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Hey guys bought a 427 thought it was real but may not be anymore, engine came out of a street legal race car ,
Was told it's a top oiler not side oiler

found D1F and 2 was under neath it
i found that by the oil filter I think

14 352 another number

engine is not stock punched out, sk 35369 heads forgot the intake but not stock anyways but it is alumium

it has cross bolt mains
How do I tell if it's a side oiler or top oiler?
here are some pictures

Looks to be C4AE-6015-A Comes up as 427
https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B0ouxi_64OO3c2VFV3dGcHVLdDQ

Link for pics thanks
Thanks
 

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It's hard to see from the pictures, but I am not convinced either. It is a 2 bolt motor mount block, which would be correct for the era, but it sort of looks like a converted 390 to me, I'd have to see closer to be sure.

Although I have only had 63s and sideoilers, 64 427 should say HP on the casting I think, not 352, and those crossbolts do not look recessed enough (and are not the stock bolts, although that doesn't mean much after 50+ yrs)

Here is a picture of my 63 block, not identical, but gives you an idea of what I am saying



Do you have pictures of the main caps with the pan off? That would be more telling
 

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The one pic that would show what you have (the one pic of the rear of the block) is cut off on the left side. There should be two threaded plugs on the left side if it's a sideoiler.
 

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The one pic that would show what you have (the one pic of the rear of the block) is cut off on the left side. There should be two threaded plugs on the left side if it's a sideoiler.
C4 block wouldn't be a side oiler anyway, it'd be a center oiler.
 

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All my books say its an early 352 or 390 block. Found you a web reference that says the same. Again, a picture of the main caps would be very telling, but so far I really think you have a crossbolted 390 or 352 block

Block
 

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Thought the center oiler would have oil pressure relief valve at the back of block by camshaft like the 406.
 

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Thought the center oiler would have oil pressure relief valve at the back of block by camshaft like the 406.
Crap...you are right, I saw what you read, but read it as the two side oiler bosses on the pass side. You are correct

Not this


But the center one should be there
 

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It's NOT a side oiler. The passage is not there on the driver's side , just below the motor mount. As mentioned it is an early block by the lack of four motor mount bolt holes. The heads are from DOVE engineering in OH and are NOT rare , you can buy a set just like them today. Great heads , but "current". I too am concerned about the "look" of the cross bolt area and the oil gallery plugs on the bellhousing view. They don't look right. Time to pull the pan and take more pictures. The aluminum water pump is probably a DOVE unit too. The balancer is from Professional Products IMHO. The internals will determine if you got a deal or not. Make sure you post a clear shot of the side of the cross bolt main caps and the side of the block to see if the bosses are there for the cross bolts.
Randy
 

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Funny, I was just reading about 427 ID on another site and found this interesting drill bit test also and had copied and saved it a few minutes ago. Not sure how much use it is but it was an interesting test. Durn it, I didn't get the part of who posted this and given them credit at least and somewhere on that forum is the original post that may be more organized but I couldn't find it. I have no idea about this kind of stuff and only sharing some info I thought would be of help possibly.
==============================================


...on the absolutely correct numbers for the water jacket gaps, but a few more folk have run these "drill bit" checks on their block collection and come up with some interesting numbers.

My collection of numbers remains horribly incomplete. I posted some numbers long ago, but have never gotten back out to run a thorough check of what I've got. I'm bumming about that, but I guess I keep myself too busy so I can't whine too much about that.

Here's what I found:

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A 17/64" or 16/64" is approximately the drill bit that fit's between the jackets of a 330FT, 360, 390, 410 block at the very widest spot I could find on the whole block.

A 14/64" or 13/64" drill bit is approximately the drill bit that fit's between the jackets of a 361FT/391FT, 428 reinforced "C" block at the very widest spot I could find on the whole block.

A 8/64" drill bit is approximately the drill bit that fit's between the jackets of a 427 block at the very widest spot I could find on the whole block (not actually correct, as I only quickly checked a couple gaps).

A 5/64" drill bit is approximately the drill bit that fit's between the jackets of a 427 alternate-jacket block at the very widest spot I could find on the whole block (not actually correct, as I only quickly checked a couple gaps - though I'm starting a rumor that this might be a later-type of 427 jacket). (15may2008 edit: this 427 block turned out to be sleeved)

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If I was going to the junkyard this week, I'd likely bring a hammer and punch to pop the core plugs out of the block, and I'd also bring along a 15/64" drill bit, as it should readily find a way to slip through the walls of a 330FT, 360/390/410 block, but would likely not fit a 361/391 or 428 casting. I don't have info on the 332/352 casting yet.

This drill bit value will most certainly change as I sample more blocks. My estimates are horribly crude at this time, but I felt it important to present the drill-bit concept to everyone, even with my insufficient data set.

Note also that I only refer to drill bits in "1/64" increments, as a .125" drill bit is referred to as an 8/64" drill bit. I do this so I can nickname the gaps "8", "13", "16", or whatever a block measures to, as an easy way to categorize a block.

Lastly, my present method of searching out the "largest" gap is possibly not the most robust method. I should perhaps actually measure and record the largest gap between all six cylinder pairs of a block, and calculate the average of these numbers to come up with a more characteristic gap. Time will tell whether the second method is necessary. For now, the simpler "biggest gap" method is the favorite check.

Keep your eyes and ears open for measurements which other folk have made. I'm aware that some have made many more measurements than I, and all these checks will add to the accuracy of what drill bit should be selected for the hunt.
 
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