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With new floors, new Dynamat, and new carpet on its way, I started looking for some good insulation for my '66 Mustang. My biggest problem with driving my Mustang is the heat that comes with these old cars. The motor does a good job of cooking you out. I like to do everything I can from what I read, insulation appeared to be something that can make your hot rod much more enjoyable. There are a lot of benefits to convince you to do this job but the costs can be a huge deterrent. But don't put this project off because of costs just yet.

I found a lot of different products out there. I figured that my top pick would have been Dynamat's product because of the great experience I have had with them on the sound deadening stuff but the cost killed it. Continued research pointed me to some bubble insulation stuff that I found. After more digging I found that this stuff would start out good but then not finish so strong. The bubble stuff will pop when you get in and out of the car. This will kill any benefits it can/would provide. So that is out.


So I am reading one night on a local hot rod forum and a poster there described a great product that sounded perfect and the best part is that I could get it locally for very little out of pocket. What is this great stuff? It is called Thermwell 12 In. x 15 Ft. x 1/8 In. Self-adhesive Foil/foam Duct Insulation and you can get it at your local Home Depot for under $20 a roll. I purchased a roll so I could see if this really is the product for me.
Check it out here: Thermwell


What is so good about this you say? Well it won't absorb water, it won't grow mold, it is foil backed (the thickest foil I found on any of these products), it keeps the hot and cold out, it kills sound, it is easy to work with, and most of all, it is CHEAP! It also has an adhesive backing so it sticks and stays in place pretty well. Now that I had decided that this would suit my needs I picked up two rolls, some aluminum tape, got out some old scissors, and went to work.


I slowly started cutting pieces about 1' long and started putting them in place. I did have my heater out at the time so I was able to do a pretty good job at covering the fire wall. I went as high as I could and to be sure it would stay I used a little 3M sticky spray.






Once I had to the fire wall done I moved on to the passenger side and worked towards the back of the car. I would cut a piece and put it into place, then move on to the next piece. Each time I added a piece I would use the aluminum tape and use it to cover all the seams.


So after a couple of hours on a cool evening I was done. This is one of those projects that you want to take your time with and not get in a big hurry. I ended up using two rolls plus a little material off a third roll but I had some mistakes so maybe you can get it all done with two rolls. I have lots of tape left and only used the 3M spray on the fire wall.


The results are great. I started the car and can already hear a big difference in the sound. With this being a product used for home a/c & heating ducts I have no doubts that it will do a good job of keeping the elements at bay. Best part is that I did this entire project for under $50 because I already had the 3M in the garage. Now on to the carpet!
 

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Very nice write up indeed. I'm looking for something just like this for my insulation project.
Did you notice any differencies between the foam duct insulation and Dynamat e.g.? In one of your pics I see Dynamat on half of the area. Is this something extra you added?
MrBear
 

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Discussion Starter #5
the dynamat is the sound deadner only. It cuts down on the vibrations in the car. There are some heat/cold insulation properties with the product but it is mainly for sound. They also sell a insulation for hot/cold but it was beyond my budget.

What I did is install the dynamat to to sheet metal (body/floor) for the vibrations/solid sound and then put the insulation on next with total coverage. Then cover with a nice carpet. You can of course just use this with out the dynamat.

I have a write up on the dynamat that I got here:Dynamat - Budget Restomod Mustang

Hope that helps.
 

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Just purchased some of the foam insulation. Looking forward to get started. At the moment the 65 LTD only have a carpet and no insulation and Flowmaster 40's... I hope it will take some noise and vibration along with the heat/cold insulation.
 

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Is it good for how many months? I am planning to put insulators inside my vintage car. Though I love the summer heat here in our place, I need an insulator to protect my grandparents of heatstroke. By the way, I heard that GM, along with most many businesses, does engage in a bit of charity work and recently was discovered to be doing quite the novel thing with remaining car parts. Excess car insulation from older vehicles was put to use as a liner material for jackets that are being distributed to the homeless. I need to buy a car that works well for me soon.
 

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Or just buying it with the huge bailout they got , another way to stir things up, just mention gm on a ford forums.

This is a really good idea my firewall cooks me when I drive , anyone know how to completely stop the air coming through the blower when it is off? If so I'm set with this
 

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Most open cell foams like that absorb water, when you drip water on it, what happens?
 

