD of the largest diameter of the snout. If they do not match, the snout can either be replaced or, in this case, be machined smaller to make it fit. Since the OP's snout was larger, he had a shop lathe it down to match the mating ID of the bellhousing.
 
21 - 27 of 27 Posts
Top