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Discussion Starter #1
new starter solenoid, plugs, and ignition coil. Turn the key nothing happens... zero... not a click just turn nothing. I can make the engine turn over at the starter solenoid by basically doing a hot wire which I should not be able to do while the key is in the off position right? . Though I pull a spark plug and have no spark. Could anyone narrow down why I may not be getting a spark?
 

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Welcome to the Forums. :tup: What year and engine Falcon? Does your car have a factory tachometer?

If the starter relay (fender solenoid) works by jumping power to the "S" terminal to engage the starter motor, the relay should be good. This indicates the starter relay is not getting a start signal from the key switch to the "S" terminal.

I would use a volt meter or test light to test for power to the key switch (YEL wire at key switch "B" terminal). If the switch does NOT have power, test the BLK/YEL wire from the starter solenoid battery stud to the ignition switch. The BLK/YEL wire will splice to the YEL key switch wire under the dash.

If the key switch has power, turn the key to START and test for power at the key switch "S" terminal (RED/BLU wire). If you have power there, test for power at the other end of the wire, at the starter relay "S" terminal. If the testing fails (voltage lost) at any point, the failure is likely the component, wire or connector before the failure.

The starting (cranking) circuit must be repaired first, as the ignition circuit is tied to the ignition. You should get ignition coil power during cranking directly from the starter relay's "I" terminal to the ignition coil - and you may not be. First things first, and some quick 'n simple testing will tell you what's really bad, so you're not wasting time and money replacing stuff that may not be the issue.

David
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Welcome to the Forums. :tup: What year and engine Falcon? Does your car have a factory tachometer?

If the starter relay (fender solenoid) works by jumping power to the "S" terminal to engage the starter motor, the relay should be good. This indicates the starter relay is not getting a start signal from the key switch to the "S" terminal.

I would use a volt meter or test light to test for power to the key switch (YEL wire at key switch "B" terminal). If the switch does NOT have power, test the BLK/YEL wire from the starter solenoid battery stud to the ignition switch. The BLK/YEL wire will splice to the YEL key switch wire under the dash.

If the key switch has power, turn the key to START and test for power at the key switch "S" terminal (RED/BLU wire). If you have power there, test for power at the other end of the wire, at the starter relay "S" terminal. If the testing fails (voltage lost) at any point, the failure is likely the component, wire or connector before the failure.

The starting (cranking) circuit must be repaired first, as the ignition circuit is tied to the ignition. You should get ignition coil power during cranking directly from the starter relay's "I" terminal to the ignition coil - and you may not be. First things first, and some quick 'n simple testing will tell you what's really bad, so you're not wasting time and money replacing stuff that may not be the issue.

David

David, thank you so much for responding so quickly with this issue. I have a 1968 falcon with the 4.7 289. Original tranny and engine. No factory tach.

So, as far as my testing goes black and yellow have power at the relay. Yellow has power at the key switch. Red and blue at the relay has zero.

Does the terminal that holds the starter wire require a jump wire to the S terminal?

Also, while I was tooling around. I grabbed the back of the ignition cylinder where it connects to the wiring harness and my alternator light had turned on. Which it previously did not do. I turned the key to the on position. The red and blue wire still had no voltage to it at the starter relay.

Please feel free to email me directly.

[email protected]

Thank You!

Matt
 

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Does the terminal that holds the starter wire require a jump wire to the S terminal?
Matt, if I understand your question correctly - no, there is no jumper from the starter relay starter cable stud to anything. Only the starter cable to the starter.
... I turned the key to the on position. The red and blue wire still had no voltage to it at the starter relay.
You should do the RED/BLU wire test with the key in the START position - not just ON. The RED/BLU wire goes hot to trigger cranking only. It should be dead at any other time.
... If the key switch has power, turn the key to START and test for power at the key switch "S" terminal (RED/BLU wire). If you have power there, test for power at the other end of the wire, at the starter relay "S" terminal. ...
David

This is a generic diagram of most classic Ford systems. To crank the engine, the key switch must be in the START position. The starter cranking signal should then be present on the RED/BLU wire at the key switch, and pass through the NSS to the start relay "S" terminal:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
David,

Ok so I have a functioning ignition switch. Power all the way to the points in the distributor. Still Unable to get spark at the plugs. ground wire in distributor? plug wires? distributor condensor?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Well David,

Thank You for all of the information. She is now roaring like a lion. I got everything functioning. I changed out the distributor point after getting spark from one point to the other by bridging the point with a screwdriver. Then realizing that there was a point missing on the set. One more question if you do not mind. I have installed 3in headers on this 289. Headers decrease compression ratio correct?
 

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Headers do not affect compression ratio, but can slightly affect dynamic compression (running cylinder pressure). Generally, only by very small amounts in less than racing engines, and generally not a substantial factor or concern in street engines. Your camshaft timing makes a much greater dynamic compression difference than the headers, though they are often used in combination to increase power in specific rpm ranges.

David
 
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