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How much does it weigh, compared to other products. More or less?
I want to put some insulation, sound barrier in the car, but also want to shave lbs wherever I can.
 

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How much does it weigh, compared to other products. More or less?
I want to put some insulation, sound barrier in the car, but also want to shave lbs wherever I can.
My son and I have used various products for sound control and for thermal rejection. It depends on what you need out of it as to what products to use.

For example, I have a radiant barrier film to block heat that is a super light tough scrim like Tyvek but metalized, and can glue directly to the flooring and skins with spray adhesive. The stuff I have is made by Reflectix. Lowe's has it for a good price. Other stores have a similar product. That takes the edge off of thermal, and can be doubled by also going over carpet backing or sound deadener for more insulation if you have really hot pipes.

For sound, we've tried a bunch of stuff, but found two that really do well depending on purpose - roofing felt and pegboard. Pegboard was used by Ford way back to stop resonating large panels like doors and q-panels. Gluing a 1' square piece securely to the inside center of your door skin will make it sound like a luxury car when you shut it. Tends to help with resonant thrumming during cruise as well. Roofing felt is a cheap general sound deadener, and can be spray-glued everywhere you want to tame general noise or make your stereo sound twice as rich. Just spray and lay, slicing wrinkles so they overlap for a pretty smooth finish. Some like to paint adhesive on, but that may be heavier for you.

Notice a combo of radiant barrier film and roofing felt makes... Dynomat. OK, so not exactly, but darned close and you can vary the process and materials to make light or heavy versions of it. I have not tried it, but some have used radiant barrier and spray undercoating or roll-on bedliner for sound deadening and thermal rejection. Lots of options.

David
 

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My son and I have used various products for sound control and for thermal rejection. It depends on what you need out of it as to what products to use.

For example, I have a radiant barrier film to block heat that is a super light tough scrim like Tyvek but metalized, and can glue directly to the flooring and skins with spray adhesive. The stuff I have is made by Reflectix. Lowe's has it for a good price. Other stores have a similar product. That takes the edge off of thermal, and can be doubled by also going over carpet backing or sound deadener for more insulation if you have really hot pipes.

For sound, we've tried a bunch of stuff, but found two that really do well depending on purpose - roofing felt and pegboard. Pegboard was used by Ford way back to stop resonating large panels like doors and q-panels. Gluing a 1' square piece securely to the inside center of your door skin will make it sound like a luxury car when you shut it. Tends to help with resonant thrumming during cruise as well. Roofing felt is a cheap general sound deadener, and can be spray-glued everywhere you want to tame general noise or make your stereo sound twice as rich. Just spray and lay, slicing wrinkles so they overlap for a pretty smooth finish. Some like to paint adhesive on, but that may be heavier for you.

Notice a combo of radiant barrier film and roofing felt makes... Dynomat. OK, so not exactly, but darned close and you can vary the process and materials to make light or heavy versions of it. I have not tried it, but some have used radiant barrier and spray undercoating or roll-on bedliner for sound deadening and thermal rejection. Lots of options.

David
Do you mean roofing felt as in the black, asphalt rolls that go on beneath shingles on a roof? If so, does it reek of tar or petroleum product inside the car? Curious. Thanks for your short article.

David O.
 

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Do you mean roofing felt as in the black, asphalt rolls that go on beneath shingles on a roof? If so, does it reek of tar or petroleum product inside the car? Curious. Thanks for your short article.

David O.
Yes, #30 asphalted roofing felt. I have noticed zero aroma whatsoever, including in summer heat. However, that may depend on the brand and type/weight used (and there is a difference in "tar paper" and "roofing felt"), so sniff your roll. If you find any aroma, I would try another supply. I have not checked our local supply for aromatic rolls, and have not had any issue. So, It's either not a general problem, or I have good luck. ;)

David
 

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I used car insulation in my car a year ago and it felt like I was driving a different car afterwards lol. It cost me about $100 shipped for 100sqft but I do not know what it is now. I noticed it was quieter inside and a lot cooler in the summer that's for sure, I barely use my A/C at all in the summer now. I would think it would stay warmer in the winter but I do not drive my car when it is cold out...too much salt on the roads! It can be found here: Car Insulation
 
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