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Discussion Starter #1
Can you help me to find the best heads for my 393 engine, I have 1600$, hte haeds need to be almost 64cc chamber because my flat top piston (I have it, I can not spend again for piston) the camshaft is a Lunati 61401 solid flat tap, Grine # 10-VDSF-276, RPM Range 2600-6800, Lobe Sep. 110, lift .554 in, .576 ex, installed height1.85" 125 lbs
 

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AFR 185and 210 are more than 16000$ and comes only 58 and 72cc chamber
Another idea?
RHS 215's seem to match up well with your requirements.:

Racing Head Service (RHS) 35017-02 - RHS Pro Action Small Block Ford Cylinder Heads - Overview - SummitRacing.com

You would need to swap locks or retainers in order to gain a little more spring height if you use the springs that come on them. Even so, the springs found on the head may be too much for your solid lifter cam so that point may be moot.

It is always best to use the appropriate spring recommended by the cam manufacturer and have the heads setup properly with them. See if you can buy them with just the valves and add the correct springs, cups, retainers and locks.

No matter what head you choose, be sure to verify piston to valve clearance while the engine is still on the stand.
 

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AFRs are a generally good head, but to get 64+ CC chambers, that would be the 72cc 185s. About $1500. Other good options in this range with 64CC chambers are the TFS Twisted Wedge 190 (51400015) that flow about the same as AFR205s, and run $1450 online. There is more future potential in the TFS TW185s and high-port 192s, but not unless you plan to port them. If looking to open the box and bolt them on, I'd probably opt for the TW 190s or the AFR 185s if you can take 72 CCs. Also, the Twisted series has fewer piston interference issues at higher lifts (depending on the exact piston and installed cam timing), but you'll probably have to notch in any case. There are a few more options, but the AFR and TFS options are easy and reliable with excellent performance for the price.

David
 

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And there you go. The RHS 215s flow almost identically to the as-cast AFR 205s and TW190s, and the AFR 185 CNC (AFR-1387 strip port) are right up there with them. However, that leaves the 205s out, as they do not have the larger chamber.

The RHS heads come with springs that must be changed to Lunati springs. Something to consider - call Lunati and ask if they are OK with the supplied springs on either the AFR-1387 or TFS 51400015. If they say yes, you can save a chunk of cash and time using the springs that are already installed on those two.

David
 

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Discussion Starter #7
RHS 215's seem to match up well with your requirements.:

Racing Head Service (RHS) 35017-02 - RHS Pro Action Small Block Ford Cylinder Heads - Overview - SummitRacing.com

You would need to swap locks or retainers in order to gain a little more spring height if you use the springs that come on them. Even so, the springs found on the head may be too much for your solid lifter cam so that point may be moot.

It is always best to use the appropriate spring recommended by the cam manufacturer and have the heads setup properly with them. See if you can buy them with just the valves and add the correct springs, cups, retainers and locks.

No matter what head you choose, be sure to verify piston to valve clearance while the engine is still on the stand.
minutes ago I talk to a representative of RHS and told me that the RHS 215cc are big for my engine, he prefers to use the RHS RHS 200cc part number 35016-02, he thinks that using the 215cc I lose power at low rpm, I would like to hear your opinion about it
 

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minutes ago I talk to a representative of RHS and told me that the RHS 215cc are big for my engine, he prefers to use the RHS RHS 200cc part number 35016-02, he thinks that using the 215cc I lose power at low rpm, I would like to hear your opinion about it
Quick answer due to a big race filled weekend.

A 393 has tons of torque and does not need any type of head/intake/exhaust restriction in order to work well at lower RPM's. Absolutely will not loose low rpm HP as long as the vehicle is not extremely heavy (over 4000lbs or more) and the rear gear is quite numerically low (ie 2:80.) Unless you are building a motor for an irrigation pumps or other applications that need to run lower RPM's with high torque, you would be better served to get larger heads.

