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Hi again!

I just took my engine out of my 1962 Falcon and guess what, I have found a crack from the bolt holes for the upper control arm. The crack is approximately 1" in length.

I was thinking of this repair procedure and I would like some opinions on this matter.

1.Grind crack at least 1/2" either way from orginal crack

2. Preheat 200F

3. Weld with E-70S-6

4. Controlled cooling to ambient temp.

Does this make sense?


Thanks

Terry
 

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Same thing happened to my stang when my 14 year old brother took it out for a spin and slid it into a curb. I yanked the engine and took it to a body shop where they ground it down a little and put a plate on the inside and welded it down. Maybe you could lower your upper control arms like you do to mustangs. They are the same right? Why not improve your ride while you are going through all the trouble?
 

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I am not a fabricator, but I can say I have seen articles in Mustang mags on this type of repair, some vendors sell a strengthening kit for this problem ( precut pieces of metal welded in key locations ) if that is not what you want to do maybe you can check with local shops that work on classics and get their opinion.
 

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Check to make sure the spot welds in your shock tower plating haven't started to separate also. Theres the shock tower, a strap or middle plate and then the vertical rib part that ties into the frame rail. If you see round indentions where the spot welds are along the vertical rib it means the metal is trying to separate.

As important as fixing the crack is making sure the problem doesn't continue.
 

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1. Grind the crack out so you have about a 60 deg included angle, try and leave some face on the backside.
2. Make sure you get all of the crack.
3. Use ER70S-6 Mig wire and weld it up.
4. Make sure you have it clean
5. No need to heat mild steel. Usually alum and cast-iron are preheated.
6. Weld it up and make sure to get the bead above or even with surface level. Then grind flush, and make sure you don't have ANY undercutting.
7. Just let it air cool and DO NOT PUT water on it.
If you feel you are a good mig welder you will want to weld uphill (if possible) to achieve the greatest penetration.
 

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Before you start grinding and welding, drill say a 1/4" hole at each end of the crack. This will stop the crack from spreading during the welding process.
 

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I agree with drilling a small hole at each end of the crack to keep it from expanding, just like the pros do when welding up cracked heads and blocks. Also adding some reinforcement to the area couldn't hurt, if it cracks out once, it can do it again.

My 2 cents, good luck Roadwarrior.
 

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actually reinforcement could hurt, it will be putting more heat into the metal, and will be making one area stronger then another, which would be creating a point for a crack or bending to happen.
 
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