Ford Muscle Cars Tech Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,216 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I got one and it came with staples. There are no staple marks on my core support. How do I put this on? Does anybody have photos? Car is my 65 fastback.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
I don't see why you couldn't go ahead & use if you allready have it. Seems to me it would aid in helping to make sure the air goes thru the radiator instead of around it, so that's a good thing, right?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,312 Posts
So, I take it you cheaped-out and didn't get the $3000 Ford hydraulic gun to install the staples with? ;) How I've done it is to lay it out on the support where it goes and tape it. Then take your staples and lay them out evenly spaced. You may want to space them closer where it it drops concave, but don't get too anal as the factory was quite sloppy about it. Anyway, I then put the staple where I want it and mark the leg spacing to drill with an .040/1mm bit (IIRC, maybe it was a tad larger to make it easier), through both the strip and the support.

Push the staple through and pinch the legs together partially with pliers to hold. Finish with the pliers on each leg to flush on the bottom. I found upside-down channel-locks to be good for the final pinch. Most I've seen are flat and flush legs. Some have been 'rounded' like a paper or box staple. If you want that style, I would try pinching the legs over a 3/32" bit or awl tip to get that shape. I haven't tried that style myself though.

While the factory didn't, I use a light smear of trim adhesive or RTV to stick it on well. Let it cure fully before closing the hood so it doesn't try to squirm out-of-place between staples. The originals usually failed because they would give between staples, tear, and then folks just ripped the rest off. BTW - I have seen them on mostly I6 cars, but also Ram Air/HiPo cars, and strangely enough most Mercury cars like my '69 351W Cougar. HTH

David
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,216 Posts
Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Ok, well, so I have this piece of rubberized thing with a flat part and then a round hollow tube part on one edge. On one side the flat part is smooth and on the other side it has ribs made into it. Does the tube go to the front or the back? Ribs on the top or the bottom. I've never seen one of these things on a car so I have no clue how it is supposed to go. It isn't really intuitive to me how it should be and I couldn't find any photo's on the net of one installed. It also didn't come with any instructions of course.

Found a diagram.


I have read that the 6 cyl cars had these because they did not install a fan shroud so they were hoping they would help air flow into the radiator. I'm looking for some of that. Doesn't matter that they were not originally on the v8 cars. Also hoping it will prevent some air from whistling over the carb until I can get my new hood and seal up a fresh air pan to the carb. Also hoping this will prevent some water from getting on the engine in the event i get caught out in the rain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,312 Posts
There are different schemes for various years and models, but the flat strip type (yours) has the ribs down, and the thin front lip hanging out forward of the support. The concept is that air is rammed through the grille and wants go around the radiator, so it goes up but hits the seal, pushing the seal up against the hood. HTH

David
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,312 Posts
No real rhyme or reason for staple locations:
That's the way I've seen most often, with the staples anchoring the bottom of the loop and covered by the flap. In this pic, he apparently used screws instead of staples, and you can see the heads bumping-up.

David
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,017 Posts
Here on the east coast I normally see the staples like this:








The above Sprint was an original paint rust bucket car that I rescued. The new rubber was put back the same way that I found the original.

My 2 cents: It kind of makes sense to do it this way as the staples are supporting 2 layers of rubber PLUS it would be the easiest way for the assembler to do it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,312 Posts
My 2 cents: It kind of makes sense to do it this way as the staples are supporting 2 layers of rubber PLUS it would be the easiest way for the assembler to do it.
Left in the unknown, I may have done it your way for the same reasons you said. And, from a functional standpoint, the flap is angled higher to seal better from the get-go. I'm wondering if there was even a standardized method from Ford at all...

David
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top