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Mobil 1, 10W-30 in a 428 with 250+ passes on current bearings and I know they will be in like new condotion when I look at them with 300+ runs on.
.003-.004 bearing clearances with a hi vol oil pump.
20 PSI hot after a run, 80 PSI thru the traps, anywhere on the track actually.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sorry for this stupid question, but do you get very much blue smoke from the exhaust ? My hard ran car with 70 thousand miles is starting to show some blue smoke at hammer time. I can not see this from my mirror, but I have been told so.

I have ran 10-30 Mobil 1 oil for years in it, was thinking of going old school with 10-40 Pennzoil.
 

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No no blue smoke, drag only but my new Ebok heads have fairly tight guides and seals on the intakes.
Engine gets rerung every 300 passes or so (400 miles
)
 

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Valvoline 20/50 racing oil. I change it and filter (7 qt system), after every weekend/racing event.
Non synthetic. Bearings (hell, everything inside), looks like new (except for that ONE burnt piston).............don't think the OIL had anything to do with that tho........................:&gt
 

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This is a speed secret. Most cars that are running anything heavier that 10-30, can gain one tenth of a second buy just changing to 10-30 or 5-30 if you have high oil pressure with your old oil.I like to see 55 to 60 psi max in a drag car. JOE SHERMAN RACING
 

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Just wondering. A lot of you guys in the U.S tend to go with the thinner oils. Just curious why.. Here the thin oils like 10/30 and down are only used in late model cars.
Reason i ask is here it is not uncommon for lot of people use straight 50 weight oil in race engines.
I use a 15/40 or 20/50 in my engines..
 

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I guess I run pretty much what my engine builder/machinist tells me to run.
I personally would be a bit paranoid running something that thin (like 5-20). (a personal thing)..............

Used to be I hated running those split ones . (i.e. 10/40, etc, etc.)
 

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I currently have 115K miles on my 2004 Marauder with a 9.5 PSI ProCharger (30K on the blower) and use Mobil I 5W30 with no consumption between 5K mile oil changes!!


I am MARRIED to this car since they only made 11,000 of them and no plans for any more!! I will keep it and rebuild anything that breaks!!


Mobil I ROCKS!!!


Cobrajack
 

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Heres an idea. For the short time that a dedicated race car is actually running, what exactly is the object of using multi-viscosity oils?

OK, if you have a street/strip car I can see and appreciate running multi-viscosity oil. If you drive the car 3-4 times a week, for something better than 10 - 20 miles, long enough to get the engine warm and the oil to do what its supposed to do. I can even get behind Mobil one or some other synthetic, since you know you are going to beat on it.

As far as a race car, I would think you are going to change the oil pretty regular, maybe after a weekend of racing - since you already stressed it pretty good, also - its a good way to see if there are any bearing issues creeping up on you as well as getting rid of gasoline and acid build up from high rpm running.

With a 10-40w oil, unless you get the engine hot, most of the time I'm thinking your effective oil is closer to 10 than to 40 weight. Might it not be worth running the correct single viscosity oil in the first place?

Not arguing with anything anyone has posted, matter of fact I run synthetic oil in all my street vehicles, including the Bronco, but these vehicles get beat on and get caught in the commute more often than not. The main reason for bringing up the subject is; these are just questions, topics to expand the discussion a little further than repeating what we read on the back of the oil can (plastic bottle) or in the car magazines.

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Beoweolf on 9/23/06 3:48am ]</font>
 

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whatever oil you choose you should look into adding a 1/2 quart of that lucas oil stablizer stuff. That stuff is sticky and works.
 

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I normally run 5-20 synthetic in the summer, and in the fall/spring I will run 0-20 synthetic. I normally put 50-60 passes on it before changing the oil. My bearings looked like new when I checked them this past winter.
 

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The best reason to run a thin oil in a drag car is so you can run the engine at a much cooler temp, which lets you make more HP. Contrary to popular befief, an engine will make more power when the water temp is COLD. The trick is to get the oil to flow smoothly when it is still cool--hense, the need for thin ( or synthetic ) oils. I have seen 20 more HP on the dyno with COLD water and warm oil. JOE SHERMAN RACING
 

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And most all out drag motors dont run long enough to get thick oil heated up enough to thin it down.
 

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...With a 10-40w oil, unless you get the engine hot, most of the time I'm thinking your effective oil is closer to 10 than to 40 weight. Might it not be worth running the correct single viscosity oil in the first place? ...
So, you both agree - that for a dedicated race car, there might not be a practical reason to run multi-viscosity oil.

Reasoning this thru...if the engine is a sustained rpm engine, as in road race, rally, etc...you have time to warm up the engine before putting it to stress?

Or if it is a drag race engine, you are going to run it hard then shut it down, so you don't "need" to have the added protection of a High viscosity oil or are willing to trade for the extra 10 - 20 hp freed up from reduced friction, since the engine isn't going to get that hot for any length of time?

In both cases, you know and respect the optimum engine temp and expected duration of the stress.

Might have something to do with the infamous, "Burn-down" contests of the 80's and '90's when funny car drivers would play with staging, hoping the other guy didn't have the reserves to keep from over heating.

But that still doesn't take into account (for the average "Joe Racer"
how crowded the tracks are today. At the popular tracks, on weekends and special occasions there is a lot of "hurry up and wait" in the lanes. Between starting, stopping and waiting, it might be hard to depend on 10w oil to be there when you finally get staged?

I guess you could push your car until you are ready to go?

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Beoweolf on 9/23/06 12:44pm ]</font>
 

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I never push my car in the staging lanes. Idling in the staging lanes isnt going to put much heat in the oil. I start my car, pull it forward, and shut it off. Plus, if the guy next to me in elims is pushing and doing all that stuff, I'm going to "drag my feet" about getting to the tree and staging once we pull on to the track (do my burnout last, take my time pulling to the tree, wait for him to go in first and take my time before going in, etc.) If he's that overly concerned about heat, I'm going to use it to my advantage.

I helped on a dirt track car for several years. There the oil got hot. After 15 laps in the summer, it was not uncommon for the oil temp to be 250-275*. That was why we ran heavy oil. It saw a lot of heat for an extended period of time. I would be very surprised if the oil in my racecar ever got over 200*, even hot lapping it in the later rounds. And if it did, it's not for extended time, so it doesn't concern me.

For most street/strip cars, I wouldn't run oil as light as I do in my racecar. My gf's car, which is a street/strip car that see's 95% strip time right now, I still run 10-30 synthetic in it. I wouldn't run anything lighter in it. Actually I need to change it. I put 10-40 in it for the summer.

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: kid vishus on 9/23/06 6:48pm ]</font>
 

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On 2006-09-22 12:42, Beoweolf wrote:
Heres an idea. For the short time that a dedicated race car is actually running, what exactly is the object of using multi-viscosity oils?


<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Beoweolf on 9/23/06 3:48am ]</font>
If I could get 15 weight straight Mobil 1 I would use it or even 10 weight.
Royal Purple does have those weights but it is expensive and hard to find for me.
10W-30 MObil 1 is (relatively) cheap and I can get at Canadian Tire (our local chain)
 
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