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:cry: F*&^%$$ body work! I finally have the driver quarter and wheel arch to what I think is the 75-80% level, thats as far as my skills will take me, before I turn it over to the body shop (whole car at that level)
Of course they are going to say, "thats gooned up, we need to re do it" grrrrrr.
As I get close to the final stages, a couple of questions. The repro driver fender has no holes for emblems/letters, the orig pass fender of course does. Do I weld up the orig holes and go with stick ons, or do I leave it and plan on drilling the holes - what is best? I did weld up the ant hole, moving the ant to the back.
I am thinking I may try my hand at painting the door jams, inside the cowl before I close it up, inner doors, deck lid, back glass and winshield frames while its apart.
I decided on my color, its a Toyota Avalon ice blue. My question, its probably a two part paint, so would I color the jams etc and hold off on the final clear coat when they paint the rest of the car or clear the jams etc too. Or just dont mess with it. Or, go single stage? Thanks, I hope to update my making prog soon, there are no non factory holes in the car now!
CS Decklid should be here next week, so I can start fitting that, that will be the last big time sink body project I think - hope.

Body work - :mad:
 

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:cry: F*&^%$$ body work! I finally have the driver quarter and wheel arch to what I think is the 75-80% level, thats as far as my skills will take me, before I turn it over to the body shop (whole car at that level)
Of course they are going to say, "thats gooned up, we need to re do it" grrrrrr.
As I get close to the final stages, a couple of questions. The repro driver fender has no holes for emblems/letters, the orig pass fender of course does. Do I weld up the orig holes and go with stick ons, or do I leave it and plan on drilling the holes - what is best? I did weld up the ant hole, moving the ant to the back.
I am thinking I may try my hand at painting the door jams, inside the cowl before I close it up, inner doors, deck lid, back glass and winshield frames while its apart.
I decided on my color, its a Toyota Avalon ice blue. My question, its probably a two part paint, so would I color the jams etc and hold off on the final clear coat when they paint the rest of the car or clear the jams etc too. Or just dont mess with it. Or, go single stage? Thanks, I hope to update my making prog soon, there are no non factory holes in the car now!
CS Decklid should be here next week, so I can start fitting that, that will be the last big time sink body project I think - hope.

Body work - :mad:

If you are going to put the emblems back on I would drill the new fender. You could make a template off the old fender with the holes and use it on the new one. Easier than welding up holes. I would drill them before paint.

I would go with BC/CC. If you do go with BC/CC and do the jams and such, you will need to clear them when you spray the base. If you leave the base on jams for them to clear when car is painted. Then the base would need to be sanded and another coat of base reapplied.

They can just back tape the jams when painting the car. There is also a foam tape for this.

Go for it, painting is easy, the fun part

Lou
 

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Thanks fellas, I figured painting like floor pans. Your first venture should not be the most visible part of the car.

I look back on my floor pan job and compare it with the sheet metal work I am doing now. Go ugly early, get it over with.:eek:

Ill try the painting, be a good expiriment to see if I actually like this color, how much to do the insides of a hood, deck lid, jams, cowl? Use a mini gun or full size?
 

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I would start with a pint, (might take 2 to complete depending on where all you are spraying. (if just jambs, and cowl area probably one will suffice. (less you spend on the color NOW is better than enough to cover whole car) and decide its not what you expected/wanted.

Mini-gun. Thats all i use for doing jams, dash areas, cowls etc. sure more trips but much more maneuverable and precise.

M2C, your mileage and others opinions may vary.
 

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I would start with a pint, (might take 2 to complete depending on where all you are spraying. (if just jambs, and cowl area probably one will suffice. (less you spend on the color NOW is better than enough to cover whole car) and decide its not what you expected/wanted.

Mini-gun. Thats all i use for doing jams, dash areas, cowls etc. sure more trips but much more maneuverable and precise.

M2C, your mileage and others opinions may vary.
Awesome thanks.
 

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drill your own and let body shop fix your faux paux.....
FE, FEMALE K9 ING web site - great story. So whats the wife doing now. Retired like the rest of us? Nebraska eh, wtf is the Navy doing out there.

Hey man, one thing I was looking for in your story about all your experience, and where you learned the trade - you dont mention anywhere who taught you to be such a grump o potomus:)

Just kidding man, I truly appreciate your brutal honesty, great sight, great rides. Not a huge fan of the Chevy, but the Camero is looking really nice. Great paint.
 

