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Due to some complications, I need to dolly-tow my Falcon.

I know on some manual transmissions, you're supposed to pull the driveshaft if you tow b/c the tailshaft doesn't get properly oiled if just the driveshaft's spinning.

Anyone know for sure?

Thanks
 

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I thought that was only for automatics, not manual transmissions? Sorry, I can't answer the question.
 

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I've towed my toploader equipped car for thousands of miles... and have never pulled the driveshaft. I've run 90+mph, and driven from where I life in central West Virginia to Columbus, OH... Norwalk, OH... Beech Bend Raceway on the far west side of KY. These trips range from 2.5hrs to 7 hrs each way. We're talking MULTIPLE trips to each destination. Never had a problem.

Good Luck!
 

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Due to some complications, I need to dolly-tow my Falcon.

I know on some manual transmissions, you're supposed to pull the driveshaft if you tow b/c the tailshaft doesn't get properly oiled if just the driveshaft's spinning.

Anyone know for sure?

Thanks
Either pull the driveshaft or just disconnect from the pinion flange.
The oil is only circulated when the input shaft turnsover the countershaft.
You can get away with short tows. After 5 miles start the engine & trans lube will be splashed onto the gears & syncros on the mainshaft. Bill
 

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I've towed my toploader equipped car for thousands of miles... and have never pulled the driveshaft. I've run 90+mph, and driven from where I life in central West Virginia to Columbus, OH... Norwalk, OH... Beech Bend Raceway on the far west side of KY. These trips range from 2.5hrs to 7 hrs each way. We're talking MULTIPLE trips to each destination. Never had a problem.

Good Luck!
I'll quote myself...

It will NOT hurt a toploader to tow with the driveshaft. I've done it for NUMEROUS extended trips at fast highway speeds. I can't see a T10 being any different.

Been there, done that.

And yes. This was with a dolly. I've worn worn out two sets of tires on the dolly pulling the mustang. No Problem.

Good Luck!
 

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Its your transmission do as you want.
I'll guarantee you that if i towed a vehicle more than 5 miles the driveshaft would be disconnected from the differential yoke.
I worked at a dealership & i would always have them refer to the owners manual or call customer service.
You may not realize it but what you say or recommend will hold up in court if a failure occurs.
Do not advise if you do not have sufficient documentation to back up your response.
Ignorance is no excuse. Bill
 

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it doen't matter , the rental place requires the OP to disconnect D/shaft. All other , your car & money , me safe is a lot better that sorry.
 

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Back in the day (mid 60's) we towed my 63 Sprint t-10, room mates 57 Vett all over the place, no issues. I also towed my 54 Ford sedan delivery with t-85 from Upland Ca. to Abilene KS no problems. All with the drive shaft in place. We towed my son's 97 Ranger from Indy to Sierra Vista AZ a couple of years ago drive shaft in place, no problem.
 

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Either pull the driveshaft or just disconnect from the pinion flange.
The oil is only circulated when the input shaft turnsover the countershaft.
You can get away with short tows. After 5 miles start the engine & trans lube will be splashed onto the gears & syncros on the mainshaft. Bill
The correct answer and explanation...
 

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There are two reasons to remove the shaft - if you have an automatic there is no lubrication to the transmission when the engine is off.
If you have a manual and it should slip into gear it can destroy your engine. Imagine pulling a car down the freeway at 70 mph for 264 miles with the towed cars transmission in first gear. Yep, there was a hole in the block and no oil in the engine - the car towed great!

Oh, as far as lube goes with manual transmissions, the output shaft turns and the friction on the gears will turn the counter gear enough to lubricate the transmission.
However - you can never be too safe and removing the back of the driveline and hanging it off to the side will never hurt anything.
 

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Some would rather repeat 'old wives tales' instead of listen to those who have actual experience.

It can't hurt to pull the driveshaft, but a bunch of oil will pour out the end, and you'll get all dirty for nothing.

If you insist on pulling the driveshaft, I'd look for another slipyoke to safetywire in place to keep you from losing all your gear oil.

Then again, you don't need to pull it at all.

Good Luck!
 

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if the towed cars transmission slipped into first gear, wouldn't you stop to see what was making the car pull so hard?
My brother-in-law said he never noticed that anything was wrong...
I guess it depends on what you pull it with and how heavy the towed car is.
If I noticed it suddenly got harder to pull I would have stopped - but would I have noticed? I don't know.
 
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