Ford Muscle Cars Tech Forum banner

21 - 34 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
858 Posts
All very good info.. I will add if you were to use that Sonnax R servo , every one I have ever used has been too tight in the case and requires machining of the larger ring groove
I about to build a coupe C6 and going to try the Superior servo

For a cruiser a D servo is a good choice
Interesting about the Sonnax R servo, I have not had that problem,
but have had the teflon seal and O-ring on the servo stem be too tight in the bore and cause it to bind.
The problem is usually the O-ring.
I think Sonnax corrected that and now puts a slightly smaller O-ring in the kit.

The Superior servo is a good one too.

Superior K016 | Superior Transmission Parts - The problem solvers of the transmission industry

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,386 Posts
It has been a little while since I used a Sonnax . The Superior looks good that's the way I'm going this time to give it a try .
 

·
Registered
1969 Galaxie XL - 390 FE
Joined
·
69 Posts
Discussion Starter #24
Just dropped off the original trans to be rebuilt by the shop that did my trans on my last build. Turned out to be cheaper as well. $900 without the torque converter, which I have a new Hughes 2500.

Thanks for all the feedback.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
858 Posts
Just for fun... and apologies to the OP for the slight thread hi-jack...

Here are some pics of a C6 I worked on this last week... see if you can guess the application, IOW what vehicle does this trans fit?

Here is the linkage... notice anything unusual about it?
Hint; there is a clue as to what vehicle this trans is for, in the background of the first 2 pics... ;)

166890


166891


166892
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
858 Posts
Here's the servo case bore.
This is a D7 case with a casting date of 1986,
so the servo bore is fully machined and able to accept the R servo if you wanted to use it.
Compare this servo bore with the pic of the one posted (post #17) earlier in this thread.
Notice this bore is machined all the way to the bottom.

166895


166900


This is a stock rebuild so the original servo goes back in.
It's a common N code.

166898


This unit has a J code servo lever. Huh! I've never seen that before...
This is another clue to what application this trans is for....

166899


;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
858 Posts
It's a small block C6, that in itself is a bit less common than the FE or 385 series C6.

166901


This one (as all C6's that I build) will get the Sonnax one piece case bushing.
The bushing is marked with "grooves to front".
Here it is next to the old case bushings.


166902


Line up the lube hole! Very important!

166903


166904
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
858 Posts
It also gets a TransGo SK-6 shift kit and a new Sonnax boost valve and sleeve.
The valve in the pic is the old one, it's worn.
I should say, the aluminum sleeve is worn... this causes oil pressure to bypass the valve and causes pressure and shifting problems.

166905


166906
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
858 Posts
So this unit has what appears to be a 4X4 short cast iron extension housing...
See the transfer case shifter stud on the passenger side.
...but then it has that goofy looking extension part... what is that?
BTW I had to make that gasket. The overhaul kit does not come with it.

166909
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
858 Posts
Here's the C6 all assembled.... annnnd the big reveal. ;) :rolleyes:

This is an industrial C6 and this particular unit is in an airport "Mule", the kind that hauls around baggage carts and sometimes big airplanes.
The customer for this unit is Purolator, so likely a baggage cart hauler.
Those mule vehicles have something like a 25:1 final drive ratio!!! crazy!

Go back to the first picture in this series and look at the linkage.
The weird thing about it is... it's not drilled for a kickdown lever.... cuz why would you need a kickdown function on a vehicle like that?
So they just eliminated the KD linkage all together.
Another clue to the application of this unit is found in the casting number, also in an earlier picture..

The # D7JP is the giveaway.
First digit is the decade D = 1970's
2nd digit the year so D7 = 1977
3rd digit = vehicle model, in this case J = Industrial/Marine
4th digit = Design engineering office, in this case P = automatic transmission

And here it is..

166910


The back end is setup for a driveshaft E-Brake and a bolt-on yoke and brake drum.
I think they use the 4X4 shifter stud to mount the E-brake handle.
Very likely the shifter in this vehicle does NOT have a "Park" position.
They use the E-brake for that function, even tho this trans has the park pawl and function on the internal linkage.

In very heavy vehicles (think 3-5 ton trucks and Semi's) with automatics, they don't have or use a Park position.
The Allison 1000-2000-2400 series of transmissions have the capability to have a Park, but it is not used in the heavy applications
The Allison 1000 is in GM trucks up to the 3500 1 Ton series.They have Park.
But the essentially same trans 2000-2400 used in a school bus for example, do not have Park.
In those units the park pawl in not even installed, tho it "could be" cuz the case is machined for it.

166911


166912


Oh yeah, the clue I alluded to in the first post is the steel speedo gear, which is only used on truck bolt-on yoke extension housings, and this one of course.
The passenger car speedo gear teeth are rolled onto/part of, the output shaft, not a separate gear like this one.
The speedo cable hole (not shown) is blocked off on this one with a threaded plug. The gear is still needed as a spacer for the yoke.
No need for a speedo in a vehicle the has a top speed of a walking pace.

Cheers!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,055 Posts
That shift arm looks like late seventies that had floor shift and needed extra rod to get steering column to lock. Think my 78 Fairmont had one. Those tugger drivers going to have fun with a shift kit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
858 Posts
That shift arm looks like late seventies that had floor shift and needed extra rod to get steering column to lock. Think my 78 Fairmont had one. Those tugger drivers going to have fun with a shift kit.
Ya, that is a "backdrive" linkage for the column ignition lock.
Ford probably just took an existing linkage and didn't bother drilling it for the kickdown setup.
It does have an unusual part number tho....

That shift kit does not make aggressive shifts.
It's more of a "shift correction" setup, not a racing type kit.
It does bump the pressure up a tiny bit tho.

I didn't post any pics of the torque converter, but I will when we get it assembled.
We do in house converters, and this one needed some parts we had to order.
It's a Trans Specialties 10" high stall that I thought was weird to have in a vehicle like this,
but that's what it came with, so it goes back the same.
The trans has been worked on previously by an unknown shop.
I doubt they put the high stall in, it probably came with it originally.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,386 Posts
That's fantastic information. Just stuff likely never see otherwise .

Got the Superior servo kit today , very nice kit . Comes with a nice stiff spring more like the factory type but a tad shorter . I'll put it in the spring tester tomorrow see what it's at .
The Sonnax springs are very light. In the Transbrake setups I always used the factory springs as advised by Frank to suit his valvebody.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,386 Posts
I tested the superior spring today , it actually seems heavier than it is . It only came up 25LB @ 1.84" . I need to verify the installed height is same as other servo's .

As a comparison the factory springs vary between 40 + 60 LB depending on the wire size .

The Sonnax springs are 20 LB for the lighter and 30 for the heavier .
 
21 - 34 of 34 Posts
Top