For the record typically SBF heads are quite small compared to the SB Chevy counterparts and for some reason only the Ford clan thinks that small heads are required for the street on strokers. Remember that 393 ci are big block cubes and they need to be fed as such. Have you ever seen the heads that Chevy put on their old 396 motors? Large valves and cavernous ports. These motors were used in lowly (and heavy) grocerygetters/pickups and they worked great. These same head principles are still used in Chevy performance engines today (and can even be found in my 6.0L HD2500 toter.)

My 393 is astreet/strip 93 octane pump gas motor and I yet consider the AFR 205 ports to be on the small side. This head was chosen because the exhaust ports work with my engine compartment and they are a decent out of the box head. There are certainly better ones out there. As a future upgrade, I am planning on going with a CNC ported TF 205 (standard exhaust port location) which should be a decent performance improvement and yet keep me happy running around town.

I am not telling you that you won't be satisfied with the 200's as I do not know your vehicle or goals. You might be totally satisfied with the reps' recommendation. I just wanted you to know that the requirement to use a smaller head for street torque is groundless with a windsor stroker.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Quick answer due to a big race filled weekend.

A 393 has tons of torque and does not need any type of head/intake/exhaust restriction in order to work well at lower RPM's. Absolutely will not loose low rpm HP as long as the vehicle is not extremely heavy (over 4000lbs or more) and the rear gear is quite numerically low (ie 2:80.) Unless you are building a motor for an irrigation pumps or other applications that need to run lower RPM's with high torque, you would be better served to get larger heads.

For the record typically SBF heads are quite small compared to the SB Chevy counterparts and for some reason only the Ford clan thinks that small heads are required for the street on strokers. Remember that 393 ci are big block cubes and they need to be fed as such. Have you ever seen the heads that Chevy put on their old 396 motors? Large valves and cavernous ports. These motors were used in lowly (and heavy) grocerygetters/pickups and they worked great. These same head principles are still used in Chevy performance engines today (and can even be found in my 6.0L HD2500 toter.)

My 393 is astreet/strip 93 octane pump gas motor and I yet consider the AFR 205 ports to be on the small side. This head was chosen because the exhaust ports work with my engine compartment and they are a decent out of the box head. There are certainly better ones out there. As a future upgrade, I am planning on going with a CNC ported TF 205 (standard exhaust port location) which should be a decent performance improvement and yet keep me happy running around town.

I am not telling you that you won't be satisfied with the 200's as I do not know your vehicle or goals. You might be totally satisfied with the reps' recommendation. I just wanted you to know that the requirement to use a smaller head for street torque is groundless with a windsor stroker.
Dennis thanks for the information, let me tell you more about my car and my goals:
My car is a mustang fox body 1983
Rear End 4:10
Transmission AOD, TCI 3000 RPM stall converter
750 Holley carb
Probe forged Flat top Pistons (that's why I need 64cc o more chamber)
Long Header with muffles 2 1/2" (flow master)
Engine 393 stroke
Camshaft Lunati mechanical flattep (specification are in my first thread)

My goals, car will be street use (not all days just short distances, I have another car to travel) and race on weekend, I want go close to 11,60 seconds in a 1/4 mille, If I can go to 10,90 sec will be graet, but I know that's dificult, I will be happy with 11,60

Dennis if do you need another information, please let me know, I JUST WANT TO MAKE A RIGTH CHOSSE FOR HEADS, HEADS ARE EXPENSIVE AND I WANT BUY HEADS ONE TIME
 

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Looks like a decent combination that should be able to meet your goal. Loose weight where you can, especially in front of the driver and be prepared to work the suspension. The first 60' will make all the difference in the world. With 4.11's and the Mustang being a light car, you will not have low end torque problems whatsoever on the street. I hope that your tranny is built to take it.

From a drag racing perspective, about the only mechanical "weaknesses" that you might have is the converter is on the tight tight side. A good drag converter stall would be somewhere around 1000 rpm under your peak. Of course that might hamper your car's streetability (which is an individual perception.) If your car is like mine, it prefers a 950 carb although the 750 did work decent and got me well into the 11.20's (with 93 octane.)

