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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hey guys, I have a paint question for you.
I'm considering painting the new fiberglass hood myself. I can borrow a gun and have a compressor. The car is baby blue but has been repainted and I think it's a bit different than the factory version of the color but who knows. What's the smartest way of getting it at least close to matching with a home paint job. Do I buy the factory color and add white/blue pigment to lighten/darken? or would my best bet be to have a pro look at the car and mix up a matching color for me?
The old paint has a clearcoat and it's still shiny, can I expect a single stage painted hood to ever match (and I really only want it close, it's a daily driver) or will I need to clearcoat that too?
thanks,
Matt Williams

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: sleeper67 on 5/2/02 5:21am ]</font>

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: sleeper67 on 5/2/02 5:28am ]</font>
 

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If you're fairly competent in laying down paint (and most importantly prepping the surface prior to the paint), I would suggest bringing your car to a professional to match the paint for you, then spray it yourself like you plan to. But in my (painful) experience, it really takes an experienced eye to know how the mixed color will look dry. Hey, how about blacking out the hood? That looks cool and racey too!
 

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I agree with HankyJ... I'd take a piece off the car (gas lid, cowl, etc.) and leave it at your local paint store to match. They usually charge a little more, but it's your best chance of getting it right on. Is there any reason you don't want to use a basecoat/clearcoat system? It has a lot of advantages, just costs a little more.

If you really want it to match you can blend it into your fenders... but that requires you to use the basecoat/clearcoat setup to do it right.

Or you can paint it black
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I was thinking a one stage would be easier and probably cheaper, but my experience with paint stops at aerosol cans. Is a 2 stage much harder/pricier to shoot?
The hood came black, and I've had it that way since last year... although a glossy painted black would be much nicer hmm.
but don't you think it's a little weird to have a blacked out hood on a baby blue notchback with a white vinyl top? maybe it's just me..

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: sleeper67 on 5/2/02 1:58pm ]</font>
 

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When I needed a paint patch a while back ... They made the paint in a 2 stage ... Said a much better paint match was possible that way (mixing in 2 stage).

2 stage is "priceyer and more spraying" just more stuff going on so to speak.

I didn't get a lot of detail on why they figured that way, but ...

My Two Cents

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Larry Madsen
Las Vegas Nevada



<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: MonsterMach on 5/2/02 10:27pm ]</font>
 

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The two stage is good for blending because you can feather and transition the new paint into your fenders till its just the existing paint and then clear everything.

The base paint drys very fast so it's difficult to run or catch dust and bugs in. When you clear the whole fender after blending the paint will look seamless and even if the color is a little different you won't be able to tell. The clear takes a litte getting used too, but even if you run it you can wetsand and buff it out later.

Stop by your local paint store (when it's not too busy) they can help you with the best route to take.

Good luck!
 

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Sleeper66,

The PPG paint store near where I live has a
electronic scanner that can look at a paint
sample (like your gas cap cover) and match
the color up spot on. If you buy the paint from them they don't charge you for the service, but charge 25 bucks if you just get
the paint number without buying the paint.

Base coat / clear coat is very easy to do and
very forgiving. The only problem I've run into in 10 or 12 jobs is clear coat sags and they were caused by following a friends advice to turn up the air presure. An amature can do expert looking base coat/ clear coat jobs. Its much easier to get good
results then with enamels and laquers. I would say that if you get the paint matched with a scanner you won't have to feather it into the front fenders to hide the blend line, it will be right on.

Bruce
 
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