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LOL, getting screwed into doing $35000 dollars worth of work on a 64 Mustang for $27,000 is what made me a grumpy prick :)

Sometimes you just gotta tell your customer, if you need to ask how much it will cost, you need to go somewhere else. So I just say it how it is. :)
Yeah, that kind of price delta may toss me into a prick frenzy too. Normally its just myself I scream at when I realize how much I blew on a bad decision. Its when I scream back I get scared. Great work man. Very nice cars and web site.
 

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Cool, hope you do well, in this economy its tough.

Serious question, I had a parking lot bumber ding in my pass fender, started at the rear wheel arch, and creased back to the running horse badge.
Read my "Metal Dinging" book, and this was one of my first forays into hammer and dolly work.

Got the crease out pretty well, only prob, I think I stretched the metal too much and now I have a bit of outward bulge where all that occured. Read somewhere heat and cooling will re shrink? Start outside or inside fender, work from edge to middle of bulge? Cherry red in one spot or not so hot?

I am determined to goon this up.
 

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Read somewhere heat and cooling will re shrink? Start outside or inside fender, work from edge to middle of bulge? Cherry red in one spot or not so hot?

I am determined to goon this up.
hahaha, its easier to 'goon up' than actually fix. trust me i know. ;)

I usually start right on the bulge, depending on the size of bulge, dull cherry red and a rag quinch (sp I THINK lol) check and repeat, moving along the 'crease'

Thats how EYE do it, others may disagree, but I am ok with that also.... ;)
 

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Consistent with smacking going on. I can smack with the best of them. Thanks.
 

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I did a lot of P&B years back, but I'm not a natural at it like some. I have to work at it and use as many tricks as I can. for stratched areas, I used heat and quench, and was told by another natural to only heat hot enough to steam the water like a frying pan. If it heat-colors the metal or begins to glow at all, it's beyond the shrink point and also hardens the metal. The lower-temp shrinking works really well, and you can repeat shrinking in the same spot.

This lead me to the shrinking disc. What a simple but cool tool. It heats like any other heat source but by friction. At the same time, it only heats the stretched areas, and the friction shows the high spots as you go. A great thing for inept bodyworkers like me (actually my metal and fiberglass work is pretty darn good - it's the finishing putty work that I suck at, so don't ask me to finish a full fiberglass body ;)).

Anyway, use all the tricks you can (this is a good forum for info), such as using a shop rag under your hand when feeling panels to feel imperfections much easier, and using guide layers, cross-stroke long-board sanding, etc. Finish it all yourself. Using tricks and techniques will let you do good bodywork - even if you can't. :tup:

David

The friction disc is basically just a plain flat stainless plate. The guy who showed me originally used soapy water, and the soap reduced metal removal and galling. Others like this video use air for cooling. Note how the metal never gets really hot:

Shrinking Disc Video Trailer - YouTube
 

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Ill try the painting, be a good expiriment to see if I actually like this color, how much to do the insides of a hood, deck lid, jams, cowl? Use a mini gun or full size?
I would say at least a quart of paint, maybe two. The underneath hood and trunk will take some paint. Jams and cowl not so much. You doing the insides of doors too I thought?

I use my full size gun for pretty much everything but using a mini if you have it might be easier.

I usually put 3-4 coats of base for coverage. Some colors that don,t cover so well more.

Are you painting over a solid color or multi? If everything is solid color (in primer) hiding will happen quicker but doesn't mean color is correct. Color could be lighter or darker depending on primer, light gray va black or dark gray.

If painting over solid color do a test card or test on scrap piece of metal to see how many coats you need to get the color right.

If multi colored (some primer, some orig color) then paint till it hides and a additional coat.

Your paint supplier should be able to tell you if the color you picked covers well or not

Lou
 

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I use my stud gun for shrinking metal, quick and easy. If you have access to one or can borrow one I would recommend using it less chance of making problem worse.

If not the shrinking disc PSIG mentioned also works well and in a bind you can use a wornout grinding disc to do same thing, turn disc over and use backside of it. Still creates heat by friction, and shows high spots, just takes a little longer.

No matter what procedure you use try it on scrap metal (same gauge) till you get the hang of it.

Don,t try to do it all at once, take your time and working it out slowly instead of trying to do it all at once will work better and keep you out of trouble.

Lou
 

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The reason for the hammer and dolly when shrinking is to draw the metal in from the outside to the center then the last hit is on center to tighten up the metal then quench it with water to cool. Done right it works great done wrong and you have a much bigger mess on your hands. Don't forget that heat will travel real quick on a quarter panel and make extra work for you way outside of where you are working. Never go over the size of a dime on your heat when shrinking, starting at the highest spot on the work. then follow the high spot.
 
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