The good news is that any of the heads mentioned in this thread can get you your goal, but again you will need to work the car and suspension in order to get there.

HEADS ARE EXPENSIVE AND I WANT BUY HEADS ONE TIME
Based upon this statement alone, I again suggest the larger 215 head. Why? Because drag racers are never satisfied with just reaching a goal and stopping. That 11.60 goal will become a 10.90 goal. Its a disease and you will want more-guaranteed.

It is always cheaper to do something once right than it is to do it a second time. This is especially important with heads because they offer more power potential to an engine than any other single part. Heads are not a place to skimp unless your goals can be met by other means.

For the budget that you have available to you, the 215 head will give you more bang for the buck in the long run unless you go crazy with the cubes. If you feel that drag racing might be a real passion for you, I would even suggest that you hold off on your head purchase for a while and save up more $$ for some reworked TF highports, CNC TF 205's/225's, or or to a lesser extent maybe even AFR 205's since heads are really what makes an engine run hard. All these heads are still streetable for a combo such as yours.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Looks like a decent combination that should be able to meet your goal. Loose weight where you can, especially in front of the driver and be prepared to work the suspension. The first 60' will make all the difference in the world. With 4.11's and the Mustang being a light car, you will not have low end torque problems whatsoever on the street. I hope that your tranny is built to take it.

From a drag racing perspective, about the only mechanical "weaknesses" that you might have is the converter is on the tight tight side. A good drag converter stall would be somewhere around 1000 rpm under your peak. Of course that might hamper your car's streetability (which is an individual perception.) If your car is like mine, it prefers a 950 carb although the 750 did work decent and got me well into the 11.20's (with 93 octane.)

The good news is that any of the heads mentioned in this thread can get you your goal, but again you will need to work the car and suspension in order to get there.



Based upon this statement alone, I again suggest the larger 215 head. Why? Because drag racers are never satisfied with just reaching a goal and stopping. That 11.60 goal will become a 10.90 goal. Its a disease and you will want more-guaranteed.

It is always cheaper to do something once right than it is to do it a second time. This is especially important with heads because they offer more power potential to an engine than any other single part. Heads are not a place to skimp unless your goals can be met by other means.

For the budget that you have available to you, the 215 head will give you more bang for the buck in the long run unless you go crazy with the cubes. If you feel that drag racing might be a real passion for you, I would even suggest that you hold off on your head purchase for a while and save up more $$ for some reworked TF highports, CNC TF 205's/225's, or or to a lesser extent maybe even AFR 205's since heads are really what makes an engine run hard. All these heads are still streetable for a combo such as yours.
Dennis Today I went to my mechanic to talk about the heads, he is concerned because of the piston-to-valve clearance (he said is a big valve 2.08), He Was looking on ebay and he likes These heads, can you take a look on Those heads and tell yor my reviews
sbf ford aluminum head 227cc CNC 289 302 331 351w 408 quality parts & assembly | eBay
 

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If you're on a tight budget but want to do it right, look here. But, he also has them on Fleabay for $50 less and free shipping here. Do the math. Piston clearance is a normal part of performance engine building, and cutting them in the engine is not hard to do. Search for articles on how to do it at home with cheap tools in the Tech section.

David
 

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If you're on a tight budget but want to do it right, look here. But, he also has them on Fleabay for $50 less and free shipping here. Do the math. Piston clearance is a normal part of performance engine building, and cutting them in the engine is not hard to do. Search for articles on how to do it at home with cheap tools in the Tech section.

David
+1 :tup:

I think everyone knows how I detest Procomp heads after my prior experiences so I won't bash then here again. Avoid these cheap heads is my best advice.

The heads David linked to are cast iron versions of RHS heads that I suggested earlier. Not a bad deal for a decent head that should work well on your 393.

You never want to assume that piston to valve clearances are good when you install performance cams and heads. Here is my article on how to check and inexpensively cut the valve reliefs in the pistons: http://www.fordmuscleforums.com/engine-articles/484906-another-technique-piston-notching.html
 
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