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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm losing my mind.

I am aware of the problems that can result due to incorrectly installing the torque converter on the shafts and then cranking up the engine to the trans when installing....

My questions is...as a result of the engine now not turning over by hand with the trans bolted up....

....how can you tell if in fact you HAVE damaged the transmission pump or torque converter as a result of a possible incorrect alignment of the TC/Splines/Engine?

I have not turned the engine over or forced anything....the trans and engine bolted together easily and tightly without problem. But, I cannot turn the crank by hand as I could before...it's rock hard. All 4 TC studs are ready to be nutted to the flexplate (but obviously I haven't done that since I am still in failure mode)

Could it be that I possibly have the trans in some gear and I'm trying to turn the crank by hand and essentially trying to roll the car forward by doing so? Is it an alignment problem with the TC? If so, how do I tell if I did damage anything?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Update. So I dropped the trans out of the car to inspect and yes, I caused damage.
It appears the problem was in the 'last' of the 3 spots that need to be aligned. I've dented the outer machined part of the torque converter by forcing it in to the pump area.
I know that is the problem because the 2 dents are corresponding to the 2 factory flat spots on the TC that go in to the pump, but 90 degrees off from where they should have been!
Luckily I did a search on our local on-line classifieds and found a guy with a basement full of C4 parts. He has a pump and will install it for me this weekend if I bring it to his house - and he's a certified transmission mechanic! He is also going to teach me a 'trick' to installing so this won't happen again. When he does, I will share it here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Stupid thing is, I was aware of this problem happening even before I started, not sure how I got to this point.

We pulled the fluid pump out today, cracked it open to check for damage and yes, I cracked both of the oil ring gears inside the pump. We were able to rebuild it with parts off another pump. Slathered the thing in petroleum jelly and reattached it to the transmission. I have photos and will post them of the damage in the next day or so.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Clutch part Gear Clutch Auto part Rotor


Auto part


This is what happens to the oil pump gears when you don't align the TC properly. The two flat spots on the TC should slide in to the spaces on the inner ring gear. When they don't and you try to 'pull' the bellhousing on to the engine with the mounting bolts, you're forcing the TC on to the ring gear and eventually crack it. You'll also notice dimples on the TC shaft end that were made as a result of the incorrect alignment.

I was lucky enough to have access to a spare pump and had the gears swapped out without too much trouble or cost. The burrs on the TC were sanded smooth and were not affecting the bearing/seal surface.

Live and learn.
 
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