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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First stop...brakes. I feel I shouldnt cut any corners in this area, yet I cant afford to swap to disc right now. I have on line that is shot, so I plan on just replacing all the hard lines, and I guess all 4 rubber lines, and probably the master just to be safe. Dearborn classics is one of my only sources I have looked into so far. They appear to have what I need, however, wanted to ask if there was a better...read "cheaper" source for what I need. And most importantly, my car is a Custom 500 I have been told that it is not a galxie at all, but a totally seperate car, and I have been told that its essentially a trim class of a galaxie. Whats the scoop?
 

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All 1965 Fords are basicly the same. The 2dr sedan and h/t have the same frame as the 4dr sedan. The 4dr ht, convt. and sw have individual frames. The body parts are individual to the type car that you have, as well as the mechanical parts. Therefore the Galaxie and Custom are trim differentials.

As for the brakes most parts are available from Auto Zone, Parts America etc. I buy my parts locally, and save a lot of money. I use generic steel lines purchased locally and bend them to the shape needed. If you don't have a tubing bender buy one from Harbor Freight. They have a good one that includes the springs. The springs are helpful when bending tight curves, as they reduce the chance of collapsing the tubing. These type benders are usually available at other stores locally.

DIY takes more time but it saves money.

_________________
Ray



<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: rayell on 4/6/06 8:01pm ]</font>

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: rayell on 4/6/06 8:01pm ]</font>
 

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There's nothing wrong with drum brakes in normal use. If you expect their ideosyncricies(water) and respect thier limits(fade), they work just fine.

Autokrafters was reasonable on the stuff I couldn't get locally. I went with prebent lines and they were nice. be sure to replace your hardware, and if it were me I would get the best hydraulic components I could find. Try to find Wagner.
 

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I have found all the brake parts at a local parts place for my 67. Much cheaper than Dearborn etc. I got a reman. MC from Napa for $19.00. I ended up going with Inline for the Stainless lines.
 

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I am finishing up a four wheel disc conversion on my 66 Gal 500. You should have three rubber hoses on your 65, one on each front wheel and one from the floor pan to the read end housing that connects to a splitter block that conects to each rear brake.

Hoses are available at Auto-Zone, mine cost about $12.00 each. Custom bent lines can be purchased at Inline.com or other companies. They are available for your application check em out for cost.

If you choose to make your own lines from lines from lines available from the auto parts stores, be sure to purchase a double flare tool designed for brake lines. Brake line pressure can meet or exceed 1000 pounds per square inch and a double flare is needed to prevent the line from splitting at the connections.

Now may be a good time to update your master cylinder from the jelly jar to a two chamber one like the one pictured in Psivory's replyt. The master cylinder cost is about the same, just a little more fabrication, but you will have a much safer brake system.
 

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I won't disagree with you at all on the MC upgrade, but I grew up in the era of the single piston style and I have one on my car and truck. I flush the fluid every year and check the fluid regularly. I have had a lot less trouble with them than the double ones. The double ones like to blow back past the rear seal into the floorpan, not only making a mess but leaving you with little or no pedal. I know the single can leave you with no pedal if you have a major loss of fluid, but so can a double, you just get a few blocks further.

The best strategy is to have a good working e-brake and instinctually go for it when the pedal drops the slightest bit from normal. I have driven home, and to the shop on the e-brake. It is the equalizer between the two systems dual and single reservoir in my book. It just takes a little thought, and never taking the pedal for granted, which a man ought to be doing anyway. The contingency plan is the plan.
 

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Like others have said - I got all my hoses and my MC from the local parts shop (Checker) for pennies compared to the restoration houses. Mine is not a restore project so I am not worried about it and they will get ripped out in the next few years when I go disk so....

I have learned not to say " '65 Custom" in the parts store - I invariably get - "custom what?" I just tell them its a Galaxie. Outside of trim I have yet to find anything that did not fit. State Farm even refers to it as a "1965 Ford Galaxie (Custom)"


_________________
'65 Custom 2 Door Project Car

Remembering to live Coram Deo

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: 65Custom on 4/7/06 12:48am ]</font>
 

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Look up my posting on disc brake swaps "Galaxie_406", I can also send you the interchange numbers that you can use for the local discount store.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I was just under the assumption these cars were old enough that I wouldnt be able to find the rubber lines or MC's at the Local parts house. Thats great news. Should I be replacing the wheel cylinders? or if they work is it ok to leave them be?
Is there a prefered brake fluid to use? I noticed pvisory has a blue looking fluid much like some motorcycle guys I know. Is there anything to that?

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: 65Kustom500 on 4/7/06 2:55am ]</font>
 

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On 2006-04-06 11:54, 65Kustom500 wrote:
I was just under the assumption these cars were old enough that I wouldnt be able to find the rubber lines or MC's at the Local parts house. Thats great news. Should I be replacing the wheel cylinders? or if they work is it ok to leave them be?
Is there a prefered brake fluid to use? I noticed pvisory has a blue looking fluid much like some motorcycle guys I know. Is there anything to that?

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: 65Kustom500 on 4/7/06 2:55am ]</font>
Yes, He has stainless brake lines.
 

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I would replace the wheel cylinders with rebuilt ones along with new brake shoes, check wih Auto-Zone or whoever is your local parts supplier.

Study up on the brake fluid, there is a difference between regular and silicone brake fluid.
 

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I am using Silicone which was reccomended by Inline (and supplied with the lines) I think an advantage (which could also be a disadvantage) is that Silicone doesn't absorb water so the lines don't rust from the inside out, and a higher boiling point. I think the best thing about it so far is that it doesn't affect paint and makes bleeding etc easier and cleaner.
 

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Difference with Silicone fluids is that 1. it does not work well with ABS and 2. takes a little more effort to stop the car and 3. It does not absorb water but then the water collects in various places rusting other parts of your brake system. Your Choice....
 

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I would replace the wheel cylinders with new/rebuilt ones and purchase new springs on all four corners. Your local auto parts store have springs kits for all four corners as well. As mentioned in an earlier post, if your emergency brake does not work, repair it to get the car to stop. Also, mid 60's to early 80's Ford with automatic trans's were notorious for slipping out of park into reverse while idling in park. I religously use my e-brake on all of my vehicles, all of the time.

We have Auto-Zone around here, and they have not failed me yet in having 66 Gal parts, or having the ability to order parts they do not have in stock.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
While I was under the car I noticed my fuel line is pretty crusty as well. Is it imperitve that I use a hard line? I could run rubber for a fraction of the cost. Is it just safer to have the hard line?
 

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On 2006-04-06 21:28, Galaxie_406 wrote:
2. takes a little more effort to stop the car and
As in you have to push the pedal harder to stop?

_________________
Scott
1967 Galaxie 500
Original Paint, Chrome, Glass


<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: psivory on 4/9/06 8:09am ]</font>
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Looks like I'll be placing an order with inlinetube.com for the hard lines, and a parts house for the rubber. Still cant seem to find the rubber line for the back. Found both front, but no rear line. Is there another application that will work? or am I looking in the wrong places. Autozone etc..
 
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