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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Disc brake install on a Fairlane - also aplies to Mustang and Falcons

I had a dual master cylinder with fresh drum brakes on my 1964 Fairlane. Driving around town it stopped fine. When stopping from higher speed I could feel them fade and the pedal effort went up. I only planned on more go power so I felt I needed more stop power. I looked around at kits and wanted to stay away from the Granada swap. I decided to buy brackets that used stock components and the stock spindles. The advantage to this is off the shelf parts and a brand new system for around $400.

The disadvantage is you need to be able to make some of your own brackets and lines so it will also take longer. Your set up may be a little different but I hope to show some ideas so you can decide if this or a full blown kit is the right choice for you. First we start by removing the drum set up.


That is a stock spindle. Fairlanes used the same spindle on V8 and I6 cars. Others may need V8 spindles. No need to remove any other parts here.


This is the bracket I bought and I am test fitting it. These brackets sell for around $100 and are listed to fit Falcons and Mustangs too. I purchased mine from an online auction from a person in Wisconsin with 428 in the name. It came with a complete parts list with numbers on the items needed. These could be used as is but I wanted to see if I could get a dust shield to fit. I used heavy paper to make templates to see what would fit.


This is what I ended up with.


I tacked them and test fit with rotors in place. Rotors are 11" Granada and since my wheel bearings were almost new I reused them.


Covers fairly well.


Everything cleared.


Attached, painted, and mounted on the spindle.
Some new brake lines will need to be made in most cases and I am not going to cover that. I may have been able to use the stock front hose location but I relocated mine for better fit. Here are a couple examples of some simple brackets to make things work. The hose brackets are just drilled, cut, and bent angle iron. The valve bracket is modified from some thing I had around.


Here is the drivers side bracket in place.


Here is the passengers side bracket in place. Hoses are 80's Camaro.


Time to put on the calipers. They happen to be GM metric calipers and pads. These pictures are after thousands of miles and so far the Fairlane has not rejected them.




Well I guess some thing needs to apply pressure so I used a Granada non power disc master. I already had a 60's Falcon dual master on it and both worked with my pedal and the rods that came with them.


I used a SSB spring loaded check to the front calipers and a Ford Racing adjustable proportioning valve to the rears. I am 100% satisfied with the performance of these brakes and would recommend putting discs on any of these old cars. The pedal effort is less and the stopping power is better. There are other similar kits like this out there. I am glad I did this but will admit about half way through I wondered if I should have bought a complete kit.

If you don't mind some fabricating this will save you some money. If you want to bolt on and go then buy a kit. I usually use at least 15" wheels but tried my forged 14" Enki's this summer for a different look. One caliper just touched where there was some flashing on the casting. Took a file to it and can say 14" wheels can fit with 11" rotors. A cast wheel would be too thick. Hope this helps if you do it yourself.

06-27-10 An update. Wilwood now makes a caliper for this application that is still reasonable in price and looks great. This same basic type bracket also fits Mustangs and Falcons so it is not Fairlane specific. I upgraded to rear disc brakes and used a 93 Mustang Cobra master. It has the smaller 1" bore and the pedal pressure and feel are very good. The new price was OK. It has metric fittings so I just bought metric to SAE adapters. The fittings are on the engine side but no problem with a small block. I used the
Granada push rod and it works well. An adjustable rear proportional valve was left in place.
 

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I bought it new for a 1978 Granada with a V8. I did not measure it. I have seen some listed at 15/16"
Nice little swap, i started out with almost the same swap, except 2nd yr in i switched to a set of braided brake lines,
The difference in pedal feel was quite amazing
 

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Nice little swap, i started out with almost the same swap, except 2nd yr in i switched to a set of braided brake lines,
The difference in pedal feel was quite amazing
Really? How so? I've seen the ads for these for quite a while and always wondered about them.
 

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Really? How so? I've seen the ads for these for quite a while and always wondered about them.
I used rubber hose and stopping at 100 MPH was not a problem and the pedal was firm so I wonder about this also. I would like to remind people that the Metric calipers come in sizes from about 2 3/8 to 2 3/4 and willwood also makes a caliper. The larger caliper is at least 20% more pressure than stock.
I did not list some part numbers in this post because I bought a kit with part numbers listed and I will not list them since I do not feel it is right for me to sell out some one that did the work. Pay $100 and get the parts list, bracket, and still be money ahead.
 

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I want to take a minute to say what an excellent job you have done in the presentation of your article. I have seen at least a dozen of these and it seems that the writers either hold back on what parts were used, (what specific part was used in the install) the sourcing of these parts, or the "need to know" info which would allow a decent mechanic to do this drastically needed upgrade. The Ford speciallity magizines seem as though there is some mystical knowledge that the one needs to be gifted with. Or if they were to divulge to much info to the reader, then the the reader would stop paying $1200.00 for a $400.00 retrofit. The publisher of the FORD dedicated periodicals tend to be writing some type of "info-mercial" for their largest brake supply house advertiser. I find this insulting and just plain frustrating. When a person like yourself cares enough about the hobby to make a conscious effort to give the reader the "whole story" then I think it is my obligation to let you as well the other readers of Ford Muscle know. But more importantly is letting the publishers of the "HOW TO" monthly's see what they should be providing as the standard of a good retrofit article. You should be proud of yourself for doing such a great job in your communication. Lastly, I want to tell you that out of the 4 years I have subscribed to several of these Ford dedicated publications that your article is the only one I have read that gives me enough info to actually do a change out of the front brakes. I hope others like myself will write to these publishers and let them know about how a "HOW TO" article should be written. That is what the subscriber is paying for. Credit should also be given to FordMuscle for allowing this open forum. The paper monthly's should be humiliated to put these adertisments masquerading as "We show you how to" articles in writting as thier front cover headliner. Allot of credit should be given for your hard work and care you have shared with all of us FORD folks. I can't say thanks enough. Thanks a ton, Sincerly, PW in Portland Ore.
 
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