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Discussion Starter #1
I found a shop out of state that has a 69 Galaxie with disc brakes, and they want $300 plus shipping for the spindles/calipers/pads/rotors/etc. A customer drove it onto the lot so the pads and rotors are *probably* ok. Good deal or no?
 

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I paid $250 for mine out of a '68, but the calipers I used as cores, and I had a clean-up turn done on the rotors for $8 each. I also replaced the hoses which I think I would do either way.

Paul

1969 R-Code, 4-Speed, Drag-Pack Cobra Fastback Project
1967 Mercury Commuter Wagon w/mild 429

My Car Restoration Projects
 

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Personal opinions:

1) I'd try to get a '70-72 setup if I could in order to get the bigger stub-axle.

2) The whole setup would be around $150 + fees out of the local pick-n-pull, half that if you can find one on a half-price day, but then you've got to factor in the time, etc. involved.

3) The upside of the pick-n-pull approach is that you get to evaluate the parts' condition before you pull them; when it comes to rotors of that vintage you might end up with something good, or you might end up with worn or mismatched garbage.

4) You can't assume the calipers will be usable, either trade them for rebuilts or get some seal kits and rebuild them yourself (the latter case being a crapshoot if the piston bores are corroded...)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The problem is yards in the area just don't have cars this old. I've been doing some more searching and found spindles on ebay; if i had to piece-meal it, new rotors are $100+ each so I'd end up in the $250-300 range there. I also found a '70 wagon in Ohio an emailed about that.
 

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The problem is yards in the area just don't have cars this old. I've been doing some more searching and found spindles on ebay; if i had to piece-meal it, new rotors are $100+ each so I'd end up in the $250-300 range there. I also found a '70 wagon in Ohio an emailed about that.
Try car-part.com.

Cars of that age are not common in yards, self-serve or otherwise, around here either.

I've been buying up '70-72 drum-brake spindles lately (for the brake conversion I'm working on the drum spindles have more meat in the area where the bracket needs to mount) and I got a set from a yard in - Grand Island, Nebraska? - that if I read the tag correctly had been sitting on their shelf since 1979.

Bought a couple drums to pull the hubs out, but decided to use hubs cut down from disc rotors instead. Not that it matters for your purposes, but buying drums used seems to be a fool's errand - they're always out-of-round, worn out, or otherwise pretty much useless.

Core charge on the '70-72 calipers at Rockauto's only $10 (total $28/side w/o pads, $41/side with) - which is probably less than it'd cost you to ship them the cores - but the rebuilts do NOT include the piece that attaches the caliper body to the spindle, that the caliper body slides in, so you'd need this piece, or a set of junkyard calipers that include it.

Amazon's got the Raybestos 6014R rotors new for $56 each right now, says only two remaining. It's for stuff like this (and Tremec transmissions...) that the Amazon Prime 'free' shipping comes in handy.
 

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I would source the spindle assemblies without calipers or rotors. Rotors are under $60 with free shipping
here. Calipers are local for '68-72 Ford/Lincoln/Mercury for $30-35 each including core charge. That would give you a fresh setup for less than a pile of unknown parts shipped-in.
:tup:
David
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Hey I just found a set of '71 Tbird calipers, rotors and spindles for $175 through that car-part.com site. I guess since that's about the same price as piecing it out even with replacing the calipers, it really depends on the shape of the rotors.
 

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Hey I just found a set of '71 Tbird calipers, rotors and spindles for $175 through that car-part.com site. I guess since that's about the same price as piecing it out even with replacing the calipers, it really depends on the shape of the rotors.
Pay attention to the shipping cost, too, all this stuff isn't light.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I got a reply saying there's no pads or brake hoses, an it's missing one caliper bolt. Shipping estimated at $30-50; probably the latter.

Also got a reply from a guy in OH with a '70 wagon that he'd ship a whole setup for $225, though he wants to pull it's motor an trans first.
 

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I wouldn't waste my time with used rotors when new ones can be had so cheap. it can be difficult to find places that will turn rotors these days (at least in my area) and the old ones may not have enough meat left for turning. You will need to have them turned for new pads and any stuff this age would be highly suspect, so when it comes to brakes it doesn't make sense to mess round with questionable parts. It is not only your life that on the line.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The guy with the wagon is going to check on it's rotors tonight. I've got a brake lathe, so if they just need turned that'll be ok. Otherwise I'll try an make a deal on the rest of the parts, an order new rotors. I plan on using the calipers as cores for new ones too.
 

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I wouldn't waste my time with used rotors when new ones can be had so cheap. it can be difficult to find places that will turn rotors these days (at least in my area) and the old ones may not have enough meat left for turning. You will need to have them turned for new pads and any stuff this age would be highly suspect, so when it comes to brakes it doesn't make sense to mess round with questionable parts. It is not only your life that on the line.
I hate to toss good parts, especially if they are original. If they can be confirmed good, turned and still be in spec, what is wrong with that? I stripped everything out of mine, cleaned them, blasted them, painted them, and had them turned for $8 a piece. It was a lot more work, but I didn't buy my car with the understanding that it would be a maintenance-free purchase either. After I added new bearings, races, and seals, they are just as good as new (better since they are painted), and I get to keep another original part.

Don't get me wrong, if safety is a concern, no issues replacing the parts. The tie rods were good, but definitely on the used side of good. Rather than put something back on with a very questionable life expectancy, I replaced them all.

There's nothing wrong with cleaning up old parts to use, so-long-as they are still good.

Paul

1969 R-Code, 4-Speed, Drag-Pack Cobra Fastback Project
1967 Mercury Commuter Wagon w/mild 429

My Car Restoration Projects
 
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